U.S. Rail Service Improves

By Mary Kennedy
DTN Cash Grains Analyst

Omaha (DTN) – Milder weather and lower freight volumes have helped improve railroad service across the country, according to a recent BNSF report.
In its weekly service update, BNSF said that operations remained fluid over the past week with strong gains in on-time performance across all business groups. “With Thanksgiving behind us and freight volumes returning to their traditional levels, locomotives are becoming more available and favorable conditions exist for improved velocity and network performance as we approach the New Year. We also expect milder, above-average temperatures throughout much of the network, particularly in the North Region, during the upcoming week.”
One snag in service was a der-ailment on Dec. 1. near Wadena, Minn., which closed both tracks. Service was restored by Dec. 4, and traffic is once again moving at a normal pace.
The ongoing labor dispute in the Pacific Northwest is still an issue for all railroads in that corridor. BNSF said it is continuing to manage service inconsistencies at the ports and in some cases have place restrictions on some export/import traffic at several of its hubs. BNSF said, however, some of those restrictions were “subsequently withdrawn based on a daily evaluation of conditions. With port operators and dockworkers resuming contract negotiations, we continue to hope for a resolution in the near future.”
According to its weekly update to the Surface Transportation Board (STB), BNSF cars due in North Dakota rose to 3,783 versus 3,145 the prior week. Montana’s total was lower at 1,361 versus 1,381 the prior week, and Minnesota’s total was also lower at 617 versus 891 cars the prior week. Shuttle turns per month to the PNW was steady at 2.4 TPM versus the desired turns of 2.5 per month.
To see all of the Class 1 railroad service updates to the STB on Dec. 3, go to: http://goo.gl/IbOHHL
CANADA EXTENDS MINIMUM MANDATE BUT LOWERS TARGETS FOR RAILROADS
This past August, the Canadian government raised the minimum weekly volume for shipments of grain that Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) and Canadian National Railway (CN) have to move in order to alleviate the rail backlog in Canada that was costing farmers and grain handlers lost revenue. The original mandate of 500,000 metric tons of grain was set in March, and in August, the mandate was raised to 536,260 metric tons with an expiration date of November. If the railroads did not meet those mandates, there were monetary penalties to be paid.
On Saturday, Nov. 29, the Canadian government extended a mandate for the movement of grain by rail through the end of March 2015. The new weekly minimum will require the CN and CP to ship 200,000-465,000 metric tons and can fluctuate in that range through March 2015. Dow Jones reported the following targets for Nov. 30, 2014, through March 2015:
Time period - Metric tons per, week: Nov. 30, 2014 to Dec. 20, 2014 - 345,000; Dec. 21, 2014 to Jan. 3, 2015 - 200,000; Jan. 4, 2015 to Feb. 21, 2015 - 325,000; Feb. 22, 2015 to March 21, 2015 - 345,000; March 22, 2015 to March 28, 2015 - 465,000
The mandate is designed to ensure Canada’s grain crop is moved in a timely fashion in the hopes of preventing the backlog that left nearly 30 million metric tons of grain waiting to be moved through the first half of 2014.
According to an article published by Argus Media, the government also ordered carriers to provide data on railcar order fulfillment by corridor, including the placement of cars at producer loading sites and along short-line railways to help promote transparency, at similar request made in the U.S. by the Surface Transportation Board. The difference is that the Canadian order includes a penalty of up to C$100,000 per violation if a carrier misses its quota, while there is no monetary penalty in the U.S.
Small single-car grain shippers on short lines in Western Canada felt the original mandate only helped the large-unit shippers and left them short of cars most of the year with no recourse to the railroads. One of those shippers told DTN in an email that “It’s nice to see the government appear to hold the railways to account, but it isn’t clear that these orders do much to affect their performance ... except to give the railways another excuse to not service small shippers.”
He went on to say that shippers continue to receive roughly “half of their weekly wants. With the new process of canceling unplanned orders at the end of each week, CN shows no backlog of orders. Since this implementation, we have had over 300 orders cancelled.”
He said that shippers have seen some cars most weeks, which is a huge improvement from last winter. “Service hasn’t deteriorated ... yet.” Many shippers wonder what will happen if the winter turns ugly and if railroad performance will suffer even with the mandates in place. Both railroads were also required to submit winter contingency plans to the government to include service strategies for “producer car loaders and short-line railways” through July 2015.
Both the CP and CN have publicly stated that they will continue to meet the grain mandates even though they don’t agree with Bill C-30. In April, prior to the mandate becoming law, the Calgary Herald reported that the CEOs of both rail companies expressed their opposition to the House of Commons. The Herald reported that CN CEO Claude Mongeau called the introduction of the bill “a sad day for Canada,” while CP CEO Hunter Harrison called it “grossly unfair.”
The Herald also reported that Harrison told the government at the April meeting, “We are very concerned about the speed and lack of consultation by the government in making such significant changes to the rail transportation system that could result in unintended consequences for all stakeholders. We need to move away from reactionary legislative interventions that target unfairly one participant.”

DJ McDonald’s November Sales Decline Sharply In U.S.

By Julie Jargon And Chelsey Dulaney

McDonald’s Corp. posted its steepest monthly decline in U.S. same-store sales in more than 14 years, adding urgency to the burger giant’s efforts to rejuvenate its business in its most important market.
McDonald’s reported sharper-than-expected sales declines in all its divisions in November. The U.S. slide was the largest, with sales falling 4.6% from the same month a year ago, far more than the 1.9% drop analysts had projected and more than September’s 4.1% sales slide in what was then the company’s biggest monthly drop since early 2003.
McDonald’s blamed the decline on “strong competitive activity” and said it is “diligently working to enhance its marketing, simplify the menu, and implement a more locally driven organizational structure to increase relevance with consumers.”
The company has been losing customers to fast-casual chains and to such rivals as Five Guys Holdings LLC and Chick-fil-A Inc. that focus on just a few menu items. McDonald’s menu has become bloated in recent years as the chain has added everything from fruit smoothies to salads in a bid to appeal to broad range of customers. The result has been slower service, which has driven away many customers.
McDonald’s Chief Executive Don Thompson has vowed to fix the problems and the company said it would host all investor conference, presumably to update investors on its plans. McDonald’s also has shuffled its management ranks, naming a new U.S. president in August and, more recently, creating a new organizational structure in the U.S. with four geographic zones to better respond to local tastes. Under that system, for example, menu items that might appeal to customers in the South won’t necessarily be offered to those in the West.
“The reality is that our current U.S. structure is not optimized for the customer,” McDonald’s U.S.A. President Mike Andres said in an October email to U.S. franchisees and corporate staff, which was reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. “What has worked for McDonald’s U.S. for the past decade is not sufficient to propel the business forward in the future.”
McDonald’s shares, which were already down slightly for the year, fell 3.8% to $92.61 and was the worst performer in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The decline was the stock’s biggest one-day percentage drop in more than two years.
The company said global same-store sales fell 2.2% in November, while analysts had expected a 1.7% decline, according to Consensus Metrix. November’s drop-off followed a smaller-than-expected 0.5% slide in October.
In the company’s Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa region, sales at existing locations fell 4%, missing the 3.8% drop analysts were expecting. McDonald’s performance in the region appears to be improving somewhat after one of its meat suppliers was accused of intentionally selling expired meat to restaurants in July. The scandal shook consumer confidence and has driven down sales in recent months. McDonald’s said it expects the supplier issue and currency fluctuations to bring down its fourth-quarter results.
In Europe, broader economic softness has been compounded by political complications in Russia, where authorities have been inspecting and shutting McDonald’s restaurants-widely seen as retaliation for U.S. sanctions in response to Russia’s military incursion in Ukraine. McDonald’s sales fell 2% in its Europe division in November as “very weak results” in Russia offset strength in the U.K. Analysts had projected a 1.9% decline in the region.
McDonald’s projected the supplier issue in China would dent its fourth-quarter earnings by between seven and 10 cents a share, while the strengthening of the U.S. dollar against foreign currencies is expected to bring down results by between seven and nine cents a share.
Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters recently said they expected per-share earnings to fail 9% to $1.27 a share in the fourth quarter. Revenue is expected to fall 3% to $6.85 billion.

John Deere Equipment Sales Down 20% For The Year

(Dow Jones) – Deere & Co. projected a 20% decline in farm equipment sales for the recently started business year, warning again that lower commodity prices and falling farm incomes are putting pressure on demand for agricultural machinery.
The Moline, Ill., company, which also reported a 20% decline in earnings for its fourth quarter, posted lower equipment sales for the two previous quarters as well, as farmers, have been reluctant to buy new equipment.
However, comments appeared somewhat bleaker than those the company made three months ago when it called the agricultural economy relatively healthy.
“The slowdown has been most pronounced in the sale of large farm machinery, including many of our most profitable models,” Chief Executive Samuel R. Allen said in a news release.
In the year that ended Oct. 31, farm equipment sales dropped 13%.
Shares declined about 3% premarket.
Deere, the world’s largest manufacturer of farm equipment by sales, has been hurt by decreased demand due to unfavorable changes in the agriculture industry. When crop prices were high, farmers flush with cash frequently turned over their equipment, with many large operators buying new models every year or two.
But every new tractor sold generates one to three sales of used equipment, as farmers purchasing used late-model machines trade in their machines, which are eventually bought by other farmers, who unload even older equipment into the used market.
As a result, some analysts are warning the equipment market has become clogged with too much late model, used machinery that could hold down a recovery in new-equipment demand for years.
In the most recent quarter, equipment sales fell 6.7% from a year earlier to $8.04 billion, while operating profit dropped l4% to $1.17 billion.
Farm equipment sales fell 13% to $6.16 million due largely to lower shipment volumes and unfavorable effects of currency translation.
But in the construction and forestry segment, sales rose 23% to $1.88 billion while operating profit soared 93% to $228 million.
In the company’s financial-services business, earnings increased 9.6% to $172 million due to growth in the credit portfolio, though the company had a higher provision for credit losses.
In all, the company reported earnings of $649 million, or $1.83 a share, down from $807 million, or $2.11 a share, a year earlier. Sales fell 5.1% to $9 billion. Analysts had projected earnings of $1.57 a share on revenue of $7.75 billion.
Looking to the year ending in October, the company expects total equipment sales to drop 15%, with a 21% decline in the first quarter. Deere forecast earnings for the year of $1.9 billion, while analysts called for $2.2 billion.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 49,400

Texas 16,800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 26 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 720 lbs 241.00; 750-775 lbs 235.42; 800-825 lbs 850 lbs 226.50; Jan 700 lbs 235.30; 800 lbs 231.00; Feb 725 lbs 230.50; Apr 224.50; June 800 lbs 225.25; Del Current 760 lbs 234.75; 800-825 lbs 234.10; 850 lbs 230.00; Jan 775 lbs 229.50; 825 lbs 230.00; Feb 775 lbs 229.50; 800 lbs 227.00; Mar 775 lbs 229.50; Apr 775 lbs 230.50; May 775 lbs 230.50; June 775 lbs 230.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 660-665 lbs 246.45; 700-750 lbs 235.39; 750-790 lbs 230.26; 800-820 lbs 224.85; 950-955 lbs 209.10; Jan 800 lbs 227.60; Del Current 775 lbs 233.00; 800-835 lbs 231.76. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs 223.46; Jan 700-725 lbs 224.71; Feb 700-725 lbs 222.36; Mar 700 lbs 226.10; Apr 750 lbs 217.50; Del Current 700 lbs 230.30; Jan 725 lbs 222.50; Feb 725 lbs 222.37; Mar 725 lbs 222.50; Apr 725 lbs 223.00; May 725 lbs 223.00; June 725 lbs 223.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 655 lbs 228.85; 725 lbs 224.35; 750-775 lbs 217.39; Dec-Jan 725 lbs 218.10; Del Current 725 lbs 225.00; 775 lbs 227.00.

Oklahoma 5700. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 234.60; 800-825 lbs 233.23; 850 lbs 230.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB 775-795 lbs 228.82; 800-825 lbs 227.33; Feb 775 226.50; Mar 775 lbs 226.50; Apr 775 lbs 227.50; May 775 lbs 227.50; June 775 lbs 227.50. Medium and Large 2 FOB Current 690 lbs 243.33; Del Current 665 lbs 242.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700 lbs 227.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Jan 725 lbs 219.50; Feb 725 lbs 219.50; Mar 725 lbs 219.50; Apr 725 lbs 220.00; May 725 lbs 220.00; June 725 lbs 220.00; Del Current 775 lbs 223.00.

New Mexico 1800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 23 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 800 lbs 230.00; 825 lbs 229.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 800 lbs 232.06. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current 725 lbs 224.57; 775 lbs 226.60.

Kansas 4200. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 13 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 825 lbs 228.00; 850 lbs 231.00; Del Current 750-775 lbs 237.98. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 825 lbs 226.50; Del Current 660-685 lbs 250.14; 710-740 lbs 238.73; 760-800 lbs 233.32; 800-815 lbs 229.52; 950 lbs 211.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 222.03; Del Current 750 lbs 225.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — December 5
National feeder cattle receipts: 275,600

Feeder cattle and calf markets were active following the Thanksgiving holiday week with many markets selling two weeks’ worth of receipts. Price trends for calves were steady to $5 higher with many areas $10-15 higher. Yearling feeders traded unevenly steady with most advances early in the week before the Board retreated mid-week. Several major auctions held special value added sales this week as the OKC West-El Reno OK Livestock Auction sold over 8800 head of long timed weaned reputation calves for the Oklahoma Quality Beef Network and Integrity Beef Alliance on Wednesday. The El Reno market quoted most feeders $4 higher and all selling with good demand on many reputation long-time weaned calves. Each week a larger percentage of the feeder offering has now been weaned for at least 30 days and starting to reach the desired timeframe of 45 days away from their mothers. Very good demand was noted in the Northern Plains where on Wednesday at the Hub City Livestock Auction in Aberdeen, SD 7150 head sold on a very active market with 253 head of value added steers averaging 513 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $335.43. Then 679 head of their bigger brothers weighing between 600-650 lbs averaging 623 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $276.11. In Bassett, NE on Wednesday sold a number of reputation sandhill calves with 160 head of fancy steers averaging 665 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $285.58 and 321 head of steers averaging 718 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $271.74. On Thursday in Ogallala, NE sold 7100 head of feeders with several load lots of value added NHTC cattle selling on very good demand as 173 head of steers weighing 733 lbs dropped the gavel at $299.50 and a pot load of their bigger brothers weighing 796 lbs at $280.50. The feeder cattle market has had an astounding up movement this fall which has been stimulated by record fat cattle prices, low numbers and low corn prices. Many farmer feeders continue to attend and buy cattle after a record corn crop; leaving them to look for additional profit opportunities with lower corn prices. The feeder cattle market has had very few corrections and no one knows what the future holds but so far this feeder market has been pretty much bullet proof. It’s worth noting that corrections can happen and usually do happen to good markets. So far any corrections in the feeder cattle market have not induced any big moves lower and the downturns encountered so far have been pretty trivial. Negotiated cash fed cattle traded $5 lower in Kansas mid-day Friday at mostly $168, while dressed sales in Nebraska were mostly $3 lower at mostly $264 for the week. This week’s auction volume included 48 percent over 600 lbs and 37 percent heifers.

Texas 6500. 71 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (373) 356.02; 400-450 lbs (439) 318.74; 450-500 lbs (480) 305.69; 500-550 lbs (531) 278.56; 550-600 lbs (576) 277.08; 600-650 lbs (620) 249.78; 650-700 lbs (670) 249.95; 700-750 lbs (730) 243.24; 750-800 lbs (763) 237.84; 800-850 lbs (830) 231.86; load 1035 lbs 201.00. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (332) 313.52; 350-400 lbs (396) 307.13; 400-450 lbs (417) 303.04; 450-500 lbs (475) 287.99; 500-550 lbs (519) 278.61; 550-600 lbs (572) 251.40; 600-650 lbs (620) 241.72; 650-700 lbs (665) 250.00; 700-750 lbs (737) 217.94; 800-850 lbs (832) 218.02. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 319.84; 350-400 lbs (382) 313.18; 400-450 lbs (414) 296.21; 500-550 lbs (533) 245.47; 550-600 lbs (582) 236.71; 600-650 lbs (611) 241.49; 650-700 lbs (687) 231.79; 700-750 lbs (707) 231.57; half load 850 lbs 210.25. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (306) 290.92; 350-400 lbs (364) 297.63; 400-450 lbs (434) 272.04; 550-600 lbs (580) 231.35; 600-650 lbs (610) 225.24; 650-700 lbs (671) 222.16; 700-750 lbs (742) 220.64.

Oklahoma 12,900. 54 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 393.29; 350-400 lbs (378) 365.90; 400-450 lbs (423) 351.41; 450-500 lbs (477) 320.09; 500-550 lbs (524) 305.30; 550-600 lbs (575) 283.44; 600-650 lbs (617) 269.34; 650-700 lbs (676) 252.47; 700-750 lbs (718) 243.74; 750-800 lbs (772) 233.90; 800-850 lbs (812) 229.45; 850-900 lbs (870) 230.22; 900-950 lbs (928) 216.96; 950-1000 lbs (983) 214.68. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (315) 341.06; 350-400 lbs (360) 345.35; 400-450 lbs (429) 337.97; 450-500 lbs (480) 299.44; 500-550 lbs (525) 288.46; 550-600 lbs (570) 273.35; 600-650 lbs (622) 254.01; 650-700 lbs (673) 245.84; 700-750 lbs (731) 232.69; 800-850 lbs (827) 224.85; 850-900 lbs (864) 222.13. Holsteins: Large 3 part load 1075 lbs 157.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 336.11; 350-400 lbs (370) 325.19; 400-450 lbs (426) 306.24; 450-500 lbs (480) 289.74; 500-550 lbs (513) 270.12; 550-600 lbs (558) 262.62; 600-650 lbs (619) 243.60; 650-700 lbs (678) 231.74; 700-750 lbs (719) 226.49; 750-800 lbs (760) 223.99; 800-850 lbs (820) 213.48; pkg 885 lbs 206.50. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (330) 319.62; 350-400 lbs (383) 313.74; 400-450 lbs (424) 290.53; 450-500 lbs (479) 275.43; 500-550 lbs (527) 262.18; 550-600 lbs (573) 244.09; 600-650 lbs (617) 231.86; 650-700 lbs (683) 229.52; 750-800 lbs (776) 215.88; 850-900 lbs (870) 208.80.

New Mexico 4400. 37 pct over 600 lbs. 33 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (394) 354.69; 400-450 lbs (423) 331.69; 450-500 lbs (479) 298.38; 500-550 lbs (525) 277.98; 550-600 lbs (580) 259.37; 600-650 lbs (623) 243.90; 650-700 lbs (669) 237.24; 700-750 lbs (715) 224.05; few loads 795 lbs 230.00; 800-850 lbs (814) 203.89. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (416) 300.30; 450-500 lbs (473) 272.91; 500-550 lbs (524) 277.37; 550-600 lbs (574) 259.05; 600-650 lbs (616) 239.78; 750-800 lbs (771) 218.71. Holsteins: Large 3 pkg 280 lbs 257.00; pkg 395 lbs 228.00; half load 480 lbs 237.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (367) 317.45; 400-450 lbs (421) 289.48; 500-550 lbs (534) 258.59; 600-650 lbs (612) 231.23; 650-700 lbs (670) 220.29; half load 765 lbs 218.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (431) 274.68; 500-550 lbs (518) 243.64; 550-600 lbs (571) 233.46; 600-650 lbs (623) 221.36.

Kansas 15,600. 82 pct over 600 lbs. 34 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (374) 368.25; 400-450 lbs (431) 347.42; 450-500 lbs (479) 318.17; 500-550 lbs (519) 299.78; 550-600 lbs (571) 287.51; 600-650 lbs (622) 283.24; 650-700 lbs (684) 240.89; 700-750 lbs (725) 245.30; 750-800 lbs (784) 240.89; 800-850 lbs (839) 238.07; 850-900 lbs (867) 228.88; 900-950 lbs (925) 224.95; 950-1000 lbs (978) 211.65; 1050-1100 lbs (1078) 201.60. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (460) 302.09; 500-550 lbs (538) 286.25; 550-600 lbs (568) 277.65; 600-650 lbs (633) 260.44; 650-700 lbs (679) 251.00; 700-750 lbs (722) 243.14; 750-800 lbs (774) 239.11; 800-850 lbs (834) 229.91; 850-900 lbs (878) 224.15; 900-950 lbs (923) 216.93; few loads 1000 lbs 207.10. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (430) 299.94; 450-500 lbs (467) 291.43; 500-550 lbs (525) 270.97; 550-600 lbs (580) 256.09; 600-650 lbs (624) 246.57; 650-700 lbs (676) 241.75; 700-750 lbs (733) 232.73; 750-800 lbs (771) 224.00; 800-850 lbs (823) 218.91; 850-900 lbs (893) 210.10; 1000-1050 lbs (1033) 197.56. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (432) 284.86; 450-500 lbs (478) 275.88; 500-550 lbs (530) 262.04; 550-600 lbs (573) 252.93; 600-650 lbs (634) 242.89; 650-700 lbs (681) 230.95; 750-800 lbs (760) 220.63; 800-850 lbs (832) 206.96; 850-900 lbs (869) 206.93.

Missouri 47,400. 50 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 346.58; 350-400 lbs (373) 340.32; 400-450 lbs (424) 326.59; 450-500 lbs (472) 310.07; 500-550 lbs (529) 297.31; 550-600 lbs (574) 280.07; 600-650 lbs (624) 266.30; 650-700 lbs (670) 254.31; 700-750 lbs (730) 245.29; 750-800 lbs (766) 237.14; 800-850 lbs (822) 235.59; 850-900 lbs (879) 232.30; 900-950 lbs (920) 229.75. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (327) 317.69; 350-400 lbs (374) 310.19; 400-450 lbs (428) 297.77; 450-500 lbs (478) 284.81; 500-550 lbs (525) 275.10; 550-600 lbs (574) 262.11; 600-650 lbs (630) 256.50; 650-700 lbs (671) 240.64; 700-750 lbs (720) 234.44; 750-800 lbs (773) 227.02; 800-850 lbs (817) 224.56; 850-900 lbs (877) 218.69; 950-1000 lbs (980) 202.55. Holsteins: Large 3 850-900 lbs (870) 173.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (285) 306.10; 300-350 lbs (329) 313.30; 350-400 lbs (373) 297.11; 400-450 lbs (427) 287.49; 450-500 lbs (474) 272.04; 500-550 lbs (528) 256.58; 550-600 lbs (576) 246.16; 600-650 lbs (627) 239.48; 650-700 lbs (670) 238.33; 700-750 lbs (719) 225.49; 750-800 lbs (780) 219.02; 800-850 lbs (816) 206.98; 850-900 lbs (859) 214.56. Medium and Large 1-2 250-300 lbs (272) 321.55; 300-350 lbs (323) 274.04; 350-400 lbs (373) 275.12; 400-450 lbs (426) 266.60; 450-500 lbs (478) 251.81; 500-550 lbs (523) 241.18; 550-600 lbs (570) 234.63; 600-650 lbs (622) 227.12; 650-700 lbs (679) 226.03; 700-750 lbs (722) 219.56; 750-800 lbs (774) 212.53; 800-850 lbs (827) 218.83; 850-900 lbs (873) 216.41.

Arkansas 7600. 32 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 349.93; 350-400 lbs (373) 337.59; 400-450 lbs (424) 315.75; 450-500 lbs (472) 300.15; 500-550 lbs (522) 288.68; 550-600 lbs (569) 272.19; 600-650 lbs (620) 253.39; 650-700 lbs (668) 243.57. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 304.96; 350-400 lbs (374) 300.03; 400-450 lbs (423) 288.79; 450-500 lbs (477) 274.39; 500-550 lbs (527) 255.16; 550-600 lbs (571) 238.32; 600-650 lbs (623) 229.44; 650-700 lbs (667) 223.14.

 

 

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Friday, December 12, 2014 11:19 AM