Smithfield Plans To Cut Quarter Of Its Carbon Emissions

(Dow Jones) – Pork giant Smithfield Foods Inc. plans to cut a quarter of its carbon emissions over eight years, a voluntary move the company hopes will trim costs and burnish its brand.
Virginia-based Smithfield will scale back applications of fertilizer used to grow grain for pig feed and install systems to extract natural gas from manure, among other measures. The Environmental Defense Fund, which worked with Smithfield on the plan, said it is the most ambitious commitment yet by a U.S. meatpacker to curtail greenhouse-gas emissions.
Smithfield Chief Executive Ken Sullivan, a company veteran who took the helm last January, also sees a business case for emitting less. He expects more energy-efficient operations to save money and boost Smithfield’s standing in restaurants and grocery stores. Two-thirds of U.S. consumers will pay more for a product marketed as sustainable, says research firm Nielsen.
“Everyone is more sensitive to these issues these days, including our customers,” said Mr. Sullivan, who estimated Smithfield has already invested tens of millions of dollars in environmental efforts.
President-elect Donald Trump has pledged to roll back environmental regulations he says put U.S. businesses at a disadvantage. But Mr. Sullivan said Smithfield’s emissions plan is “apolitical” and not a response to any regulatory pressure, Rather, it is based on business and the belief it is the “right thing,” he said.
WH Group Ltd., the China-based pork supplier that acquired Smithfield in 2013 for $ 4.7 billion, supports the move. “If you’re going to be the world’s largest pork company, you ought to be a leader,” Mr. Sullivan said.
The $198 billion U.S. meatpacking industry over the years has been criticized for a range of practices, including its treatment of animals, the use of drugs such as antibiotics and for polluting water sources with waste. Environmental groups also have castigated the sector for its outsize contribution to climate change. The massive farms that each year supply 93 billion pounds of steak, ham and chicken to restaurants and retailers contribute the largest portion of the 36% of U.S. emissions that the White House says arise from agriculture.
Smithfield estimates it emits about 17 million metric tons of carbon dioxide annually, nearly as much as five coal-fired power plants. The company was long vilified as a top polluter. In 2001, former CEO and Chairman Joseph W. Luter III derided Smithfield’s critics as whiny.
But just a year later, Smithfield hired Dennis Treacy, a former director of Virginia’s Department of Environmental Quality, to help make the company more environmentally friendly. Mr. Treacy had sued Smithfield in the 1990s for wastewater violations. At the time, he said, “we didn’t think much of Smithfield.”
In 2010, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. set a goal to eliminate 20 million metric tons of greenhouse-gas emissions from its supply chain, and turned to suppliers such as Smithfield. Mr. Treacy and Kraig Westerbeek, head of Smithfield’s environment and support operations, in 2013 met with the Environmental Defense Fund to draft plans for farmers to reduce fertilizer runoff. Those talks led to more ambitious plans.
“We became more comfortable having uncomfortable conversations,” said Maggie Monast, manager of sustainable sourcing at the New York-based environmental group, who helped Smithfield shape the plan.
The company hired University of Minnesota researchers to quantify carbon emissions across Smithfield’s operations. Hog manure contributed the most, as much as 35% of the total. Grain production and processing contributed roughly another quarter, while cooking and refrigeration by customers represent up to another 25%. Transport, slaughtering and power for Smithfield’s plants and buildings make up the remainder.
To cut the total by one-fourth, Smithfield has hired agronomists and purchased sensors to help farmers monitor the content of their soil and avoid applying too much fertilizer, such as nitrogen, which emits nitrous oxide when spread onto cornfields. Some truck routes will be redrawn to reduce driving distances.
The feces-filled lagoons abutting hog farms will be a priority, said Stewart Leeth, who this year replaced Mr. Treacy as chief sustainability officer. Smithfield will cover pools and add systems called anaerobic digesters that convert methane into electricity or natural gas, which can be sold to local power companies. Covering the pools also reduces overflow risks from rainstorms.
Smithfield has invested in such projects since the 1990s, with mixed results. Officials hope heavier investment in the technology will improve its economics. Over the next five years, Smithfield aims to install conversion systems on at least 70 of its 250 company-owned hog farms, up from about 20 currently.
Climate-change critics such as the Environmental Defense Fund see efforts like Smithfield’s as among their best bets to reduce emissions should the Trump administration bring in a less-stringent regulatory regime.
“This shows that companies are looking to the consumer and beyond just election cycles,” said Ms. Monast. “People want to know what’s in their food and what the impacts were.”

Farm Income To Hit 7-Year Low

By Pam Smith
DTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology Editor and Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

(Dow Jones) – Income for U.S. farmers will fall 17.2% this year to a seven-year low, as falling livestock revenues add to pressure from lower grain prices across the Farm Belt.
The Agriculture Department said net farm income will drop to $66.9 billion, its lowest point since 2009 and the third consecutive decrease since farm profits hit record highs in 2013.
The forecast points to a continued decline in the U.S. agricultural economy, prompted by four straight years of bumper corn and soybean harvests as well as record global grain supplies.
The outlook is dimmer than the $71.5 billion in income forecast by the USDA in August. The lower projection reflects weak livestock prices, and the harvest of what was likely the largest corn crop on record this autumn.
Earlier this month, the USDA estimated domestic farmers would harvest the biggest corn and soybean crops in history: 15.226 billion bushels of corn and 4.361 billion bushels of soybeans. Huge supplies of meat this year also have sent prices plunging.
Livestock receipts are expected to fall 12.3% in 2016 thanks to declining revenues from milk, cattle, hogs, poultry and eggs. Profits are falling after farmers started raising more hogs and broiler chickens, the government said.
The USDA said annual crop receipts would remain steady this year from 2015 despite declines in prices for major U.S. crops like corn and wheat. While receipts for the two grains are expected to drop 4% and 10% respectively, soybeans receipts will increase 16% amid projected record production and higher prices for the oilseeds this year.
With the falling incomes, the USDA said, government payments to farmers would likely increase 19.1% this year to $12.9 billion, as insurance like programs kick in.

Looking At A New Safety Net

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Chicago (DTN) – A new farm bill creates the opportunity to deal with current struggles with different commodities as well as potentially reward rural America for its support of President-elect Donald Trump, a prospect for U.S. Agriculture secretary said at the DTN/The Progressive Farmer Ag Summit.
Chuck Conner, president and CEO of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, remains high on several speculative lists as a Trump nominee for Agriculture secretary. Conner was a deputy Agriculture secretary under President George W. Bush and served a five-month stint as acting secretary during that time.
Under the theme of “Farm Strong,” the l0th annual DTN/The Progressive Farmer Ag Summit kicked off Dec. 5 and continued through Dec. 7 in Chicago. Markets in China, tax issues and farm policy were among the major topics.
Conner did not talk about any potential job interviews, but he highlighted the prospects for a new farm bill under the next Congress that would help deal with some of the problems with the current farm safety net.
Conner, who began working on farm policy in the late 1970s, noted most farm bills are dictated by events in the ag economy over the prior year. “If you can tell me where prices are, and more importantly, where they are trending around the time Congress begins the farm bill debate, then I can usually give you some direction where they are going to go with the farm bill,” Conner said. “Short-term prices have a big impact on long-term farm policy.”
Given the overwhelming strength of the rural vote for Trump, Conner noted Trump owes his presidency to rural America. That should translate into an opportunity to write a “blockbuster” farm bill.
“There is no doubt this election showed rural America still has a tremendous amount of influence on national elections, and in this case on farm policy as well,” Conner said. “That represents an opportunity for us on a number of fronts, but particularly as we write a farm bill.”
The Senate Agriculture Committee is going to be busy early next year dealing with hearings and votes for Trump nominees at USDA, but Conner still believes the House and Senate Agriculture Committees will focus in 2017 on drafting new farm legislation.
Conner stressed the economic situation for farmers isn’t as bad as it was in the early 1980s leading up to the 1985 farm bill. Still, net farm income has dropped below the 10-year average, a key indicator that lawmakers watch.
“It is a trend line that is not good, but it also represents an opportunity for us in these times,” he said.
BIG TOPICS FOR FARM POLICY
The big topics for farm policy will be to revamp policies and programs for dairy and cotton producers, Conner said. Historically, USDA has had a stronger dairy program to help manage markets and supply. The new program in the 2014 farm bill saw an enrollment decline with dairy farmers seeing few benefits from an insurance program pegged to feed costs.
Cotton producers saw their commodity programs go away in the 2014 farm bill, but the insurance program created for cotton, known as STAX, also is not popular with producers and has limited enrollment. Cotton producers have aggressively pushed to get cottonseed designated as a separate commodity crop.
Further, Conner said he thinks Congress will address some inequities of the Agricultural Risk Coverage program that causes farmers in one county to get a large ARC payment while farmers in an adjacent county get none.
“This has played out a number of times in the past year – a real disparity there and frankly an unfairness that has to be corrected legislatively,” Conner said.
Those demands for changes to commodity programs will likely require Congress to look at cutting other parts of the farm bill to prop up the farmer safety net, Conner said. “Just to maintain the current safety net is going to require more resources,” Conner said. “If you fix dairy, if you fix cotton, if you fix some of these discrepancies in payments, it could require significantly more resources.”
And yet Trump’s tax proposals are projected to increase the budget deficit by an average of $600 billion a year over the next decade – $6 trillion over 10 years – if all of those tax cuts are implemented. That would leave Congress reluctant to prop up safety net programs.
“We’re not expecting to have enormous resources in the next farm bill,” Conner said.
Conner said it might be possible to take some funds from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which takes up the lion’s share of funding at USDA, to pay for farmer programs. Yet, Conner noted that would be a significant battle with urban members of Congress and budget hawks.
PUSH FROM CRITICS
While farmers would like to see the safety net strengthened, Conner also pointed out there will continue to be a push from critics to reduce payment limits in the commodity programs and cap payment indemnities on crop insurance. There will also continue to be a big drive to cut premium subsidies for crop insurance as well. Conner said such changes to crop insurance would likely lead the largest farmers to get out of the insurance program.
“You would be knocking out those people who are already the least likely to collect to the detriment of everybody else,” Conner said. “Insurance rates would have to skyrocket to cover only those higher-risk producers.”
Conner also warned against the idea of dividing nutrition and farm programs in a farm bill. He said there would never be another farm bill again if that were to happen.
Regulations were another key factor in Trump’s election. Conner said he expects Trump to take early action to get rid of some of the rules such as the waters of the U.S. regulation. “In effect, you guys voted for Trump in rural America mainly to say ‘We expect you to stop that.’”
Yet Conner also noted farm critics, such as staff at the Environmental Working Group, will push a tough agenda on issues such as water quality to target farmers and demand tougher restrictions on production. Strong conservation incentives in the farm bill can help offset some of these battles, Conner said.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 40,100

Texas 27,500. 99 pct over 600 lbs. 29 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs 129.52; 750-800 lbs 130.94; 800-825 lbs 131.89; Jan 750 lbs 126.80; 800 lbs 120.00; Feb 675 lbs 129.15; 750 lbs 123.04; Mar 675 lbs 124.43; 725 lbs 125.00; 750 lbs 122.00; 800 lbs 118.00; Apr 750 lbs 125.00; May 800 lbs 118.45; Del Current 640 lbs 140.00; 655-695 lbs 140.00; 700-715 lbs 135.44; 755-785 lbs 133.00; 800-825 lbs 132.30; 850-895 lbs 130.05; Jan 725 lbs 126.00; 750 lbs 129.75; 800 lbs 125.38; Feb 800 lbs 120.38; Mar 750-775 lbs 124.11; 800-825 lbs 119.73; Apr 750 lbs 126.00; May 775 lbs 123.14; 825 lbs 117.00; June 800 lbs 119.35; July 800 lbs 119.35. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 635 lbs 126.50; 650-700 lbs 126.85; 700-730 lbs 126.70; 750-800 lbs 122.80; 800-835 lbs 125.34; 850-855 lbs 123.99; Feb 700 lbs 122.90; Del Current 550 lbs 127.80 Mex; 675-695 lbs 136.32; 700-735 lbs 133.33; 750-780 lbs 132.14; 775 lbs 115.00 Mex; 800-835 lbs 129.24; 860 lbs 131.00; Jan 625 lbs 137.00; 725 lbs 130.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 600 lbs 128.00; 670-680 lbs 122.38; 750-785 lbs 119.78; Jan 700-725 lbs 120.67; Feb 675 lbs 119.85; Mar 675 lbs 120.15; 700-725 lbs 114.67; Apr 725 lbs 120.00; Del Current 640 lbs 123.50; 710-750 lbs 126.84; Jan 700-725 lbs 121.27; Feb 700 lbs 114.60; Mar 700725 lbs 117.03; Apr 725 lbs 118.00; May 650 lbs 121.00; 725 lbs 117.72. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 690 lbs 126.00; 725-730 lbs 124.80; 750-775 lbs 127.01.

Oklahoma 1600. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 53 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Jan 750 lbs 123.75; May 750 lbs 119.02. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Jan 750 lbs 117.25; Del Current 850 lbs 128.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 650 lbs 125.75; Mar 700 lbs 114.22.

New Mexico 3200. 94 pct over 600 lbs. 27 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 675 lbs 136.00; 775 lbs 130.00; 800 lbs 128.00; Jan 750 lbs 128.75; 800 lbs 122.75. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 550 lbs 131.00 Mex; 825 lbs 130.52. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 725 lbs 124.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 750-775 lbs 126.29.

Kansas 2500. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 26 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 790 lbs 129.50; Jan 800 lbs 124.35; Del Current 935 lbs 135.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 900 lbs 126.00; Del 675 lbs 135.25; 700 lbs 132.75; 790 lbs 134.00; 900 lbs 127.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 126.50; 770 lbs 127.00; Jan 725 lbs 117.22.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — December 2
National feeder cattle receipts: 275,900

Steers and heifers traded $2-6 higher with most steer calves under 600 lbs up to $10 higher. Several mid and late week auctions were called sharply higher and while they were in fact much higher, many were looking back two weeks due to last week’s Thanksgiving holiday. Those sale barns had some catching up to do with last week’s early auctions, many of which had held specials before the holiday break. Demand was very good for all classes of cattle this week, but still exceptionally good for light cattle suitable for wheat. Winter weather curtailed receipts in parts of the Dakotas but elsewhere across the country the supply was heavy. The volume that was lagging in the early fall is being caught up now. The cash feeder market has re-energized, with several weeks of steady gains being convincing enough for owners to finally bring their stock to town. In some parts of the country, the supply was so heavy that by mid-week competition for available trucks was just as intense as the rivalry ringside. Weaned calves continue to make up a larger percentage of the offering each week and in most places, the competition to own anything that could be placed in an extended winter grazing program is fierce. Buyers seem to have a renewed confidence in the market, evident by their willingness to chase some cattle to prices that haven’t been seen in months. Colder weather moved into the Midwest mid-week which will help harden and ‘green up’ fleshier cattle. Fed cattle traded as much as $3 higher Nov. 30, $114.00-115.50 live and northern dressed sales at $175. Futures prices are now lagging cash by quite a few dollars, as the market moves in a more fundamental direction with cash cattle leading the board and not the other way around. Cash trade has tacked on $10 in just three weeks and fats are as close to break evens as they’ve been in quite some time. Big kills over an extended period has cleaned up the front end, giving cattle feeders a little leverage they’d needed. It is rumored though that some pockets of heavy cattle are still standing around in parts of Nebraska and Iowa, areas where packer needs aren’t as urgent and show lists aren’t always cleaned up. Packers will push to keep kills large and are clearly willing to pay up a bit, giving up a bit of margin even, as they have fewer formula cattle available in the short term. Optimism is bountiful as the entire cattle complex has recovered remarkably from early November lows. Cattlemen are fully aware of the fickle nature of their market and while there’s no assurance this six week rally will hold it has brought a little relief to an industry that badly needed it.

Texas 7400. 50 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (432) 167.62; 450-500 lbs (480) 152.64; 500-550 lbs (512) 146.05; 550-600 lbs (578) 139.73; 600-650 lbs (617) 132.39; 650-700 lbs (673) 128.63; 700-750 lbs (729) 130.06; 750-800 lbs (771) 131.87; 800-850 lbs (840) 129.96; 850-900 lbs (863) 130.36; half load 930 lbs 127.50. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (431) 152.53; 450-500 lbs (482) 140.86; 500-550 lbs (536) 124.89; 550-600 lbs (582) 125.46; 650-700 lbs (689) 121.90; 750-800 lbs (764) 127.71; 850-900 lbs (858) 125.93. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (464) 138.98; 500-550 lbs (528) 127.65; 550-600 lbs (565) 120.95; 600-650 lbs (628) 124.66; 650-700 lbs (663) 125.45; 700-750 lbs (732) 124.10; pkg 955 lbs 101.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (434) 132.19; 450-500 lbs (479) 125.55; 500-550 lbs (522) 114.04; 550-600 lbs (576) 112.90; 600-650 lbs (616) 112.99; 700-750 lbs (703) 125.17; half load 770 lbs 117.20.

Oklahoma 38,300. 51 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (320) 189.55; 350-400 lbs (369) 190.71; 400-450 lbs (423) 177.07; 450-500 lbs (473) 166.98; 500-550 lbs (520) 157.37; 550-600 lbs (570) 145.88; 600-650 lbs (621) 136.82; 650-700 lbs (670) 133.26; 700-750 lbs (728) 134.42; 750-800 lbs (775) 133.79; 800-850 lbs (826) 133.81; 850-900 lbs (866) 133.29; 900-950 lbs (924) 129.16; load 970 lbs 127.00. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (370) 171.36; 400-450 lbs (423) 163.89; 450-500 lbs (475) 157.49; 500-550 lbs (518) 146.15; 550-600 lbs (582) 136.75; 600-650 lbs (630) 130.68; 650-700 lbs (665) 132.08; load 740 lbs 131.00; 750-800 lbs (784) 128.64; 800-850 lbs (835) 127.19; few loads 880 lbs 128.00; half load 930 lbs 126.50. Holsteins: Large 3 pkg 600 lbs 60.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (333) 159.46; 350-400 lbs (380) 154.54; 400-450 lbs (426) 144.79; 450-500 lbs (475) 139.41; 500-550 lbs (524) 134.27; 550-600 lbs (570) 129.85; 600-650 lbs (623) 130.68; 650-700 lbs (673) 129.23; 700-750 lbs (727) 127.01; 750-800 lbs (770) 126.41; 800-850 lbs (827) 120.73; 850-900 lbs (873) 123.50. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (330) 153.86; 350-400 lbs (381) 149.24; 400-450 lbs (423) 133.46; 450-500 lbs (476) 134.81; 500-550 lbs (523) 128.76; 550-600 lbs (575) 124.41; 600-650 lbs (632) 118.10; 650-700 lbs (678) 122.50; 700-750 lbs (717) 122.53; 750-800 lbs (785) 121.37; half load 860 lbs 122.50.

New Mexico 4500. 40 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (364) 184.62; 400-450 lbs (434) 172.70; 450-500 lbs (482) 160.27; 500-550 lbs (528) 148.51; 550-600 lbs (578) 141.10; 600-650 lbs (610) 137.98; 650-700 lbs (679) 129.10; 700-750 lbs (728) 123.55. Medium and Large 12 450-500 lbs (465) 158.98; 500-550 lbs (521) 144.51; 550-600 lbs (574) 138.93; 600-650 lbs (631) 132.03; 650-700 lbs (673) 122.03; 700-750 lbs (722) 125.47. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (440) 144.93; 450-500 lbs (475) 138.53; 500-550 lbs (516) 132.08; 550-600 lbs (571) 124.98; 600-650 lbs (624) 123.22; 650-700 lbs (667) 118.48. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (375) 154.14; 450-500 lbs (475) 132.97; 500-550 lbs (527) 124.95; 550-600 lbs (581) 119.17; 600-650 lbs (610) 117.82.

Kansas 11,400. 69 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (421) 177.22; 450-500 lbs (468) 163.82; 500-550 lbs (526) 149.33; 550-600 lbs (580) 141.93; 600-650 lbs (604) 140.77; 650-700 lbs (675) 136.24; 700-750 lbs (725) 134.48; 750-800 lbs (780) 133.58; 800-850 lbs (831) 134.85; 850-900 lbs (875) 133.65; 900-950 lbs (924) 132.63; 950-1000 lbs (982) 129.49; 1000-1050 lbs (1013) 126.86. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (425) 164.99; 450-500 lbs (484) 157.17; 550-600 lbs (578) 137.53; 600-650 lbs (632) 133.98; 650-700 lbs (669) 128.09; 700-750 lbs (723) 128.21; 750-800 lbs (767) 127.01; 800-850 lbs (827) 124.24; 850-900 lbs (873) 129.12. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (428) 146.67; 450-500 lbs (474) 140.63; 500-550 lbs (516) 141.43; 550-600 lbs (571) 129.38; 600-650 lbs (614) 128.37; 650-700 lbs (671) 131.84; 700-750 lbs (732) 126.39; 750-800 lbs (774) 129.43; 800-850 lbs (833) 129.13; 850-900 lbs (873) 129.28; 900-950 lbs (905) 120.85; 950-1000 lbs (977) 122.04; 1000-1050 lbs (1033) 118.99. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (434) 142.75; 450-500 lbs (481) 131.53; 500-550 lbs (518) 129.35; 550-600 lbs (578) 123.56; 600-650 lbs (621) 123.48; 650-700 lbs (678) 125.38; 700-750 lbs (717) 121.36; 750-800 lbs (777) 126.97; 850-900 lbs (887) 123.32.

Missouri 49,500. 69 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 161.23; 350-400 lbs (376) 163.00; 400-450 lbs (429) 159.58; 450-500 lbs (474) 156.23; 500-550 lbs (522) 147.39; 550-600 lbs (572) 138.48; 600-650 lbs (623) 137.18; 650-700 lbs (671) 131.28; 700-750 lbs (725) 131.65; 750-800 lbs (771) 132.55; 800-850 lbs (819) 130.31; 850-900 lbs (865) 131.14; 900-950 lbs (920) 132.95; 950-1000 lbs (963) 123.32. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (325) 148.34; 350-400 lbs (379) 159.37; 400-450 lbs (422) 146.15; 450-500 lbs (479) 142.44; 500-550 lbs (521) 138.83; 550-600 lbs (575) 131.85; 600-650 lbs (625) 128.60; 650-700 lbs (672) 125.21; 700-750 lbs (719) 127.54; 750-800 lbs (776) 120.46; 800-850 lbs (813) 123.54; 850-900 lbs (875) 119.94. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 142.98; 350-400 lbs (377) 137.62; 400-450 lbs (428) 135.44; 450-500 lbs (474) 131.62; 500-550 lbs (525) 125.93; 550-600 lbs (570) 123.16; 600-650 lbs (621) 122.21; 650-700 lbs (677) 122.42; 700-750 lbs (721) 124.21; 750-800 lbs (770) 121.11; 800-850 lbs (822) 114.73; 850-900 lbs (882) 121.54; 900-950 lbs (913) 107.48; 950-1000 lbs (978) 110.18. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (331) 132.61; 350-400 lbs (378) 131.44; 400-450 lbs (428) 126.10; 450-500 lbs (476) 122.27; 500-550 lbs (525) 119.61; 550-600 lbs (575) 115.13; 600-650 lbs (621) 118.26; 650-700 lbs (667) 115.45; 700-750 lbs (718) 116.09; 750-800 lbs (773) 114.67; 800-850 lbs (822) 116.41.

Arkansas 7400. 21 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 177.79; 350-400 lbs (373) 166.20; 400-450 lbs (421) 157.90; 450-500 lbs (477) 150.19; 500-550 lbs (521) 141.31; 550-600 lbs (571) 132.14; 600-650 lbs (620) 128.54; 650-700 lbs (671) 122.12. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 143.09; 350-400 lbs (376) 137.16; 400-450 lbs (425) 132.83; 450-500 lbs (475) 128.35; 500-550 lbs (525) 123.12; 550-600 lbs (571) 118.66; 600-650 lbs (620) 116.64; 650-700 lbs (672) 112.00.

 

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Thursday, December 8, 2016 10:47 AM