USGS Finds Expanding Presence Of Insecticide In Midwest Waters

By Todd Neeley
DTN Staff Reporter

Omaha (DTN) – Neonicotinoid insecticides associated with corn and soybean seed treatments are increasingly showing up in surface waters across the Midwest, a new U.S. Geological Survey study found.

The study, “Widespread occurrence of neonicotinoid insecticides in streams in a high corn and soybean producing region, USA,” found neonicotinoids more frequently and in higher concentrations than historically-used organophosphates and carbamates found in previous studies in similar regions.

Neonicotinoids are used in many standard seed treatments for corn and soybeans. USGS collected data from nine rivers and streams, including the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. The rivers studied drain most of Iowa, parts of Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The study said those states have the highest use of neonicotinoid insecticides.

“This study found that neonicotinoids are both mobile and persistent in the environment, with chemical use and precipitation being important driving factors for their off-field transport to streams,” the USGS said in the study published in Environmental Pollution.

Neonicotinoids have faced increased scrutiny as a possible cause for weakening bee colonies – some pointing to neonicotinoid seed treatments of corn and soybeans. Many of these crops, however, do not rely on bees for pollination. Initial complaints focused on contaminated planter talc settling on flowering trees and flowers visited by bees. This year the pesticide industry has focused on answering some of the concerns by developing new fluency agents to be used in planters. The study makes no connection between neonicotinoids found in surface waters and dwindling bee populations.

“We noticed higher levels of these insecticides after rain storms during crop planting, which is similar to the spring flushing of herbicides that has been documented in Midwestern U.S. rivers and streams,” said Michelle Hladik, USGS scientist and the report’s lead author. “In fact, the insecticides also were detected prior to their first use during the growing season, which indicates that they can persist from applications in prior years.’’

The study looked closely at Iowa’s 2013 corn and soybean growing season. USGS found spikes in the concentration of neonicotinoids at planting time. Much of that spike, the study said, coincided with a wet spring.

“Climatic conditions may have accentuated this pattern in 2013 as persistent wet conditions delayed the start of crop planting and compressed the planting season into a shorter-than-normal time window,” USGS said. “For example, during one week in mid-May, 55% of the corn was planted for the entire state, making this the second-highest amount of corn planted in a single week for Iowa over the last five years.”

Neonicotinoids follow the “classic spring flush phenomenon documented for herbicides in streams across the Midwestern U.S.,” according to the study. That is, concentrations of the insecticide increase “substantially” in May through June following applications at planting.

“While this insecticide pulse is likely related to the increased use of neonicotinoids via seed treatments, the lack of use information on a watershed scale inhibits clearly attributing seed treatments as the primary source of these neonicotinoid stream concentrations,” the report said.

A similar ‘spring flush’ has been documented with previously used insecticides in the Midwest, although at lower detection frequencies, the study said. The use of clothianidin, one of the chemicals studied on corn in Iowa alone, nearly doubled between 2011 and 2013, the study found.

Tyson Sells Poultry Business In Mexico And Brazil To JBS

Sao Paulo, Brazil (Dow Jones) – Brazilian meat processor JBS SA and its unit Pilgrim’s Pride said they reached an agreement to acquire poultry businesses in Mexico and Brazil from Tyson Foods Inc. for $575 million.

Of the transaction total, $400 million will be for Tyson Foods’ operations in Mexico and the rest for poultry businesses in Brazil. The total amount will be paid in cash, JBS said in a statement. The acquisition still must be approved by authorities.

JBS and Pilgrim’s Pride will add the acquired portfolio to their existing business, while Tyson cited a lack of scale in its decision to sell. “Although these are good businesses with great team members, we haven’t had the necessary scale to gain leading share positions in these markets,” said Donnie Smith, president and chief executive of Tyson Foods. “In the short term, we’ll use the sale proceeds to pay down debt associated with our acquisition of Hillshire Brands. Longer term, we remain committed to our international business and will continue to explore opportunities to extend our international presence.”

The Mexican business, known as Tyson de Mexico, is based in Gomez Palacio in North Central Mexico. It has three plants and and seven distribution centers and employs more than 5,400. Tyson’s Brazil operation, known as Tyson do Brasil, has three production plants, two in Santa Catarina and one in the state of Parana, and employs 5,000.

In recent years, JBS has expanded aggressively in a wave of acquisition. Earlier this year, JBS and Tyson waged an intense battle over Hillshire Brands Co. Tyson won the auction in early June with its offer of $63 a share, about a 70% premium to Hillshire’s valuation before the bidding began. Including the assumption of debt, the deal is valued at $8.55 billion.

East Texas Regional Forage Conference Set Aug. 28 in Henderson

Henderson – As in previous years, the focus of the upcoming East Texas Regional Forage Conference is about how producers can save money – just more so, said Randy Reeves, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agent for Harrison County. “For example, producers will hear from some of the best in the field on cost of raising their own replacement heifers versus purchasing them,” Reeves said.

The conference will be held Aug. 28, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Rusk County Youth Expo Center, 3303 Farm-to-Market Road 13 West, Henderson.

Registration is $15, with a deadline of Aug. 21. A printable registration form can be downloaded at http://harrison.agrilife.org/files/2014/05/etrfc1.pdf.

Alternately, participants may mail a check or money order with their name, address and phone number to: Rusk County Extension Office, c/o East Regional Forage Conference, 113 E. Fordall St., Henderson, TX 75652.

Holders of Texas Department of Agriculture private pesticide applicators licenses will have the opportunity to earn one continuing education unit in integrated pest management, Reeves said.

Conference topics and speakers will include:
• Cost of Developing vs. Purchasing Replacement Females, Stan Bevers, AgriLife Extension economist, Vernon.
• Current Clover Research in Overton and Clover Utilization in Winter Pastures, Dr. Ray Smith, Texas A&M AgriLife Research legume breeder, Overton.
• Manure Scoring to Determine Nutritional Needs in Beef Cattle, Dr. Robert Wells, livestock consultant with the Noble Foundation, Ardmore, Oklahoma.
• Herbicide Pasture Updates, Shane Colston, certified crop advisor with Winfield Solutions, Tyler.

The conference is jointly presented by AgriLife Extension offices in Gregg, Harrison, Panola, Rusk and Upshur counties, but producers from other counties and states are welcome to attend, Reeves said.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 39,800

Texas 11,500. 98 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 650 lbs 228.00; 725 lbs 218.00; 750-775 lbs 212.96; 800 lbs 205.89; 875 lbs 202.25; Sept 750 lbs Oct 675 lbs 222.85; 750-775 lbs 214.83; Del Current 750 lbs 216.70; 800-825 lbs 211.25; Sept 775 lbs 214.25; Nov 700 lbs 218.20; 750-775 lbs 214.02; 800 lbs 211.85; Jan 750 lbs 205.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725 lbs 209.27; 750-790 lbs 204.82; 800-825 lbs 202.27; 850 lbs 197.25; 950 lbs 187.60; Del Current 460 lbs 268.90 Mex Origin; 545 lbs 250.70 Mex Origin; 725 lbs 212.00; 825 lbs 207.50; 850 lbs 199.67; Sept 800 lbs 202.00; 850 lbs 207.12; 700-725 lbs 213.49; Nov 775 lbs 214.30. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs 205.37; Sept 675 lbs 209.65; 700-725 lbs 204.79; 775 lbs 213.25; Oct 650-675 lbs 211.10; 700-725 lbs 205.36; Nov 625 lbs 211.50; 675 lbs 206.00; 700 lbs 205.05; Del Current 700-725 lbs 205.58; Sept 700-725 lbs 208.82; Oct 675 lbs 211.00; 700-725 lbs 206.32. Medium and Large 12 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 197.50; Del Current 650 lbs 213.20; 700-740 lbs 203.91; Sept 675 lbs 211.40.

Oklahoma 2700. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 16 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 750-770 lbs 213.67; 800-825 lbs 209.36; 865-875 lbs 210.34. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700 lbs 205.28; Sept 700 lbs 208.30. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 740 lbs 198.16.

New Mexico 4900. 67 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current 725 lbs 210.76; 800 lbs 204.00. Holsteins: Large 3 Jan 300 lbs 256.44.

Kansas 1300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 21 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750 lbs 211.00; 750 lbs 215.00 calves; 800 lbs 212.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 725 lbs 214.00; 950 lbs 192.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB 700 lbs 207.00; Oct 700 lbs 206.50.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — July 25
National feeder cattle receipts: 122,500

Feeder cattle and calves sold $3-8 higher with the full advance on yearlings which were actually higher than two weeks ago and ended up gaining ground through last week’s knee-jerk correction. Calf sales were still slightly lower than the week after the 4th which led into last week’s divot in this summer’s steadily rising feeder cattle swing. Despite attempts by naysayers and techno-chart readers suffering from acrophobia (fear of heights), nothing trumps good ol’ supply and demand when tracking prices for publicly traded commodities. There is simply a larger desire to own additional levels of beef cattle and products than the current availability, at every level. Market ready fed cattle supplies are extremely tight and packers could no longer play coy as they were lighting up the phones of prospective sellers Wednesday night. By Friday, the direct slaughter cattle market was a full $9 higher than the previous week with late sales from $164-166. The rallying dressed beef market allowed this advance as boxed beef cut-outs gained $8-12 this week with good demand as wholesalers allowed themselves to get short-bought. On the Northern Livestock Video from Billings, MT the Galt Ranch from White Sulphur Springs sold near 600 head of Waygu X steer and heifer calves to weigh 435 lbs in late October for $402.50. On Wednesday, Bassett, NE quoted 136 head of fancy 600 lb steers at $300 and Thursday in Mitchell, SD they had nearly 400 head of Large frame and thin fleshed grass yearling steers weighing 1000-1100 lbs which averaged $206.39. Top selling new pickup accessories this year will include gooseneck balls, flat-beds, and bale spikes; rather than fuel tanks as crops and livestock rarely flourish at the same time. Friday’s cattle-on-feed report was bullish and added even more fuel to the fire with July 1st inventories less than expected at 97.6 percent of last year, while placements came in well under industry expectations at 93.8 percent of 2013, and fed marketings were slightly higher than thought at 98.2 percent of the same timer a year ago. The mid-year cattle inventory report showed 95 million total cattle which was down 3 percent from two years ago (latest available comparison). There were 29.7 million beef cows (also down 3 percent) and shockingly beef replacement heifers were down 2 percent from July 2012. The 2014 calf crop was projected to be down 1 percent from last year at 33.6 million head. This week’s reported auction volume included 43 percent over 600 lbs and 40 percent heifers.

Texas 3100. 53 pct over 600 lbs. 44 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 500-550 lbs (521) 250.23; 600-650 lbs (618) 228.16; 650-700 lbs (660) 224.06; pkg 800 lbs 209.00. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (317) 319.37; 350-400 lbs (379) 306.40; 500-550 lbs (525) 236.58; 550-600 lbs (575) 234.11; 600-650 lbs (621) 217.37; 650-700 lbs (675) 218.17; 700-750 lbs (726) 206.68; few loads 870 lbs 205.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 400 lbs 257.00; 550-600 lbs (572) 212.37; 600-650 lbs (621) 213.66; 650-700 lbs (696) 211.66; 800-850 lbs (825) 188.52. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (344) 283.73; 400-450 lbs (417) 251.87; 500-550 lbs (539) 214.87; 600-650 lbs (626) 202.94; 650-700 lbs (693) 201.32.

Oklahoma 16,300. 69 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 331.21; 350-400 lbs (382) 304.90; 400-450 lbs (429) 285.55; 450-500 lbs (476) 267.28; 500-550 lbs (528) 250.82; 550-600 lbs (577) 242.69; 600-650 lbs (629) 235.65; 650-700 lbs (674) 230.28; 700-750 lbs (724) 223.12; 750-800 lbs (764) 216.44; 800-850 lbs (828) 213.86; 850-900 lbs (871) 207.62; 900-950 lbs (923) 200.46; 950-1000 lbs (963) 194.23; 1000-1050 lbs (1042) 193.21; 1050-1100 lbs (1077) 189.18. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (477) 258.30; 500-550 lbs (526) 239.35; 550-600 lbs (588) 234.22; 600-650 lbs (627) 224.20; 650-700 lbs (685) 221.91; 700-750 lbs (728) 216.46; 750-800 lbs (775) 209.51; 800-850 lbs (836) 206.36; 850-900 lbs (876) 203.25; 900-950 lbs (917) 192.90; load 980 lbs 194.00. Holsteins: Large 3 load 545 lbs 195.00; part load 860 lbs 160.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 290.72; 350-400 lbs (377) 263.55; 400-450 lbs (427) 251.41; 450-500 lbs (475) 240.75; 500-550 lbs (520) 235.86; 550-600 lbs (575) 229.24; 600-650 lbs (629) 219.69; 650-700 lbs (677) 213.87; 700-750 lbs (725) 207.20; 750-800 lbs (765) 200.13; 800-850 lbs (822) 198.91; 850-900 lbs (881) 192.10; 900-950 lbs (918) 183.99; 950-1000 lbs (991) 173.42. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (482) 230.58; 500-550 lbs (522) 225.58; 550-600 lbs (571) 223.40; 600-650 lbs (631) 213.05; 650-700 lbs (684) 206.90; 700-750 lbs (732) 199.83; 750-800 lbs (771) 198.29; 800-850 lbs (828) 190.95; half load 875 lbs 184.50.

New Mexico 2100. 32 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (433) 265.01; 500-550 lbs (512) 249.02; 550-600 lbs (575) 238.53; 600-650 lbs (620) 229.77; 650-700 lbs (670) 219.15; 750-800 lbs (772) 196.66. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (481) 245.11; 500-550 lbs (527) 230.39; 550-600 lbs (577) 223.48; 600-650 lbs (629) 211.53. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (420) 260.54; 450-500 lbs (466) 225.59; 500-550 lbs (523) 229.29; 600-650 lbs (639) 205.61; 650-700 lbs (671) 190.00. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (531) 212.78.

Kansas 5400. 95 pct over 600 lbs. 32 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 550-600 lbs (572) 256.91; part load 670 lbs 243.00; 750-800 lbs (767) 224.98; pkg 830 lbs 217.75; 850-900 lbs (882) 213.70; 900-950 lbs (929) 211.22; 950-1000 lbs (961) 200.75; 1000-1050 lbs (1008) 201.82. Medium and Large 1-2 600-650 lbs (628) 241.67; 650-700 lbs (676) 237.22; 700-750 lbs (727) 223.16; 750-800 lbs (766) 212.12; 800-850 lbs (826) 214.33; 850-900 lbs (874) 211.48; 900-950 lbs (927) 210.64. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 500-550 lbs (538) 259.00; 550-600 lbs (590) 244.32; 600-650 lbs (637) 224.67; 650-700 lbs (685) 220.56; 700-750 lbs (730) 214.54; 750-800 lbs (764) 209.78; 800-850 lbs (827) 207.57; 850-900 lbs (856) 203.78; 900-950 lbs (943) 193.25; 1000-1050 lbs (1014) 190.87. Medium and Large 1-2 650-700 lbs (682) 210.93; 700-750 lbs (730) 210.50; 800-850 lbs (858) 198.00.

Missouri 17,200. 42 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 318.09; 350-400 lbs (376) 282.98; 400-450 lbs (428) 273.75; 450-500 lbs (473) 265.63; 500-550 lbs (523) 258.35; 550-600 lbs (576) 251.20; 600-650 lbs (620) 241.71; 650-700 lbs (681) 228.07; 700-750 lbs (722) 218.94; 750-800 lbs (767) 213.47; 800-850 lbs (826) 211.27; 850-900 lbs (870) 211.46; 900-950 lbs (923) 196.13. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (329) 291.29; 350-400 lbs (380) 271.70; 400-450 lbs (427) 254.43; 450-500 lbs (476) 254.28; 500-550 lbs (527) 243.93; 550-600 lbs (577) 234.76; 600-650 lbs (623) 228.65; 650-700 lbs (677) 215.59; 700-750 lbs (727) 210.35; 750-800 lbs (784) 200.80; 800-850 lbs (823) 199.43; 850-900 lbs (860) 198.08; 900-950 lbs (931) 197.67. Holsteins: Large 3 350-400 lbs (377) 205.63; 400-450 lbs (423) 203.13; 450-500 lbs (475) 197.74; 500-550 lbs (530) 189.74; 550-600 lbs (591) 172.37; 600-650 lbs (618) 186.56; 700-750 lbs (735) 174.81; 750-800 lbs (776) 169.17. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (265) 289.88; 300-350 lbs (324) 272.35; 350-400 lbs (373) 264.27; 400-450 lbs (430) 248.85; 450-500 lbs (468) 239.82; 500-550 lbs (528) 232.16; 550-600 lbs (574) 227.27; 600-650 lbs (626) 221.99; 650-700 lbs (672) 210.38; 700-750 lbs (723) 203.31; 750-800 lbs (763) 197.12. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (320) 257.90; 350-400 lbs (375) 252.90; 400-450 lbs (429) 231.12; 450-500 lbs (479) 229.98; 500-550 lbs (524) 223.32; 550-600 lbs (578) 219.48; 600-650 lbs (631) 210.27; 650-700 lbs (675) 201.54; 700-750 lbs (712) 190.66; 750-800 lbs (779) 189.64.

Arkansas 7700. 26 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 328.54; 350-400 lbs (375) 286.49; 400-450 lbs (424) 274.21; 450-500 lbs (472) 257.09; 500-550 lbs (524) 240.24; 550-600 lbs (570) 232.90; 600-650 lbs (620) 224.50; 650-700 lbs (670) 218.25; 700-750 lbs (715) 207.39; 750-800 lbs (761) 208.64; 800-850 lbs (818) 200.62. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 267.93; 350-400 lbs (374) 259.99; 400-450 lbs (425) 243.88; 450-500 lbs (471) 234.89; 500-550 lbs (522) 225.09; 550-600 lbs (570) 216.23; 600-650 lbs (625) 207.21; 650-700 lbs (673) 201.39; 700-750 lbs (719) 196.43; 750-800 lbs (787) 199.05.

 

 

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Thursday, July 31, 2014 1:18 PM