Five Myths Surrounding The Veterinary Feed Directive

By Leilana McKindra

Stillwater, Okla. – While it is true change can be a good thing, it rarely occurs without a learning curve. Not surprisingly, then, that is the case with the Veterinary Feed Directive after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently tightened the federal rule.
As of Jan. 1, producers must obtain an authorization or prescription to purchase medically important antibiotics and administer them to food animals through feed and drinking water.
Medically important antibiotics are medicines critical to treating human diseases.
Chris Richards, Oklahoma State University Extension and research beef cattle nutrition specialist, debunked five myths surrounding the VFD since the stricter rule went into effect this month.
Myth 1: Feed antibiotics will not be available to producers for their livestock.
Antibiotics will be available to producers for the treatment, prevention and control of disease.
“Producers will have to have a relationship with their veterinarian and get a VFD to use the feed antibiotics,” Richards said.
Myth 2: A VFD is required to feed any feed additives.
This can be true for producers feeding an antibiotic that requires a VFD.
When a veterinarian fills out the VFD authorization, there are three options – no additional feed additive included in the diet, feed additives listed on the VFD may be fed with the antibiotic or the antibiotic can be fed with any legal feed additives.
“As in the past, antibiotics have approved combinations with other drugs that still must be followed. The feeding of ionophores, coccidiostats, insect growth regulators, wormers and other such products will not require a VFD unless fed with an antibiotic that requires a VFD,” Richards said. “Many other feed additives such as probiotics and enzymes are not considered drugs and can be fed in any combination.”
Myth 3: My feed dealer will not be able to have my feed until I provide a VFD.
A feed dealer can make and warehouse feed that contains antibiotics. The dealer must have a valid VFD to sell that feed to a producer.
Myth 4: This is going to require a lot of paperwork.
“Many producers don’t feed antibiotics and won’t be affected by the regulations,” Richards said. “Most cow-calf producers who feed antibiotics and have a relationship with a veterinarian and feed dealer will find the process is easy to complete a couple times a year with their veterinarian.”
For most operations, attaching the VFD to the feed bill and keeping it with pertinent records will be acceptable documentation. Producers who feed antibiotics and buy and sell multiple lots of cattle will need to maintain records that also include information about the groups of animals fed and feeding dates.
Myth 5: Many animals will not have feed antibiotics available to them.
Feed antibiotics have always required being fed strictly by label directions and not even veterinarians could use them “off label.” This continues to be the case.
“Guidance documents have been released recently allowing some discretion on the part of veterinarians on use of these products in minor species such as goats, sheep, bees and lamas, that have few products available to them,” Richards said. “Veterinarians will have discretion to use feed antibiotics in minor species to prevent suffering and death.”
The FDA moved to strengthen the VFD in an effort to promote more judicious use of antibiotics in food animals.
Specifically, the regulation places restrictions on livestock usage of types of antibiotics that also are used in human medicine.
For more information on the VFD, visit www.fda.gov and search for “Veterinary Feed Directive” and contact the local county Extension office.

Cow Herd Expansion Will Keep Market Prices Lower

Waco – Cattle inventory across the U.S. will continue to expand and that will likely keep prices in moderation through 2017, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economist.
Dr. Jason Johnson, AgriLife Extension economist in Stephenville, discussed cattle market trends during the recent Blackland Income Growth Conference in Waco.
“There’s more cattle and cheaper prices,” Johnson said.
Cattle prices began a rapid downward spiral leading into the fall.
“It seems like we fell off a cliff fast,” he said. “We started building back the cow herd at about a 3 percent clip and then prices fell nearly 40 percent this year.”
Johnson said during 2015 when cattle prices hit historic highs, feedlot operators were bidding up on feeder cattle to keep pens full and operations going. Feedlots operate much like hotels, attempting to keep occupancy rates high.
“When they closed the books on those pens of cattle, they were losing $300 to $400 a head,” he said. “They started getting more judicious on what they paid for them in 2016. Overall, I think the bubble has been burst. We are now back down to more historic spread levels. I don’t think we will see another drop quite so dramatic as inventory and price expectations have returned to levels that should permit some participants at all levels of the supply chain to be profitable.”
Johnson said there will be buildups in cattle inventory over the next two to three years.
“That doesn’t mean that prices will continue to decline,” he said. “That dislocation of what feedlots were losing has gone away.”
Feedlot placements for 2016 have been on the increase, he said.
“You’ve got a pen of calves ready to market, do you take them to sell right now? I can tell you a lot of folks are holding back a little bit. But that can’t go on forever. There could be some spillage in the first quarter of 2017 and we could see some (more) downward prices.”
Other protein meats such as broilers and pork have increased production.
“Broiler production is at all-time highs. There’s a lot of protein on the market right now, as much as there has ever been. We also have a lot of beef.”
Johnson said there are export trade opportunities that will help market the excess beef. Japan, Canada, Mexico and South Korea are the current top U.S. export markets. With a new presidential administration, there could be further trade opportunities for beef.
Overall, steer prices in 2017 for 500- to 600-pound feeders will be $127-132 per hundredweight in the first quarter, $131-138 per hundredweight for the second quarter, $127-132 per hundredweight for the third quarter, and $122-132 per hundredweight for the fourth quarter, AgriLife Extension livestock economists project.
“We’re seeing slow and steady work down as prices slide,” Johnson said. “That’s attributed to the inventory build we expect to continue to see in 2017 and beyond. With lower prices, the impetus will be on the cow-calf producer to continue exploring ways to become more efficient in their operations.”

Joint Statement By OK Ag Organizations Regarding Employee Wrong-Doing At The Oklahoma Beef Counci

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma – As Oklahoma agriculture organizations, we wish to express our support for the Oklahoma Beef Council board of directors and staff. They have briefed us on the steps they have taken to address the matter of embezzlement by former employee. It is a highly unfortunate situation, but we are confident that the Oklahoma Beef Council has taken swift and aggressive action to correct this matter, seek justice and move forward with their mission of enhancing beef demand for producers.
The Oklahoma Beef Council is cooperating fully with authorities to ensure justice is delivered and restitution is sought. We appreciate the bravery and integrity of the Oklahoma Beef Council board of directors in reporting the fraud to authorities and taking the steps necessary to ensure justice is done for Oklahoma beef producers. This is a serious matter, but we must not let this distract us from continuing the good work of the Oklahoma Beef Council on behalf of beef producers-from investing in export markets to promoting US beef to educating medical professionals about beef nutrition and other industry issues.
We look forward to a successful resolution of the criminal investigation and will continue to support the Oklahoma Beef Council and the Beef Checkoff as they work through this.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 53,400

Texas 27,600. 98 pct over 600 lbs. 23 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 128.76; 800-835 lbs 128.79; 850-875 lbs 127.40; Feb 750-775 lbs 126.97; Mar 750 lbs 128.50; 825 lbs 120.50; Apr 800-825 lbs 121.60; 850 lbs 121.50; May 750-775 lbs 127.17; 800 lbs 123.35. Del Current 650 lbs 136.00; 725 lbs 132.78; 775 lbs 128.41; 825 lbs 134.57; 850 lbs 126.50; Jan-Feb 800 lbs 129.00; Feb 800 lbs 127.25; Mar 725 lbs 127.50; 775 lbs 125.00; 800 lbs 123.50; Apr 775 lbs 128.06; 800 lbs 120.75; May 725 lbs 131.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 575-585 lbs 143.98; 634 lbs 139.75; 650-700 lbs 133.32; 750-800 lbs 130.15; 800-850 lbs 123.77; 850-875 lbs 124.32; Feb 800 lbs 125.00; Del Current 600-650 lbs 141.97; 650 lbs 137.00; 700 lbs 132.00; 775-800 lbs 129.88; 800-825 lbs 130.45; 850 lbs 131.50; Jan-Feb 825 lbs 129.00; Feb 800-825 lbs 126.00. Medium and Large 2 FOB Current 680 lbs 125.10. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 120.22; Feb 725 115.75; Mar 675 lbs 119.90; 700 lbs 119.50; Apr 700 lbs 120.00; Del Current 610 lbs 131.00; 725 lbs 125.44; 750 lbs 125.00; Mar 675 lbs 122.88; 725 lbs 118.66; 750 lbs 118.50; May 700 lbs 121.50; June 700 lbs 121.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current FOB 650 lbs 118.25; 700-720 lbs 121.68; 790 lbs 120.50; Del Current 600 lbs 130.00; 750 lbs 127.11; Feb 775 lbs 123.00; Mar 725 lbs 116.70.
Oklahoma 2600. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 8 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 725 lbs 131.00; 825 lbs 128.50; 885 lbs 127.50; Feb 800 lbs 124.50; May 725 lbs 128.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 775 lbs 124.90; Mar 775 lbs 125.40; 800 lbs 120.50; Apr 775 lbs 122.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Mar 750 lbs 115.50; June 700 lbs 118.50.

New Mexico 1800. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 28 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 725 lbs 132.00; 775 lbs 126.00; 850 lbs 124.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 600 lbs 141.99; 675 lbs 132.34; 800-825 lbs 130.27; 850 lbs 130.81. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 725 lbs 123.00; Mar 725 lbs 116.25. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 750 lbs 125.40.

Kansas 4700. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 3 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 710 lbs 137.25; 750 lbs 134.00; 800-825 lbs 131.34; 850 lbs 126.50; 900 lbs 131.00; Feb 800 lbs 122.00; Mar 760 lbs 132.50; Del Current 740 lbs 137.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 650-685 lbs 136.55; 715-725 lbs 134.32; 750-775 lbs 133.44; 975 lbs 134.50; Feb 800 lbs 127.50; May 650 lbs 133.65; June 750 lbs 121.00; 825 lbs 119.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 825 lbs 123.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — January 13
National feeder cattle receipts: 367,500

Calves under 600 lbs sold unevenly steady ranging from steady to $4 higher to $4 lower with some spots $6-10 higher throughout all regions. Yearlings trading steady to $3 lower with some spots up to $6 lower. The first full week of direct trading occurred with most trends reported steady to $4 higher. Many producers have been waiting for this week to sell their spring born calf-crop, evidenced by the showing of nearly 500K head sold though auctions, directs and video sales this week. That is the second largest volume reported on this report in the last five years; only topped by week ending 7/17/2015 when nearly 2/3 of the reported receipts of 554,900 were video sales. Producers throughout the country have not liked the prices through fall and when December finally got here, most were prepared to carry cattle until the new year. Demand was good to very good this week in auctions as order buyers had plenty of orders to fill, especially Jan. 9-11 when several of the larger receipt auctions in the country took place. Even though there were plenty of cattle headed to feedyards, several auctions in the North Plains had heifers marked as Replacement on their market reports. On Jan. 11 in Kearney, NE at Huss-Platte Valley Livestock Auction, a half load of light 7-weight replacement quality heifers sold from $177.00-177.25 or just a tick over $1300/head average. Wow what a ticket! Fed cattle prices not established as of mid-day on Jan. 13 with feedyards wanting to push the market higher than the $117-118 live and $188 dressed market of last week. Some uncertain weather that is to roll into the Central Plains over the weekend may just keep the packers somewhat on the sidelines due to the extreme ice forecasted. Slaughter levels topped 600K again this week, with the packers picking up right where they left off after the holidays. Cattle slaughter for CY2016 reported at 30.1M head; nearly 2 million more than 2015 and 1 million under the previous 5 year average. CME Live Cattle futures closed the week $3.22-4.05 higher than last Jan. 6, with most of the gain coming from Jan. 9 and 10. Also, the Feeder Cattle contracts were $2.13-5.50 higher for the week with limit or near limit move ups on the March and April on Jan. 10. Choice Boxed beef values have eroded this week to the tune of $8.01 to close at $190.80. In addition, the Choice - Select spread has shrunk to around $4 after being near $10 at the turn of the year.

Texas 8500. 60 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct Heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (470) 153.45; 500-550 lbs (524) 144.31; 550-600 lbs (580) 141.50; 600-650 lbs (614) 136.05; 650-700 lbs (673) 137.07; 700-750 lbs (721) 133.82; 750-800 lbs (770) 131.14; 800-850 lbs (826) 130.21; 850-900 lbs (863) 127.96; 900-950 lbs (905) 126.72. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (526) 136.67; 550-600 lbs (561) 132.49; 600-650 lbs (624) 124.08; 650-700 lbs (674) 674; 700-750 lbs (708) 122.37; 800-850 lbs (816) 123.19. Medium and Large 2 450-500 lbs (469) 135.32; 500-550 lbs (519) 124.63; 550-600 lbs (577) 125.15; 600-650 lbs (623) 116.77; 650-700 lbs (679) 116.61. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (427) 138.50; 450-500 lbs (478) 134.34; 500-550 lbs (515) 128.92; 550-600 lbs (580) 124.73; 600-650 lbs (637) 129.19; 650-700 lbs (672) 126.92; 700-750 lbs (727) 126.27; 750-800 lbs (768) 125.99; 800-850 lbs (832) 119.21. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (429) 130.13; 450-500 lbs (481) 128.14; 500-550 lbs (531) 119.63; 550-600 lbs (576) 115.96; 600-650 lbs (627) 112.59; 650-700 lbs (666) 110.94; 700-750 lbs (734) 115.01; 750-800 lbs (774) 108.29.

Oklahoma 44,700. 58 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 183.20; Lot Fancy 309 lbs 199.00; 350-400 lbs (385) 176.44; 400-450 lbs (424) 173.12; 450-500 lbs (472) 164.13, thin 171.50; 500-550 lbs (518) 155.80, Lot Fancy 515 lbs 164.00; 550-600 lbs (574) 144.43; 600-650 lbs (623) 140.49; Calves 600-650 lbs (625) 134.29, Load Fancy 607 lbs 147.50; 650-700 lbs (677) 135.93; Calves 650-700 lbs (668) 131.98; 700-750 lbs (722) 132.66; Calves 700-750 lbs (721) 127.65; 750-800 lbs (772) 132.24; Calves 750-800 lbs (762) 126.20; 800-850 lbs (826) 131.64; 850-900 lbs (868) 127.37; 900-950 lbs (927) 124.26; 950-1000 lbs (980) 125.75; 1000-1050 lbs (1017) 121.10.Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (375) 162.77; 400-450 lbs (432) 158.78; 450-500 lbs (484) 150.28; 500-600 lbs (528) 144.89; 550-600 lbs (583) 134.81; 600-650 lbs (624) 135.52; 650-700 lbs (668) 126.29; 700-750 lbs (728) 128.73; 750-800 lbs (771) 126.47; 800-850 lbs (830) 124.22; 850-900 lbs (862) 123.37; 950-1000 lbs (956) 122.07. Holsteins: Large 3 750-800 lbs (765) 61.41. Heifers Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 157.16; 350-400 lbs (372) 147.42; 400-450 lbs (425) 139.50; 450-500 lbs (479) 135.99; 500-550 lbs (522) 131.72; 550-600 lbs (572) 129.50, Lot Fancy 562 lbs 138.00; 600-650 lbs (626) 128.00; Calves 600-650 lbs (625) 121.52; 650-700 lbs (677) 126.39; Calves 650-700 lbs (687) 122.09; 700-750 lbs (728) 127.06; Calves 700-750 lbs (731) 119.61; 750-800 lbs (763) 124.02; 800-850 lbs (822) 123.89, Load Thin 811 lbs 126.10; 850-900 lbs (871) 120.47; 900-950 lbs (928) 119.81; 950-1000 lbs (965) 117.59. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 151.27; 350-400 lbs (380) 143.15; 400-450 lbs (430) 129.88; 450-500 lbs (483) 128.50; 500-550 lbs (525) 125.39; 550-600 lbs (572) 122.58; 600-650 lbs (623) 124.11; 650-700 lbs (677) 124.85; 700-750 lbs (728) 117.76; 750-800 lbs (772) 121.70; 800-850 lbs (821) 119.29; 850-900 lbs (862) 120.45.

New Mexico 4900. 51 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (415) 170.34; 450-500 lbs (471) 158.76; 500-550 lbs (520) 149.32; 550-600 lbs (577) 134.04; 600-650 lbs (614) 135.99; 650-700 lbs (671) 132.30; 700-750 lbs (739) 129.70; 750-800 lbs (767) 128.85; few loads 840 lbs 129.50; pkg 940 lbs 118.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (434) 161.71; 450-500 lbs (482) 148.94; 500-550 lbs (529) 139.96; 550-600 lbs (582) 133.47; 600-650 lbs (624) 126.20; 650-700 lbs (683) 128.41; 700-750 lbs (741) 128.68. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (382) 145.90; 400-450 lbs (410) 143.01; 450-500 lbs (480) 134.99; 500-550 lbs (527) 126.21; 550-600 lbs (577) 116.25; 600-650 lbs (642) 129.04; 650-700 lbs (676) 127.33; 700-750 lbs (719) 117.44; load 880 lbs 115.00. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (380) 144.69; 400-450 lbs (423) 136.85; 450-500 lbs (480) 129.94; 500-550 lbs (526) 127.48; 550-600 lbs (582) 122.17; 600-650 lbs (633) 121.44.

Kansas 18,100. 82 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (420) 172.62; 450-500 lbs (477) 169.88; 500-550 lbs (525) 161.51; 550-600 lbs (571) 152.17; 600-650 lbs (623) 145.12; 650-700 lbs (670) 141.17; 700-750 lbs (726) 136.34; 750-800 lbs (768) 134.64; 800-850 lbs (871) 129.10; 900-950 lbs (916) 127.80; 950-1000 lbs (979) 127.19. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (481) 158.65; 500-550 lbs (541) 147.78; 550-600 lbs (586) 146.48; 600-650 lbs (634) 138.19; 650-700 lbs (687) 135.25; 700-750 lbs (726) 131.82; 750-800 lbs (786) 129.43; 800-850 lbs (826) 126.85; 850-900 lbs (876) 126.95; pkg 1040 lbs 122.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (336) 155.75; 350-400 lbs (386) 154.69; 400-450 lbs (423) 147.29; 450-500 lbs (475) 144.76; 500-550 lbs (528) 141.04; 550-600 lbs (578) 137.16; 600-650 lbs (625) 130.96; 650-700 lbs (678) 130.29; 700-750 lbs (723) 128.60; 750-800 lbs (775) 125.63; 800-850 lbs (821) 124.34; 850-900 lbs (870) 123.72; 900-950 lbs (912) 124.76. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (389) 143.49; 400-450 lbs (433) 141.41; 450-550 lbs (475) 138.45; 500-550 lbs (538) 132.60; 550-600 lbs (582) 130.16; 600-650 lbs (632) 126.19; 650-700 lbs (677) 124.88; 700-750 lbs (728) 124.66; 750-800 lbs (765) 123.94; 800-850 lbs (822) 122.32; 850-900 lbs (892) 120.29.

Missouri 47,400. 54 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 170.29; 350-400 lbs (380) 169.11; 400-450 lbs (426) 164.28; 450-500 lbs (479) 159.35; 500-550 lbs (525) 154.02; 550-600 lbs (572) 146.80; 600-650 lbs (624) 141.47; 650-700 lbs (671) 137.79; 700-72 lbs (721) 134.79; 750-800 lbs (775) 132.47; 800-850 lbs (821) 130.87; 850-900 lbs (872) 128.49; 900-850 lbs (913) 125.16; 950-1000 lbs (981) 125.07; 1000-1050 lbs (1056) 120.36. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (331) 168.19; 350-400 lbs (374) 155.02; 400-450 lbs (423) 154.07; 450-500 lbs (476) 148.18; 500-550 lbs (526) 142.76; 550-600 lbs (575) 137.86; 600-650 lbs (627) 133.45; 650-700 lbs (675) 129.05; 700-750 lbs (723) 128.58; 750-800 lbs (772) 126.93; 800-850 lbs (812) 123.33; 900-950 lbs (909) 122.04. Holsteins: Large 3 800-850 lbs (820) 73.99; 850-900 lbs (878) 67.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (334) 143.53; 350-400 lbs (373) 144.04; 400-450 lbs (425) 137.27; 450-500 lbs (476) 136.19; 500-550 lbs (524) 131.46; 550-600 lbs (573) 128.63; 600-650 lbs (623) 128.07; 650-700 lbs (670) 125.30; 700-750 lbs (722) 124.66; 750-800 lbs (765) 121.97; 800-850 lbs (814) 121.36; 950-1000 lbs (968) 113.21. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (334) 136.23; 350-400 lbs (381) 133.14; 400-450 lbs (423) 132.02; 450-500 lbs (476) 126.96; 500-550 lbs (525) 122.93; 600-650 lbs (619) 119.95; 650-700 lbs (673) 118.06; 700-750 lbs (727) 117.94; 750-800 lbs (768) 116.38; 800-850 lbs (834) 114.75.

Arkansas 7500. 29 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324)163.18; 350-400 lbs (372) 158.87; 400-450 lbs (422) 156.82; 450-500 lbs (473) 150.14; 500-550 lbs (519) 145.96; 550-600 lbs (572) 138.73; 600-650 lbs (627) 137.47; 650-700 lbs (671) 133.73. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 138.62; 350-400 lbs (374) 135.49; 400-450 lbs (427) 132.98; 450-500 lbs (475) 128.66; 500-550 lbs (524) 125.32; 550-600 lbs (568) 124.16; 600-650 lbs (624) 121.04; 650-700 lbs (666) 119.86.

 

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Friday, January 20, 2017 2:28 PM