Fire Relief Efforts For Beaver, Ellis, Harper & Woodward County Cattlemen

Oklahoma City, Okla. – A relief fund has been established by the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Foundation (OCF) to help Beaver, Ellis, Harper and Woodward County Cattlemen who have been affected by recent wildfires in the area.
“When unfortunate situations happen, it is humbling to see how generous folks can be to help those who are in need and we are happy to provide a place for those funds to be held,” said Jeff Jaronek, Coordinator of the OFC, a charitable arm of the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association. “We will coordinate with the Beaver, Ellis, Harper and Woodward County Extension to organize relief efforts in the area and to identify ranchers that are in need.”
If you would like to donate to this relief effort, you can do so by mail or online. Make checks payable to Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Foundation and put “Fire Relief” in the memo line and send to P.O. Box 82395, Oklahoma City, OK 73148. To donate online, visit www.okcattlemen.org.
“I know that many of my friends, neighbors and fellow cattlemen could use some help in recovering from this devastating wildfire,” said Tom Fanning of May, Okla. who is currently serving as the Northwest District Vice President of the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association (OCA). “In addition to the relief fund, hay donations would also be tremendously helpful.”
If you would like to donate hay or trucking services for hay, you can do so by contacting either the Harper County Extension Office at 580-735-2252 or Buffalo Feeders at 580-727-5530 to make arrangements or provide trucking services.
The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Foundation was founded in 1979 and is funded by personal contributions. The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association is the trusted voice of the Oklahoma Cattle Industry and exists to support and defend the state and nation’s beef cattle industry. The OCA officers, board of directors and membership encourages you to join us in our advocacy efforts to ensure less government intervention, lower taxes and a better bottom line. For more information about OCA membership or activities visit www.okcattlemen.org.

Farm Credit Coalition Meets With White House On Infrastructure

By Jerry Hagstrom
DTN Political Correspondent

Washington (DTN) – In what appears to be the Trump administration’s first White House meeting with rural groups, a coalition organized by the Farm Credit Council met with two National Economic Council members and two Agriculture Department officials March 9 to discuss rural infrastructure needs, Farm Credit Council CEO Todd Van Hoose said in an interview.
Other groups represented at the meeting were the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, the National Grain and Feed Association, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the National Rural Water Association and the Rural Broadband Association, Farm Credit said in a news release.
Van Hoose said he did not have permission to make the officials’ names public.
The meeting followed a letter that more than 200 rural groups sent President Donald Trump on Feb. 22 encouraging him to focus on infrastructure.
The meeting comes as the Trump administration is trying to develop plans to invest up to $1 trillion over 10 years on infrastructure projects around the country. Those plans, however, haven’t detailed how such investment will be paid, and the congressional committees that focus on infrastructure are just beginning to develop legislation as well.
Meanwhile, the American Society of Civil Engineers released its quadrennial assessment of infrastructure that highlighted the country has a $2 trillion investment gap over 10 years and gave the country overall a “D” grade in several key infrastructure categories, including highways, airports, public transit, inland waterways, drinking water, sewage treatment, energy, schools, hazardous waste and levees. Ports and bridge infrastructure scored C-plus grades.
The ASCE report card had several recommendations for upgrading infrastructure. That included ensuring dedicated funds for local, state and federal programs are adequately funded through user fees and those funds are not taken to offset other budget problems. Further, the federal 18.4 cent tax for gasoline and 24.4 cent tax on diesel should both be increased by at least 25 cents a gallon and tied to rates of inflation. (http://www.infrastrticturereportcard.org/)
Regarding the White House meeting, Van Hoose said in an interview that he came away from the meeting “impressed” by the officials’ grasp of rural infrastructure needs. The White House staff had “already thought through” how rural broadband needs are different from urban needs, he said, and could even talk about the number of rural water systems that are not up to a safe drinking standard.
The officials and the rural leaders also discussed transportation needs, how to get crops off the farm, and the need for improvements to surface transportation, rails, locks and dams and ports, Van Hoose said.
The officials did not discuss a specific piece of legislation or how the White House would propose to pay for the infrastructure improvements, Van Hoose said.
“We didn’t get into that kind of detail,” he said.
The administration officials “are looking at this in a couple different ways,” Van Hoose said, focusing on projects and how regulations can be reduced to speed up the projects, things that could be done without legislation.
Farm Credit’s role at the meeting was one of “convener,” Van Hoose said, and the organization, which represents the Farm Credit System institutions in Washington, does not have a list of regulations that should be reduced.
“This was the first of many meetings to come,” Van Hoose said. “They are very focused on rural down there.”
In a news release, Van Hoose said, “We are grateful that the White House is exploring the unique infrastructure needs of U.S. agriculture and rural communities.”
“Rural communities rely on clean water, affordable power and broadband internet to attract new jobs and provide a good quality of life,” he said. “Our agricultural competitiveness requires upgrades in transportation infrastructure to get supplies to farmers and to move farm products to markets around the U.S. and overseas.
“This coalition of more than 200 organizations came together because the needs of rural America are great and differ from urban projects. We look forward to working together with the Trump administration and Congress on behalf of rural communities and agriculture.”

2017 Cattle Raisers Convention Scheduled For March 31 – April 2 In San Antonio

Fort Worth, Texas – The Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) announced that the 140th annual Cattle Raisers Convention and Expo, the biggest ranching industry event in Texas and Oklahoma, is scheduled for March 31 – April 2, 2017 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas.
Douglas Holtz-Eakin, American Action Forum president, former director of the Congressional Budget Office and the former chief economist of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, will be the keynote speaker at the opening general session. Dr. Holtz-Eakin will discuss how the new Presidential administration will likely act on policy priorities such as international trade, domestic energy, immigration and healthcare. His remarks will focus on how these positions may impact ranchers in the future.
Randy Blach, CEO of CattleFax, will discuss the cattle markets and provide guidance on what ranchers can expect from livestock supplies, consumer demand and cattle prices.
Information sessions will feature experts on critical ranching topics such as eminent domain, international trade and export markets, differing perspectives on antimicrobial resistance, the 2017 state legislative session and a look ahead to what we can expect from weather patterns for the balance of 2017.
Additionally, the School for Successful Ranching and issues sessions will feature more than 33 hours of educational programs and a world-class lineup of subject matter experts who will provide insights into current ranching topics and practical tools attendees can take back to their ranch. Dr. Clay Mathis, Professor and Director, King Ranch Institute for Ranch Management will keynote the opening session of the school by discussing how to make the cow herd adapt to the continued demand for beef and be more efficient by 2037.
The Cattle Raisers Dinner and Dance will be held at the newly renovated Mays Family Center at the Witte Museum and will feature great food and entertainment by Jake Hooker and the Outsiders.
The Closing General Session Brunch will feature Taya Kyle, wife of the late U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle and author of the New York Times bestselling book, American Wife. Mrs. Kyle will deliver a unique message of love, faith, and inspiration.
The Cattle Raisers Expo is the largest annual ranching exposition in the region and will play host to more than 250 companies bringing the newest products and services to ranchers and landowners. The Expo will host live cattle handling demonstrations, which will take place inside the convention center. The demonstrations will teach attendees how to handle cattle in a safe, low-stress manner.
Rounding out the program are numerous entertainment and special interest options such as the Law Enforcement Silent Auction, Young Cattle Raisers’ After Party, Texas Beef Council Fun Run and Walk, Texas Cattlewomen annual meeting, Young Leadership Series forum, and Cow Camp for the younger attendees.
“We’re looking forward to another great Cattle Raisers Convention,” said Richard Thorpe, TSCRA president. “The unique combination of speakers and educational programs, focused on issues of importance to ranchers, makes this a can’t-miss event for any cattle raiser or landowner.”
The Cattle Raisers Convention and Expo is open to all ranchers, landowners and cattle industry participants. Day registration begins at only $90. Full details on registration and lodging options are available at www.cattleraisersconvention.com.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 61,500

Texas 25,300. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 50 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 650 lbs 135.50; 700-730 lbs 127.79; 750-775 lbs 124.97; 800-825 lbs 122.77; 850 lbs 118.44; Apr 750 lbs 122.85; 800 lbs 120.0; May 750-775 lbs 123.43; 800 lbs 120.30; June 650 lbs 132.00; July 800 lbs 120.95; Del Current 535 lbs 162.00; 775 lbs 127.74; 800 lbs 125.25; 850 lbs 123.00; May 800-825 lbs 121.33; Aug 775 lbs 125.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 635 lbs 137.00; 650-675 lbs 134.46; 725 lbs 127.00; 775-795 lbs 121.86, Mex 775 lbs 119.10; 800-810 lbs 119.38; 850-875 lbs 116.87; Mar-Apr 725 lbs 129.25; Apr 665 lbs 129.50; 750 lbs 126.00; May 775 lbs 121.60; June 675 lbs 128.90; Del Current 700-735 lbs 130.08; 750-800 lbs 126.07; 800 lbs 125.98; 875 lbs 121.00; 900-905 lbs 120.01; Aug 800 lbs 126.40; Sept 800 lbs 124.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 640-645 lbs 124.23; 700-725 lbs 117.91; 750-770 lbs 116.87; 825 lbs 116.25; Apr 700 lbs 116.75; 765-775 lbs 116.06; May 675 lbs 120.65; 725 lbs 115.80; June 650 lbs 123.00; 700 lbs 118.50; Del Current 525 lbs 146.00; 630-640 lbs 127.01; 650-675 lbs 125.51; 720-725 lbs 120.79; 760 lbs 118.00; Apr 725 lbs 121.40; May 725 lbs 118.97; 750 lbs 117.00; June 700 lbs 119.40; Aug 650 lbs 126.40. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 635 lbs 126.65; 650 lbs 120.25; 730 lbs 116.20; 765 lbs 116.00; Del Current 700-730 lbs 122.40; 750-775 lbs 118.50; Aug 650 lbs 126.35.

Oklahoma 3900. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725-735 lbs 128.81; 775 lbs 128.00; 800-830 lbs 123.30; 850 lbs 121.00; Del 800 lbs 126.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 690 lbs 134.24; 825 lbs 118.50; Del 775 lbs 124.75, 124.00 Mex. Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 675 lbs 125.09; 725 lbs 119.78; 750 lbs 116.69; June 700 lbs 116.92; Del 765-770 lbs 119.50; 825 lbs 116.80.

New Mexico 1500. 37 pct over 600 lbs. 55 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 535 lbs 161.20. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 800 lbs 122.43; 875 lbs 119.87; 900 lbs 118.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 525 lbs 145.20. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 700 lbs 120.00; 775 lbs 115.85.

Kansas 2800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 10 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 800 lbs 125.00; Del 725 lbs 133.00; 800 lbs 126.50. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 760 lbs 125.00; 725 lbs 123.00; Apr 750 lbs 124.50; May 750 lbs 128.00; June 675 lbs 132.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 760 lbs 116.00; Del 675 lbs 127.00; 725 lbs 121.50.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — March 10
National feeder cattle receipts: 256,300

Steer and heifer calves sold mostly steady to $5 higher, with instances $1-2 lower in the north central. Feeder steers and heifers traded uneven, seeing prices $3 lower to $5 higher. Demand continues to be very good for grazing calves, as cattle raisers are eager to turn their cattle out on grass. Due to limited numbers, premiums were paid for good quality, long-time weaned calves with all their shots; with discounts placed on fleshy, un-weaned soft bawling calves. In a few sale barns 300 lb steer and bull calves started to break the $2 mark, as buyers are willing to pay more for these cattle if they have the right condition. Early in the week, severe thunderstorms swept through the Plains and Midwest, knocking out power and causing substantial damage to structures. Some areas reported heavy rain, which was beneficial to pastures as many regions in the mid-section of the country are dry. High winds, with gusts up to 70 MPH, and tornados were reported in portions of the affected area. In the southern plains, brush fires continue to burn, with thousands of acres burned and livestock lost. The area is hoping for some relief, with moisture forecasted as we head into the weekend. Another front is projected for the weekend, with snow expected. In parts of the north receipts were limited due to inclement weather. On the other hand, demand for feeders is moderate to good. The cash slaughter cattle market continues to trade at a double digit premium to the April live cattle contract. The June contract and later months are mostly at a double digit discount to April, making feeder buyers cautious as they purchase cattle. Slaughter cattle continue to receive support from higher boxed beef prices, a decline in carcass weights, feedlots staying current and good demand for beef exports and the domestic market. The beef retail department is finding that lower prices are driving a greater willingness for premium beef products to be purchased by consumers and retail ads are full of beef promotions as beef regains favor with consumers. The unusually warm winter has wheat pastures maturing ahead of schedule. Many of the cattle coming off wheat came in earlier than usual and are tipping the scales between 800-1000 lbs. Many are thinking the run is near for cattle coming off wheat. In the feedlot trade on March 5, live cattle in the Texas Panhandle traded mostly steady to $1 higher at $125. In Kansas live cattle sales were mostly steady at $125. In Nebraska live purchases traded $1-2 higher from $126-127 and dressed sales were steady to $2 higher from $200-202. Colorado live sales were steady to $1 higher from $125-126. In the Western Corn-belt live sales traded $2-4 higher from $127-128 and dressed sales were $2 higher at $202.

Texas 8500. 70 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (463) 169.89; 500-550 lbs (520) 151.72; 550-600 lbs (575) 151.88; 600-650 lbs (632) 139.66; 650-700 lbs (664) 138.01; 700-750 lbs (730) 131.12; 750-800 lbs (767) 128.45; 800-850 lbs (820) 125.32; 850-900 lbs (868) 121.36. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (490) 143.66; 500-550 lbs (530) 140.17; 550-600 lbs (583) 132.09; 600-650 lbs (621) 131.05; 650-700 lbs (693) 131.28; 700-750 lbs (720) 122.30; 750-800 lbs (782) 125.76; few loads 840 lbs 118.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (362) 159.48; 400-450 lbs (422) 153.53; 450-500 lbs (464) 147.66; 500-550 lbs (524) 138.29; 550-600 lbs (572) 133.56; 600-650 lbs (626) 121.06; 650-700 lbs (682) 123.18; 700-750 lbs (728) 117.68; 750-800 lbs (782) 115.86; 800-850 lbs (813) 116.91. Medium and Large 12 500-550 lbs (525) 128.69; 550-600 lbs (576) 120.69; 600-650 lbs (627) 118.11; 650-700 lbs (687) 114.61.

Oklahoma 40,400. 76 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (335) 190.24; 350-400 lbs (377) 185.46; 400-450 lbs (417) 182.61; 450-500 lbs (477) 170.24; 500-550 lbs (524) 161.94; 550-600 lbs (573) 154.04; 600-650 lbs (619) 147.57; 650-700 lbs (673) 140.49; 700-750 lbs (727) 133.94; 750-800 lbs (772) 128.03; 800-850 lbs (826) 123.91; 850-900 lbs (878) 120.78; 900-950 lbs (913) 118.89; 950-1000 lbs (966) 117.26. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 189.37; 350-400 lbs (372) 178.62; 400-450 lbs (434) 174.71; 450-500 lbs (469) 163.83; 500-550 lbs (576) 145.29; 550-600 lbs (576) 145.29; 600-650 lbs (627) 139.64; 650-700 lbs (674) 135.91; 700-750 lbs (722) 130.51; 750-800 lbs (789) 122.08; 800-850 lbs (821) 121.91; 850-900 lbs (870) 118.43; 900-950 lbs (936) 116.27; 950-1000 lbs (976) 116.18. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 156.29; 350-400 lbs (369) 157.25; 400-450 lbs (433) 147.54; 450-500 lbs (476) 144.06; 500-550 lbs (521) 140.93; 550-600 lbs (571) 135.68; 600-650 lbs (621) 131.44; 650-700 lbs (679) 123.54; 700-750 lbs (723) 120.77; 750-800 lbs (774) 118.13; 800-850 lbs (818) 117.19; 850-900 lbs (877) 117.21; 900-950 lbs (926) 115.14; 950-1000 lbs (969) 114.06. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (333) 153.55; 350-400 lbs (372) 153.05; 400-450 lbs (421) 144.45; 450-500 lbs (478) 137.37; 500-550 lbs (526) 136.53; 550-600 lbs (578) 126.26; 600-650 lbs (626) 125.27; 650-700 lbs (674) 119.44; 700-750 lbs (721) 119.52; 750-800 lbs (780) 115.71; 800-850 lbs (825) 114.17; 850-900 lbs (851) 113.76.

New Mexico 3700. 63 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 500-550 lbs (518) 157.36; 550-600 lbs (570) 146.03; 600-650 lbs (622) 140.78; 650-700 lbs (677) 131.59; 700-750 lbs (716) 129.40; 750-800 lbs (780) 122.53; 800-850 lbs (819) 121.59. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (424) 183.31; 450-500 lbs (469) 174.31; 500-550 lbs (523) 154.17; 550-600 lbs (566) 143.22; 600-650 lbs (616) 139.12; 650-700 lbs (666) 131.67; 700-750 lbs (713) 127.36. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (412) 161.41; 450-500 lbs (479) 143.53; 500-550 lbs (522) 141.16; 550-600 lbs (571) 131.07; 600-650 lbs (620) 124.35; 650-700 lbs (674) 119.57; 700-750 lbs (715) 116.88. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (366) 165.65; 400-450 lbs (430) 150.72; 450-500 lbs (471) 141.95; 500-550 lbs (524) 135.15; 550-600 lbs (575) 126.25; 650-700 lbs (666) 118.89.

Kansas 15,400. 89 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (415) 184.77; 450-500 lbs (482) 176.76; 500-550 lbs (522) 167.73; 550-600 lbs (569) 161.39; 600-650 lbs (624) 146.39; 650-700 lbs (667) 143.35; 700-750 lbs (721) 133.61; 750-800 lbs (780) 129.41; 800-850 lbs (823) 126.49; 850-900 lbs (876) 123.92; 900-950 lbs (921) 120.49; 950-1000 lbs (971) 119.19; 1000-1050 lbs (1041) 118.97; 1050-1100 lbs (1067) 116.42. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (390) 168.54; 450-500 lbs (474) 164.93; 500-550 lbs (528) 156.87; 550-600 lbs (575) 153.35; 600-650 lbs (629) 139.88; 650-700 lbs (685) 137.19; 700-750 lbs (737) 129.15; 750-800 lbs (779) 125.33; 800-850 lbs (829) 123.22; 850-900 lbs (877) 119.84; 900-950 lbs (936) 116.50; 950-1000 lbs (987) 116.22; 1050-1100 lbs (1092) 112.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (404) 161.00; 450-500 lbs (477) 147.64; 500-550 lbs (538) 141.81; 550-600 lbs (570) 140.42; 600-650 lbs (629) 126.35; 650-700 lbs (675) 125.32; 700-750 lbs (729) 124.95; 750-800 lbs (780) 122.18; 800-850 lbs (822) 119.32; 850-900 lbs (861) 117.89; 900-950 lbs (909) 116.87; 950-1000 lbs (952) 116.50. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (439) 153.55; 450-500 lbs (467) 142.27; 500-550 lbs (532) 138.48; 550-600 lbs (577) 130.19; 600-650 lbs (616) 124.76; 650-700 lbs (683) 121.39; 700-750 lbs (743) 120.53; 750-800 lbs (777) 118.82; 800-850 (821) 116.41; 850-900 lbs (857) 114.92.

Missouri 31,400. 52 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 177.89; 350-400 lbs (376) 175.63; 400-450 lbs (430) 171.43; 450-500 lbs (479) 168.02; 500-550 lbs (530) 160.18; 550-600 lbs (573) 152.02; 600-650 lbs (627) 145.83; 650-700 lbs (678) 138.21; 700-750 lbs (725) 133.54; 750-800 lbs (780) 127.47; 800-850 lbs (825) 122.29; 850-900 lbs (871) 120.42; 900-950 lbs (925) 118.76. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (330) 165.71; 350-400 lbs (377) 163.36; 400-450 lbs (427) 156.20; 450-500 lbs (476) 155.29; 500-550 lbs (529) 150.19; 550-600 lbs (571) 144.15; 600-650 lbs (625) 136.33; 650-700 lbs (677) 130.35; 700-750 lbs (730) 124.90; 750-800 lbs (773) 120.51; 800-850 lbs (824) 120.65; 850-900 lbs (866) 120.41; 900-950 lbs (918) 114.72; 950-1000 lbs (977) 114.45. Holsteins: Large 3 400-450 lbs (424) 81.21; 450-500 lbs (479) 84.54; 500-550 lbs (522) 80.58; 550-600 lbs (564) 82.81; 600-650 lbs (639) 71.38; 650-700 lbs (684) 75.03; 700-750 lbs (722) 72.61; 750-800 lbs (769) 68.38; 850-900 lbs (884) 70.02; load 1010 lbs 69.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 154.16; 350-400 lbs (375) 151.75; 400-450 lbs (426) 144.98; 450-500 lbs (473) 141.37; 500-550 lbs (524) 137.67; 550-600 lbs (574) 132.08; 600-650 lbs (626) 129.05; 650-700 lbs (671) 125.56; 700-750 lbs (727) 119.75; 750-800 lbs (777) 117.54; 800-850 lbs (825) 116.37; 850-900 lbs (871) 113.02. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (333) 145.09; 350-400 lbs (370) 143.36; 400-450 lbs (429) 136.39; 450-500 lbs (477) 133.85; 500-550 lbs (518) 131.92; 550-600 lbs (577) 124.65; 600-650 lbs (620) 123.76; 650-700 lbs (669) 122.21; 700-750 lbs (722) 116.08; 750-800 lbs (772) 116.98; 800-850 lbs (837) 113.16.

Arkansas 5700. 24 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 186.64; 350-400 lbs (373) 174.40; 400-450 lbs (421) 166.93; 450-500 lbs (472) 159.33; 500-550 lbs (520) 152.64; 550-600 lbs (573) 146.69; 600-650 lbs (623) 140.71; 650-700 lbs (678) 133.42. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 159.55; 350-400 lbs (375) 153.03; 400-450 lbs (420) 144.62; 450-500 lbs (470) 140.90; 500-550 lbs (527) 135.18; 550-600 lbs (567) 129.10; 600-650 lbs (620) 122.26; 650-700 lbs (668) 120.38.

 

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Friday, March 17, 2017 10:09 AM