Interpretation Of Controlled Substances Act Changing

By Victoria G. Myers
Progressive Farmer Senior Editor

Veterinarians can start breathing a little easier now when they go to work, without the fear that they might be arrested for carrying controlled substances out of their clinics to treat sick or dying animals. The Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act has passed Congress and only needs President Barack Obama’s signature to become law.

The Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act, sponsored by Kurt Schrader, D-Ore., and Ted Yoho, R-Fla., both veterinarians in the House; as well as Jerry Moran, R-Kan., and Angus King, I-Maine, in the Senate, makes it legal for veterinarians to transport and use controlled substances beyond their registered places of business. It also allows veterinarians to be registered to work in multiple states, regardless of their principle place of business.

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has been actively working to get this legislation through Congress since the issue arose in 2012.

The need for the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act became clear when California’s Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) began to contact veterinarians in the state and inform them they could not legally transport controlled substances off of their clinic/home premises. This was, according to the DEA’s interpretation, a violation of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

In a story last year, DTN reported that Dr. Thomas W. Graham of Davis, Calif., told the AVMA he had been contacted by the DEA and had stopped carrying pentobarbital, diazepam, xylazine and butorphanol in his vehicle because he was told it was illegal. Graham was a large animal vet, described as a “bovine practitioner.”

Rep. Schrader expressed anger at the time that the DEA did not use what he called “common sense” in their interpretation of the CSA. He said: “Not a single member of Congress intended the CSA to be used as a means of restricting the practice of mobile vets. The DEA has no clue what it means to drive the countryside providing veterinary care and protecting our food supply.”

With the passage of the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act in the House on July 8, Rep. Schrader said there is “a victory for veterinarians across the country, but more importantly it’s a victory for the health and well-being of the animals they are entrusted to care for. Ridiculous bureaucratic interference from the DEA would have seriously impeded veterinarians’ ability to properly treat their patients.”

Rep. Yoho said that during his time as a large animal veterinarian, his operating room wasn’t always in an office. “Most times, it was in the field,” he said. “Expecting ranchers to transport their livestock to a veterinary clinic every time medication is needed is an example of overly burdensome policy created by bureaucrats rather than the folks who know the issue. This bill will correct that problem and allow veterinarians to practice their profession without fear of unnecessary government intrusion.”

Cattlemen’s College During The OCA Convention & Trade Show, July 24, 25 & 26

Oklahoma City, Okla. – The 62nd Annual Convention and Trade Show of the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association will take place on July 24-26 at the Reed Conference Center in Midwest City, Okla.

“Carry on the Legacy” is the theme for the 62nd annual event. An exciting piece of the convention will be the Cattlemen’s College sessions. Cattlemen’s College will provide participants opportunities to hear presentations pertaining to important information and issues.

“Each year, the topics for the sessions are chosen based upon real challenges or situations that ranchers must work through daily. It is our goal to highlight specific issues and facilitate discussion,” said Richard Gebhart, OCA President.

Five Cattlemen’s College sessions have been coordinated. Convention registration includes passes to all Cattlemen’s College sessions. To register and learn more, visit www. okcattlemen.org. Pre-registration is encouraged, on-site registration available.

Cattlemen’s College Sessions and Topics are as follows:
Session 1Thursday, July 24th at 2:00 pm
Cattle Market Outlook – Mr. Jim Robb, Livestock Marketing Information Center
Oklahoma Beef Council Update – Mrs. Heather Buckmaster, Oklahoma Beef Council
Session 2Thursday, July 24th at 3:30 pm
Growing Profits with Modern Forages – Mr. Mark Thomas, Johnston Seed
Beef Cattle Short Courses – Rapid Fire mini sessions (each speaker has five minutes with a panel Q&A to follow after all presentation are completed)
• Dr. Justin Talley, Oklahoma State University – “Grasshopper control”
• Mr. Joshua Gaskamp, Noble Foundation – “Thinking Outside the Box Trap”
• Ms. LJ Bernhard, Oklahoma State University – “What is Student Success?”
• Dr. Ryan Reuter, Noble Foundation – “Stacked Technologies for Stocker Cattle”
• Dr. Chris Richards, Oklahoma State University – “Mesonet Cattle Comfort Advisor”
Session 3Friday, July 25th at 7:00 am (early morning coffee session)
Oklahoma Brand Law
• Mr. Jerry Flowers, ODAFF Chief Investigator
• Dr. Alicia Borczya-Southerland, ODAFF Animal Health Division
Session 4 Friday, July 25th at 1:00 pm
Wind Energy in Oklahoma
• Mr. Steve Vavrick, COO, APEX Wind Energy
• Mr. Chris Tytanic, JD, Adjunct Professor at OCU School of Law and OU College of Law
Session 5Saturday, July 26th at 10:30 am
National Election Update and Issues Important to Beef Cattle producers – Mr. Colin Woodall, NCBA Vice President of Government Affairs

The OCA represents more than 5,500 Oklahoma ranching families. The OCA exists to support and defend the state and nation’s beef cattle industry. The OCA officers, board of directors and membership encourages you to join us in our advocacy efforts to ensure less government intervention, lower taxes and a better bottom line. For more information about OCA membership, the theft reward program or activities call 405-235-4391 or visit www.okcattlemen.org.

Environmental Law Enforcement Training Slated In Perkins, OK

By Trisha Gedon

Stillwater, Okla. – If you take a drive down the back roads of Oklahoma, it is likely you will find an illegal dump site. While they are unsightly, illegal and can cause damage to the environment, they also are unattractive to those who already live in or might choose to move into a community.

In an effort to help prevent these dump sites from popping up, the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are joining forces to host Environmental Law Enforcement Trainings around the state. The next training is slated July 24 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and will take place at the Vassar Community Center, located within the Oklahoma Territorial Plaza, 750 N. Main, Perkins. The workshop is limited to 25 participants.

Michael Freeman, senior criminal investigator with the ODEQ, will be the law enforcement presenter. He will speak about agency jurisdictions and environmental crime statutes, and give an overview of illegal dumping and environmental crime awareness.

Lynn Malley, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension assistant state specialist, solid waste management programs, will present information about Extension and the roles citizens can take in helping to control illegal dumping.

Malley said the workshop is open to all citizens and recommended it for anyone interested in environmental law or those with a responsibility for preventing illegal dumping in their county.

“We encourage law enforcement officers, tribal environmental representatives, county commissioners, city officials and local citizens to attend,” Malley said. “Illegal dump sites have been an increasing problem across the state for several years and cost taxpayers thousands of dollars to clean up.”

In addition, illegal dump sites can cause contamination of soil, ground water, drinking water wells, streams and rivers. Other side effects include possible injury to children playing on or around the dump site, damage to plant and wildlife habitats and decrease in the quality of life to nearby residents and the local community.

At the training, participants will learn about illegal dumping and other environmental crimes, investigation and enforcement responsibilities and prevention resources.

The training is free and lunch is $10 if registered by July 21. Registration may be done online on the OSU Solid Waste Management Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ OkstateSolidWasteManagement or the website at www.agecon.okstate.edu/waste. For additional information please contact Malley at lynn.malley@okstate.edu.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 86,200

Texas 25,700. 97 pct over 600 lbs. 54 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 212.69; 800-825 lbs 204.35; Nov 750 lbs 215.00; Delivered Aug 750 lbs 217.60; Sept 675 lbs 225.00; 725 lbs 219.00; 750 lbs 218.75; Oct 675 lbs 225.00; 750-775 lbs 214.60; 800 lbs 211.50; Nov 725 lbs 218.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 705 lbs 210.71; 750-770 lbs 206.30; Aug 850 lbs 202.45; Jan 500 lbs 219.90; Feb 500 lbs 219.90; Mar 500 lbs 219.90; Delivered Current 650 lbs 200.00; Nov 775 lbs 214.60. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 625 lbs 220.90; 650 lbs 214.00; 700-735 lbs 205.59; Sept 700-725 lbs 206.87; 750 lbs 207.75; Oct 700 lbs 210.00; Nov 205.20; Delivered Current 650 lbs 216.00; Aug 700 lbs 209.60; Sept 650 lbs 217.00; 700-725 lbs 210.38; Oct 650 lbs 217.00; 700-725 lbs 210.37; Nov 700-725 lbs 206.40. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 750 lbs 190.24; Aug 750 lbs 202.45; Jan 500 lbs 219.90; Feb 500 lbs 219.90; Mar 500 lbs 219.90; Delivered Current 550 lbs 200.00. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 210.38; 800-835 lbs 202.74; Aug 775 lbs 211.00; 750-775 lbs 210.48; Nov 775 lbs 210.25; Jan 775 lbs 205.50; Delivered Current 750-775 lbs 210.88; 800-825 lbs 205.30; 875 lbs 203.25; Aug 750-775 lbs 214.94; Sept 725 lbs 216.75; 750-775 lbs 216.41; Dec 700 lbs 211.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 635 lbs 219.40; 675-700 lbs 212.58; 705-725 lbs 209.47; 760 lbs 202.60; 850 lbs 208.75; Nov 700 lbs 212.60; Dec 500 lbs 224.90; Delivered Current 600 lbs 205.00; 765-775 lbs 208.52; 890 lbs 197.00; Nov 775 lbs 207.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 203.00; Aug 700-725 lbs 201.69; Sept 650 lbs 211.80; 700-725 lbs 203.91; Oct 600-625 lbs 214.40; 650-675 lbs 210.71; 700-725 lbs 204.25; Nov 700 lbs 203.30; Delivered Current 700-725 lbs 204.36; Aug 650 lbs 209.25; 700-725 lbs 207.53; Sept 650-675 lbs 210.37; 700-725 lbs 209.38; Oct 700-725 lbs 207.29; Nov 700 lbs 206.75. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Dec 500 lbs 214.90; Delivered Current 600 lbs 200.00; 685 lbs 200.00; Aug 675 lbs 208.75; Oct 700 lbs 206.25. Basis Trades 600 head steers and 100 head heifers. Steers: Delivered Price 750 lbs 4.50 under Oct CME; 825 lbs 7.00 under Aug CME; 800 lbs 5.00 under Oct CME. Heifers: Delivered Price 775 lbs 16.00 under Aug CME.

Oklahoma 4300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 30 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 640 lbs 234.00; 750 lbs 216.81; 800-825 lbs 210.51; 875 lbs 203.00; Sept 675 lbs 222.00; Oct 250 lbs 213.00; 675 lbs 222.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 600 lbs 220.00; 650 lbs 218.81; Sept 700-725 lbs 206.97; Oct 650 lbs 650 lbs 214.00; 725 lbs 205.00; Nov 650 lbs 214.00. Week ending 07-04-2014. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 800 lbs 203.14; 850 lbs 204.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 750-775 lbs 208.21. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700-725 lbs 198.77; Sept 675 lbs 207.25; 700 lbs 206.65. Medium and Large 2 Current 725 lbs 184.16.

New Mexico 5700. 92 pct over 600 lbs. 69 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Aug 750 lbs 216.60; Sept 725 lbs 217.00; 750 lbs 217.75; Oct 750 lbs 217.75. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Aug 700 lbs 208.60; Sept 700 lbs 209.75; Oct 700 lbs 209.66. Week ending 07-04-2014. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Aug 750 lbs 213.87. Holsteins: Large 3 Nov 300 lbs 256.45; Dec 300 lbs 256.45. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700 lbs 205.75; Aug 700 lbs 205.90; Oct 725 lbs 204.50. Basis Trades 325 hd steers. Steers: Delivered Price 800 lbs 5.00 under Oct CME.

Kansas 13,500. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 7 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 850 lbs 208.00; 900 lbs 187.00; Nov 750 lbs 203.50; Delivered Current 800 lbs 214.50; 850 lbs 206.75. Medium and Large 1-2 Delivered Current 785 lbs 215.00; 800 lbs 210.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 650 lbs 213.00; Sept 700 lbs 207.12. Week ending 07-04-2014. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 775 lbs 206.60; 825 lbs 200.00; 850-875 lbs 194.28; 900 lbs 204.00; Delivered Current 850 lbs 206.25. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Jul-Aug 875 lbs 206.00; 900 lbs 204.00; Aug 825 lbs 209.00; Delivered Current 730 lbs 218.50. Medium and Large 2 Delivered Current 690 lbs 213.00; 715 lbs 214.00; 760 lbs 207.00; 950 lbs 190.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB 775 lbs 205.00; Aug 650 lbs 206.25; Sept 650 lbs 207.75.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — July 11
National feeder cattle receipts: 190,700

Feeder and stocker cattle prices ended the holiday interrupted trading session from steady to $5 higher, mostly $8-10 higher on those 800-900 lbs. However, there was significant volatility throughout the two week stint with many yearling specials posting new lofty all-time record highs but sharply lower CME futures pressuring the cash market late this last week. August contracts have lost over $7 since the 4th of July with the only bright spot being the fact that Friday’s session rebounded to near unchanged after trading near limit losses for most of the day. There’s no doubt that recent pressure on the Board is more than just minor profit taking and many analysts are blaming the drop on technical negativity. Somebody must have forgotten to tell the charts just how short cattle numbers are or that we are facing one of the best corn crops in recent memory and the largest in history. Spot corn price from the CBOT is now below $4/bu and the cash corn price in Omaha is $3.65/bu. Cash feeder markets remain very strong (especially on heavy yearlings) with renewed interest from farmer-feeders who travel Corn Belt blacktops that seem more like trails through the Redwood Forest. Many of these independent feeders hope to reach profit through the added value of all-natural beef products with Bassett, NE selling two loads of 800 lb drug free yearling steers at $240. Superior Video’s Week in the Rockies featured 260 head of all-natural Buffalo, SD steers to weigh 1050 lb in October at $205.50. The key to the all-natural premium on feeders is for the heavier yearlings, as drug free calves are no big deal and rarely yield an advantage despite the extra paperwork. Making it through the weaning period without the help of antibiotics is the hard part and most producers don’t segregate treated calves from the rest of the herd. Lightweight calves received top billing in the Southern Plains with light 3-weight steer calves at the Winter Livestock Auction in Dodge City, KS averaging 323 lbs at $357.40. Many of us suspected that we were nearing the top of this feeder cattle market, but it’s still unclear whether this was a peak or a plateau that we’ve been climbing. Fed cattle drifted lower this past week, after setting a new record prior to the holiday, just short of $160. Fats sold $2-3 lower on a live basis from $155-156 and $1-4 lower in the beef from $246-249. This week’s reported auction volume included 50 percent over 600 lbs and 40 percent heifers.

Texas 4200. 63 pct over 600 lbs. 47 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (486) 250.09; 500-550 lbs (518) 256.97; 600-650 lbs (626) 225.62; part load 665 lbs 220.50; 700-750 lbs (729) 213.94. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (421) 253.27; 500-550 lbs (525) 240.36; 600-650 lbs (629) 219.61; 700-750 lbs (731) 196.43; 750-800 lbs (771) 200.40; 900-950 lbs (914) 177.29. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (463) 238.78; 500-550 lbs (524) 225.72; 550-600 lbs (563) 216.12; 700-750 lbs (718) 194.88. Medium and Large 12 400-450 lbs (419) 237.10; 450-500 lbs (485) 231.08; 500-550 lbs (520) 209.79; 550-600 lbs (568) 212.75; 600-650 lbs (611) 204.76; 650-700 lbs (677) 196.59; 700-750 lbs (716) 187.64; 750-800 lbs (772) 190.63.

Oklahoma 26,700. 69 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 318.96; 350-400 lbs (378) 303.43; 400-450 lbs (422) 287.20; 450-500 lbs (470) 268.52; 500-550 lbs (521) 253.62; 550-600 lbs (571) 251.16; 600-650 lbs (617) 239.08; 650-700 lbs (668) 229.59; 700-750 lbs (716) 222.88; 750-800 lbs (768) 215.82; 800-850 lbs (822) 208.30; 850-900 lbs (867) 205.04; 900-950 lbs (917) 119.90; 950-1000 lbs (965) 191.48; 1000-1050 lbs (1030) 187.05; 1050-1100 lbs (1055) 186.72. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (321) 302.63; 350-400 lbs (373) 286.32; 400-450 lbs (431) 274.69; 450-500 lbs (476) 261.83; 500-550 lbs (528) 239.36; 550-600 lbs (579) 230.32; 600-650 lbs (636) 225.77; 650-700 lbs (670) 217.82; 700-750 lbs (730) 214.46; 750-800 lbs (775) 210.39; 800-850 lbs (821) 198.09; 850-900 lbs (872) 198.31; 900-950 lbs (938) 186.52; 950-1000 lbs (984) 181.00; 1000-1050 lbs (1029) 182.35; 1050-1100 lbs (1069) 177.70. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 276.55; 350-400 lbs (373) 266.03; 400-450 lbs (423) 251.66; 450-500 lbs (477) 241.95; 500-550 lbs (524) 231.92; 550-600 lbs (573) 226.31; 600-650 lbs (618) 220.12; 650-700 lbs (668) 209.70; 700-750 lbs (722) 205.88; 750-800 lbs (774) 200.29; 800-850 lbs (812) 199.47; 850-900 lbs (858) 189.84; 900-950 lbs (908) 182.88; 950-1000 lbs (971) 177.37. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (379) 245.80; 400-450 lbs (436) 236.64; 450-500 lbs (486) 224.17; 500-550 lbs (527) 220.06; 550-600 lbs (582) 214.18; 600-650 lbs (635) 211.72; 650-700 lbs (680) 205.69; 700-750 lbs (726) 194.93; 750-800 lbs (775) 192.62; 800-850 lbs (837) 184.67; 850-900 lbs (859) 184.77.

New Mexico 2700. 39 pct over 600 lbs. 30 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (316) 314.81; 350-400 lbs (373) 306.07; 400-450 lbs (414) 268.28; 450-500 lbs (467) 258.75; 500-550 lbs (528) 246.24; 550-600 lbs (571) 230.45; 600-650 lbs (624) 226.93; 650-700 lbs (675) 212.17; 700-750 lbs (724) 205.02. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (532) 228.63; 550-600 lbs (575) 214.00; 600-650 lbs (627) 223.13; 700-750 lbs (734) 211.18; 750-800 lbs (779) 207.46. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 500-550 lbs (522) 212.52; 600-650 lbs (622) 194.76; 650-700 lbs (674) 195.95. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (363) 247.54; 450-500 lbs (474) 230.31.

Kansas 5400. 89 pct over 600 lbs. 50 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 357.40; 500-550 lbs (529) 267.71; 550-600 lbs (582) 266.07; 650-700 lbs (660) 238.74; 700-750 lbs (725) 223.06; 750-800 lbs (790) 211.77; 800-850 lbs (832) 210.69; 850-900 lbs (880) 207.23; 900-950 lbs (934) 198.99; 950-1000 lbs (961) 197.89; 1000-1050 lbs (1018) 194.49. Medium and Large 1-2 600-650 lbs (629) 227.56; 650-700 lbs (683) 218.53; 750-800 lbs (779) 208.97; 800-850 lbs (843) 207.61; 850-900 lbs (857) 196.69; 950-1000 lbs (974) 190.16. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 310 lbs 291.00; 500-550 lbs (517) 250.74; 550-600 lbs (568) 236.42; 700-750 lbs (725) 206.89; 750-800 lbs (770) 206.43; 800-850 lbs (817) 199.75; half load 865 lbs 196.00; half load 925 lbs 195.75. Medium and Large 1-2 pkg 360 lbs 277.50; 600-650 lbs (616) 220.57; 650-700 lbs (683) 209.39; 700-750 lbs (726) 200.68; 750-800 lbs (764) 198.06; 800-850 lbs (832) 188.89; 850-900 lbs (866) 192.71.

Missouri 41,100. 54 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 315.14; 350-400 lbs (373) 294.83; 400-450 lbs (424) 285.49; 450-500 lbs (475) 275.99; 500-550 lbs (524) 265.78; 550-600 lbs (574) 257.24; 600-650 lbs (619) 251.27; 650-700 lbs (670) 236.68; 700-750 lbs (722) 228.53; 750-800 lbs (778) 219.59; 800-850 lbs (832) 216.20; 850-900 lbs (877) 210.26; 900-950 lbs (908) 205.77; 950-1000 lbs (955) 195.70. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (331) 297.22; 350-400 lbs (382) 272.37; 400-450 lbs (425) 267.98; 450-500 lbs (473) 256.98; 500-550 lbs (524) 250.07; 550-600 lbs (571) 243.40; 600-650 lbs (626) 235.53; 650-700 lbs (675) 224.41; 700-750 lbs (725) 218.30; 750-800 lbs (776) 214.62; 800-850 lbs (829) 207.80; 850-900 lbs (871) 211.47; 900-950 lbs (937) 201.63; 950-1000 lbs (951) 206.30; few loads 1065 lbs 191.75. Holsteins: Large 3 350-400 lbs (375) 195.04; 400-450 lbs (418) 203.53; 450-500 lbs (464) 193.53; 500-550 lbs (517) 187.55; 600-650 lbs (635) 176.10; 650-700 lbs (683) 179.59; 700-750 lbs (717) 177.08; 750-800 lbs (789) 173.84; 800-850 lbs (817) 168.32; pkg 910 lbs 161.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 274.16; 350-400 lbs (376) 264.76; 400-450 lbs (428) 253.41; 450-500 lbs (475) 243.16; 500-550 lbs (522) 236.77; 550-600 lbs (575) 228.79; 600-650 lbs (620) 223.87; 650-700 lbs (677) 215.27; 700-750 lbs (717) 213.79; 750-800 lbs (765) 207.21; 800-850 lbs (823) 192.06; 850-900 lbs (882) 184.92; load 935 lbs 179.50. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (329) 260.80; 350-400 lbs (376) 246.36; 400-450 lbs (428) 236.30; 450-500 lbs (480) 227.79; 500-550 lbs (524) 226.09; 550-600 lbs (573) 224.05; 600-650 lbs (624) 220.75; 650-700 lbs (674) 218.51; 700-750 lbs (721) 209.05; 750-800 lbs (777) 190.74; 800-850 lbs (828) 193.08; 850-900 lbs (885) 192.85.

Arkansas 9500. 29 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 325.74; 350-400 lbs (373) 287.03; 400-450 lbs (423) 267.13; 450-500 lbs (471) 256.34; 500-550 lbs (523) 237.97; 550-600 lbs (574) 228.60; 600-650 lbs (619) 222.19; 650-700 lbs (670) 218.21. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 257.07; 350-400 lbs (376) 252.64; 400-450 lbs (424) 242.47; 450-500 lbs (473) 232.35; 500-550 lbs (524) 218.59; 550-600 lbs (568) 213.21; 600-650 lbs (622) 205.10; 650-700 lbs (671) 198.43. Week ending 07-04-2014. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 312.97; 350-400 lbs (379) 289.56; 400-450 lbs (425) 263.85; 450-500 lbs (472) 251.54; 500-550 lbs (519) 241.29; 550-600 lbs (574) 229.16; 600-650 lbs (626) 219.36. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 252.06; 350-400 lbs (373) 235.59; 400-450 lbs (423) 227.65; 450-500 lbs (469) 220.27; 500-550 lbs (520) 212.69; 600-650 lbs (626) 198.52; 650-700 lbs (676) 194.38.

 

 

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Friday, July 18, 2014 11:09 AM