State Climatologist: Summer Could Be Hot And Dry

College Station – Above-average temperatures and dry conditions across Texas could be a sign of things to come this summer, said the state climatologist.
Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, College Station, said he is concerned arid conditions could be prevalent through the summer following the warmest winter on record and a relatively dry spring with above-average temperatures.
March temperatures averaged 6 degrees higher than normal, he said. Cool spells in the first half of May have reduced average temperatures for the spring months, but the season was still 2-3 degrees warmer than usual.
Recent weather patterns around most of the state have also delivered very little moisture, Nielsen-Gammon said. The combination of dry, windy conditions and warmer temperatures could be the precursor to a long, hot summer.
“If dry conditions continue and soil moisture isn’t replenished, we could get into drought relatively quickly,” he said.
Nielsen-Gammon said summertime forecasts are difficult to predict as the jet stream moves further north. But dry springs typically lead to above-average summer temperatures. Water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico are also above normal, which could contribute to summertime warmth and humidity.
East Texas received reasonably wet weather this spring, but much of Central and West Texas are drying out rapidly.
“There is rain in the statewide forecast, but not enough to bring things up to normal,” he said.
Good precipitation could be in store for the Panhandle and North Texas over the next two weeks, Nielsen-Gammon said, but time will tell whether those rain events materialize.
The long-term forecast calls for El Nino conditions to arrive this winter, which could bring wetter-than-normal patterns, but it would be too late for dryland farmers, Nielsen-Gammon said. The lack of spring and summer rains and higher temperatures could also mean surface water, including ponds, would dry out faster.
“So far it’s been a dry May,” he said. “That could be a bit of a problem going into the summer months.”

Ag Groups Stress Need To Keep Current Market Access In NAFTA Talks

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – Commodity groups largely stressed a “do no harm” approach after learning the White House had started the official clock for renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement.
The White House notified the House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee that the Trump administration intends to renegotiate the trade deal. The notification starts a 90-day clock for the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office to work with Congress to detail the specific objectives of the trade talks. In mid-July, the White House will release that summary of specifics for a new NAFTA. It is possible negotiations between the three countries could start as early as Aug. 16.
A bipartisan group of 18 U.S. senators sent a letter to newly confirmed U.S. Trade Ambassador Robert Lighthizer trying to encourage the administration to do no harm to current areas and industries where trade and the economic impacts are positive.
While Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue has announced the creation of a new USDA undersecretary for trade, no name has been submitted for future confirmation. It is unclear if the Trump administration will move to confirm a new trade undersecretary for agriculture before official trade talks begin.
Last month, Perdue was able to talk President Donald Trump out of his plans to simply withdraw from NAFTA, which has been the dominant U.S. trade pact since 1994.
Backing the Trump administration’s gusto on the trade talks, the National Farmers Union sees a chance to rewrite the trade agenda for the U.S. that has led to a $803 billion overall trade deficit last year alone.
In 2016, the U.S. had a $63 billion trade deficit with Mexico and an $11 billion trade deficit with Canada, according to the U.S. Commerce Department.
Roger Johnson, president of NFU, said the deficits lead to lost jobs and lower wages in rural America. “With this renegotiation of NAFTA, the Trump Administration has the opportunity to reset that agenda by instituting a new, fair trade framework that works for family farmers, ranchers, and rural residents. NFU urges them to do so in a fashion that does not upset the positive trade relations the U.S. agriculture community relies upon,” Johnson said.
NFU added that U.S. trade agreements have mainly “advanced the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of family farmers, ranchers, and rural workers.” The renegotiation is a chance to reset that paradigm, the group said. “NAFTA installed, and has since cemented, a set of trade parameters that have benefitted corporate America and damaged rural American communities and economies,” Johnson said.
Dairy groups also support renegotiation. The National Milk Producers Federation, Dairy Export Council and Dairy Foods Association stressed the importance of renegotiating NAFTA to deal with problems the industry is facing with slowing exports to Canada because of a change in Canadian milk-pricing policies. The groups noted U.S. dairy products can face 200%-300% tariffs and policies that distort dairy. “Central to any successful NAFTA negotiations will be changes to Canada’s new policies designed to harm bilateral trade and dump their structural dairy surplus on the world market,” said Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of the milk federation.
The American Farm Bureau Federation will “remain committed to the goal of a positive, market-expanding and modernized NAFTA,” said Zippy Duvall, president of AFBF. Duvall also noted the 2015 Trade Priorities and Accountability Act ensures farmers and other stakeholders get to provide their input with U.S. negotiators on objectives of a new trade deal.
“Our ability to be part of these negotiations is important to our members and will help ensure the outcome improves trade relationships with our neighboring countries,” Duvall said. “Mexico and Canada are two of our largest export markets for the commodities and products raised on U.S. farms and ranches. America’s farmers and ranchers value them as customers and trade partners. We will work to ensure the renegotiation strengthens that critical relationship.”
The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and other industry groups in Canada and Mexico wrote a joint letter to the leaders of all three countries. The letter urged all three not to jeopardize the beef trade by reinstating policies such as country-of-origin labeling for consumers.
“Recent statements about the possible dissolution of NAFTA or potential renegotiation of NAFTA are deeply concerning to us because of the unnecessary risk it places on our producers,” the letter states. “While there may be general agreement among the countries to improve some parts of the NAFTA trade framework, we urge you to recognize that the terms of the agreement affecting cattle producers are strongly supported as they currently exist and should not be altered.”
U.S. pork exports to Canada were valued at $799 million last year, and shipments to Mexico reached $1.4 billion. The National Pork Producers Council called on the administration to protect the tariff-free access that U.S. pork has in both countries.
“Canada and Mexico are top pork export markets. We absolutely must not have any disruptions in exports to our No. 2 (Mexico) and No. 4 (Canada) markets,” said NPPC President Ken Maschhoff, a pork producer from Carlyle, Illinois.
The U.S. Wheat Associates and National Association of Wheat Growers wrote that the groups are looking for opportunities to boost trade, but the main priority is to do no harm. Wheat exports to Mexico are up 40% this marketing year, making Mexico the largest buyer of U.S. wheat, the groups noted.
“I cannot emphasize enough how important our Mexican customers are to U.S. wheat farmers,” said Jason Scott, a wheat farmer from Easton, Maryland, and chairman of the U.S. Wheat Associates. “There is nothing wrong with modernizing a 23-year-old agreement, but that must be done in a way that benefits the food and agriculture sectors in both countries.”
National Corn Growers Association President Wesley Spurlock, a Texas farmer, urged Lighthizer to remember the interests of U.S. agriculture as they begin modernizing the agreement. He stated that U.S. ag exports to Canada and Mexico have tripled and quadrupled, respectively.
“Exports are one pillar of a strong farm economy, accounting for 31% of farmer income,” Spurlock said. “We export billions of dollars of corn and corn products to these countries each year.”
Chip Councell, chairman of the U.S. Grains Council (USGC) and a Maryland farmer, said NAFTA “is the most critical free trade agreement on the books” for most major commodities, meat and distilled grains. He noted corn products go into Canada and Mexico duty-free, leading to $2.7 billion in sales alone in 2016. The grains council’s main priority is to maintain the market access now in place.
“That demand is an essential part of ensuring farmers can continue to farm in this economy,” Councell said.
Brian King, chairman of USA Rice, just returned from a trade mission to Mexico. The rice group wants to demonstrate to Congress and the Trump administration the importance of NAFTA to rice and the risks of a poorly negotiated deal.
“NAFTA made Mexico our number-one export market and solidified our dominant position in Canada. Our message is simple – modernize NAFTA if necessary, but do no harm to the rice industry,” King said.

Texas Youth Received More Than $1.5 Million In Scholarships From The Houston Livestock Show And Rodeo™

College dreams became reality for 79 Houston-area high school graduates during the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Area Go Texan Scholarship Banquet, Wednesday, May 17. Thirty percent of graduates will be the first in their family to attend college.
“The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo is proud to support the youth of Texas through scholarships to help high school graduates achieve a postsecondary education,” said Joel Cowley, president and CEO. “We are confident that these students will represent us well at colleges and universities across the state, and we wish them the best of luck in their future endeavors.”
Show officials and volunteers hosted 79 scholarship recipients from 68 Area Go Texan counties. Each recipient was awarded a four-year, $20,000 scholarship from the Show for a total commitment of $1,580,000. A deserving high school senior from each county was presented a scholarship, and an additional 11 scholarships were awarded at large to eligible students within each Area Go Texan district.
Scholarships are awarded to students who meet the program requirements and demonstrate academic potential, leadership and financial need. All scholarship recipients must attend a Texas college or university.
The Area Go Texan scholarships represent a portion of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo’s annual commitment of more than $26 million to scholarships, research, endowments, calf scramble participants, junior show exhibitors, School Art participants and other educational programs. For more information on the Show’s educational support, visit rodeohouston.com/Educational-Support/Commitment.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 25,400

Texas 11,500. 85 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 550 lbs 154.25; 600 lbs 161.40; 725 lbs 161.40; 725 lbs 146.25; 750-800 lbs 142.31; 800-830 lbs 141.12; 850-885 lbs 134.52; June 700 lbs 152.75; 775 lbs 145.85; July 750 lbs 149.17; Aug 650 lbs 153.85; 750-775 lbs 147.67; Sept 650 lbs 152.00; Del. June 800 lbs 144.50; July 750 lbs 154.07; 800 lbs 146.88; Aug 750 lbs 154.07; Sept 750 lbs 146.75; 800 lbs 145.25; Oct 750 lbs 147.60; 800 lbs 141.80; 850 lbs 142.25. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 610 lbs 153.00; 700 lbs 144.63; 750-785 lbs 140.29; 800-810 lbs 135.28; Del Mex Current 475 lbs 181.50; 530 lbs 172.10; 550-575 lbs 168.71; Del Current 850 lbs 136.00; FOB June 800 lbs 145.00; June-July 725 lbs 147.30; Del July-Aug 800 lbs 149.00; Aug 750 lbs 152.65; Sept 750 lbs 152.65. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 575 lbs 145.50; 700-725 lbs 136.23; 800 lbs 130.00; Del Current 750 lbs 135.00; FOB June 725 lbs 136.00; July 700 lbs 139.25; 750 lbs 136.00; Aug 675 lbs 143.00; 700-725 lbs 136.64; Sept 650 lbs 143.00; Del June 725 lbs 143.95; July 725 lbs 142.24; Aug 650 lbs 145.85; 700-725 lbs 140.91; Sept 700-725 lbs 142.08; Oct 700 lbs 140.25; Nov 700-725 lbs 139.96. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 790 lbs 125.50; Del Current Mex Origin 485 lbs 161.60.
Oklahoma 1800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 68 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 775 lbs 143.98; June 800 lbs 140.94. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 790 lbs 139.76; 800 lbs 139.52. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Aug 700 lbs 146.05; Sept 700 lbs 146.60.
New Mexico 3100. 19 over 600 lbs. 8 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 790 lbs 143.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current Mex 475 lbs 177.50; 525 lbs 168.10; 550-575 lbs 164.52; FOB Current 800 lbs 147.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 760 lbs 134.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current Mex 480 lbs 157.60.
Kansas 4800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 33 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 800-825 lbs 141.83; 850-875 lbs 139.35; July 750 lbs 150.00; Aug 750 lbs 149.00; Del Current 975 lbs 132.90. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 615 lbs 158.50; 675 lbs 156.00; 750-770 lbs 145.27. Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 715 lbs 143.00; 775 lbs 136.00; June 725 lbs 143.00; July 725 lbs 141.50; Aug 725 lbs 140.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — May 19
National feeder cattle receipts: 182,100

Steer and heifer calves traded unevenly from mostly $5 lower to $6 higher. There were instances where calves sold $10 lower early in the week. Sales of feeder steers and heifers early in the week traded steady to $5 lower, with the tide turning at the later part of the week as sales sold $2-4 higher. Trade active on moderate to good demand. Early week auctions saw declines as the markets were trying to catch up with losses from the CME late last week. The cattle futures were down sharply on May 15 lending no support to the market. All confidence was lost forcing buyers to purchase feeders at lower prices with calves taking the hardest hit. However, the futures saw a comeback on May 18-19 triggering major gains on the board. Northern buyers, especially in Nebraska, continue to drive the market and tip their hand as to how far they will go when local cattle come up for sale. In Valentine, NE on May 17 141 head of steers averaging 621 lbs sold for $205.50 and 180 head of yearling steers averaging 879 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $147.53. With the board posting gains, cattle traders put money back on the table. In Unionville, MO a load of steers weighing 714 lbs sold for $171.50, $10 higher than the average price for 7 weight steers sold in other parts of the state. Slaughter weights saw a huge drop in the report released this week with an average dressed carcass weight of 832 lbs. Perhaps feedlot operators might still have the upper hand despite lower fed cash trade this week as packers still need inventory. Boxed-beef has a Choice and Select spread over $25 due to a significant amount of green cattle slaughtered. On May 19, choice boxed-beef closed $.55 cents lower at $247.14 with Select $4.09 lower at $221.42 when compared to the prior week’s close. In the fed cattle exchange, May 17 morning, slaughter cattle sold lower than the previous online sale with a weighted average price of $135.16 with a 1-9 day delivery, and $134.28 at a 1-17 day delivery. This set the tone for May 18 cash cattle trade which also resulted in lower money. Compared to last week, in the Texas Panhandle live sales brought $4 lower at $134. Kansas live sales sold $4-5 lower from $133-134 and Nebraska live sales were reported from $133.00-135.50, with live sales at $135 in Colorado. The Western Corn-belt had a few live sales sold at $134 and dressed at $212. Warm temperatures swept across most of the trade area turning cooler late through the week as severe storms moved in dumping heavy rain and hail in some areas. Planting continues to advance across the U.S. with 71 percent of the corn crop on the ground and soybeans at 32 percent complete which is on pace with the five year average.
Texas 6900. 76 pct over 600 lbs. 47 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (464) 165.38; 500-550 lbs (530) 157.69; 550-600 lbs (573) 157.65; 600-650 lbs (604) 156.52; 650-700 lbs (675) 151.44; 700-750 lbs (728) 146.01; 750-800 lbs (784) 140.71; 800-850 lbs (826) 139.16; 850-900 lbs (872) 135.38; 900-950 lbs (913) 132.35; 950-1000 lbs (969) 127.87; 1000-1050 lbs (1018) 123.51. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (436) 168.00; 500-550 lbs (538) 165.44; 550-600 lbs (571) 153.45; 650-700 lbs (679) 152.67; 700-750 lbs (734) 141.51; 750-800 lbs (794) 138.31; 800-850 lbs (811) 136.33; 900-950 lbs (928) 125.38. Heifers Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (442) 151.95; 450-500 lbs (481) 145.21; 500-550 lbs (527) 141.22; 550-600 lbs (5779) 140.51; 600-650 lbs (631) 142.92; 650-700 lbs (677) 138.32; 700-750 lbs (724) 135.55; 750-800 lbs (764) 136.07; 800-850 lbs (822) 128.56; 850-900 lbs (857) 125.61; 900-950 lbs (939) 115.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (444) 144.61; 450-500 lbs (476) 140.64; 500-550 lbs (513) 136.80; 550-600 lbs (575) 131.81; 600-650 lbs (610) 128.99; 700-750 lbs (734) 128.67; 750-800 lbs (778) 128.22; 850-900 lbs (873) 119.67.
Oklahoma 40,700. 78 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (316) 205.78; 350-400 lbs (371) 193.12; 400-450 lbs (424) 178.48; Thin 400-450 lbs (419) 199.61; 450-500 lbs (476) 174.27; 500-550 lbs (520) 164.72; 550-600 lbs (579) 162.41; 600-650 lbs (616) 161.96; 650-700 lbs (672) 152.27; 700-750 lbs (718) 151.22; 750-800 lbs (771) 145.20; Load thin 773 lbs 155.00; 800-850 lbs (829) 142.53; 850-900 lbs (872) 139.07; Load thin 893 lbs 144.50; 900-950 lbs (926) 134.69; Several loads fancy 937 lbs 144.00; 950-1000 lbs (972) 132.69; Load thin 966 lbs 142.50; 1000-1050 lbs (1025) 132.74. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (431) 177.31; 450-500 lbs (477) 169.18; 500-550 lbs (529) 163.37; 550-600 lbs (578) 156.46; Thin 550-600 lbs (592) 166.27; 600-650 lbs (626) 150.52; 650-700 lbs (684) 147.13; 700-750 lbs (727) 146.14; 750-800 lbs (778) 143.24; 800-850 lbs (828) 138.96; 850-900 lbs (885) 135.44; 900-950 lbs (939) 133.34; 950-1000 lbs (969) 133.21; Few loads 1071 lbs 124.00. Holsteins: Large 3 Load 675 lbs 87.00; 800-850 lbs (820) 86.49; 850-900 lbs (865) 92.99; 900-950 lbs (915) 89.75. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 171.69; 350-400 lbs (375) 165.57; 400-450 lbs (422) 162.95; 450-500 lbs (483) 156.42; 500-550 lbs (526) 148.69; 550-600 lbs (572) 145.48; 600-650 lbs (623) 145.40; 650-700 lbs (670) 139.70; 700-750 lbs (724) 137.09; 750-800 lbs (777) 133.35; 800-850 lbs (817) 129.89; Part load thin 847 lbs 138.75; 850-900 lbs (873) 127.63; Load fancy 853 lbs 132.50; 900-950 lbs (918) 125.45; 950-1000 lbs (977) 122.43. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 164.06; 350-400 lbs (375) 164.44; 400-450 lbs (431) 156.66; 450-500 lbs (473) 153.33; 500-550 lbs (529) 144.80; 550-600 lbs (578) 144.16; 600-650 lbs (629) 138.71; 650-700 lbs (678) 134.21; 700-750 lbs (729) 131.33; 750-800 lbs (771) 126.74; 800-850 lbs (813) 123.50; 850-900 lbs (872) 127.05.
New Mexico 3800. 64 pct over 600 lbs. 47 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (483) 175.87; 500-550 lbs (525) 166.41; 600-650 lbs (613) 154.71; 650-700 lbs (686) 145.54; 700-750 lbs (718) 144.57; 750-800 lbs (772) 139.11; 800-850 lbs (805) 136.53; 850-900 lbs (870) 131.22; 900-950 lbs (930) 127.11. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (524) 167.66; 600-650 lbs (623) 153.96; 650-700 lbs (664) 146.98; 850-900 lbs (867) 128.32; 950-1000 lbs (974) 119.85. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (427) 164.74; 600-650 lbs (632) 139.53; 650-700 lbs (677) 132.05; 800-850 lbs (811) 123.16; 850-900 lbs (867) 121.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (426) 157.38; 450-500 lbs (473) 148.97; 500-550 lbs (520) 157.90; 550-600 lbs (572) 147.14; 650-700 lbs (683) 134.88; 700-750 lbs (734) 128.80.
Kansas 7800. 83 pct over 600 lbs. 76 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (418) 194.00; 450-500 lbs (458) 188.00; 500-550 lbs (532) 174.45; 550-600 lbs (569) 168.66; 600-650 lbs (611) 171.08; 650-700 lbs (671) 162.12; 700-750 lbs (707) 151.86; 750-800 lbs (780) 146.90; 800-850 lbs (870) 142.61; 900-950 lbs (926) 139.81; 950-1000 lbs (963) 138.71; 1000-1050 lbs (1044) 132.00. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (388) 180.24; 450-500 lbs (480) 175.17; 500-550 lbs (510) 169.59; 600-650 lbs (621) 151.51; 650-700 lbs (665) 152.62; 750-800 lbs (772) 139.54; 800-850 lbs (827) 137.49; 850-900 lbs (873) 135.79; 900-950 lbs (928) 133.54; 950-1000 lbs (962) 133.11. Heifers Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 177.00; 450-500 lbs (468) 164.35; 500-550 lbs (537) 155.65; 550-600 lbs (588) 152.54; 600-650 lbs (624) 154.90; 650-700 lbs (678) 143.65; 700-750 lbs (721) 141.76; 750-800 lbs (777) 137.92; 800-850 lbs (822) 136.02; 850-900 lbs (878) 136.30; 900-950 lbs (934) 132.65; 950-1000 lbs (992) 128.85. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (366) 165.40; 400-450 lbs (426) 156.54; 500-550 lbs (535) 151.58; 550-600 lbs (584) 150.62; 650-700 lbs (678) 144.36; 700-750 lbs (747) 136.68; 750-800 lbs (770) 136.54; 800-850 lbs (810) 131.17; 850-900 lbs (890) 127.58.
Missouri 34,600. 35 pct over 600 lbs. 44 pct heifers. Steers: Large 1 450-500 lbs (485) 174.93; 500-550 lbs (523) 168.57; 550-600 lbs (583) 159.41. Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 202.67; 350-400 lbs (374) 197.09; 400-450 lbs (428) 188.41; 450-500 lbs (477) 182.16; 500-550 lbs (523) 178.47; 550-600 lbs (573) 169.59; 600-650 lbs (621) 164.47; 650-700 lbs (675) 160.15; 700-750 lbs (715) 157.67; 750-800 lbs (772) 147.20; 800-850 lbs (808) 143.50; 850-900 lbs (872) 144.99; 900-950 (932) 133.61. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 194.46; 350-400 lbs (379) 182.76; 400-450 lbs (430) 175.74; 450-500 lbs (475) 172.48; 500-550 lbs (525) 168.61; 550-600 (578) 160.65; 600-650 (620) 158.45; 650-700 (674) 149.60; 700-750 (725) 151.20; 750-800 (770) 141.60; 800-850 (827) 140.31; 850-900 (867) 139.71; 900-950 (919) 134.82. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 174.39; 350-400 lbs (379) 168.99; 400-450 lbs (427) 163.59; 450-500 (477) 157.54; 500-550 lbs (526) 152.30; 550-600 lbs (574) 149.71; 600-650 lbs (623) 146.61; 650-700 lbs (675) 138.15; 700-750 lbs (721) 135.76; 800-850 lbs (825) 134.14. Medium and Large 1-2 250-300 lbs (272) 181.22; 300-350 lbs (334) 167.67; 350-400 lbs (375) 162.22; 400-450 lbs (427) 154.23; 450-500 lbs (476) 148.42; 500-550 lbs (527) 146.11; 550-600 lbs (573) 142.92; 600-650 lbs (623) 138.47; 650-700 lbs (672) 137.68; 700-750 lbs (727) 136.82; 750-800 lbs (766) 131.66; 800-850 lbs (832) 128.71; 850-900 lbs (861) 124.13.
Arkansas 8300. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 192.51; 350-400 lbs (376) 180.31; 400-450 lbs (421) 174.25; 450-500 lbs (474) 167.58; 500-550 lbs (523) 161.72; 550-600 lbs (571) 156.10; 600-650 lbs (620) 150.03; 650-700 lbs (673) 144.37. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 163.80; 350-400 lbs (375) 160.40; 400-450 lbs (425) 156.04; 450-500 lbs (475) 149.76; 500-550 lbs (522) 144.40; 550-600 lbs (572) 139.80; 600-650 lbs (627) 135.82; 650-700 lbs (673) 131.78.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, May 25, 2017 3:18 PM