U.S. Has Lost Key Round On COOL Labeling

Ottawa (Dow Jones) – The U.S. has lost a key round at the World Trade Organization in a trade dispute with Canada and Mexico over meat labeling, according to people familiar with the WTO’s findings.
Canada and Mexico opposed a new U.S. rule that requires more information on labels about the origins of beef, pork and other meats, which went into effect in November. They took their case to the WTO, saying the rule hurts their competitiveness. The WTO panel that heard oral arguments in the dispute over the so-called country-of-origin labeling rule earlier this year has decided in favor of Canada and Mexico, according to sources familiar with the panel’s confidential report.
The report, which the three governments have received, is expected to be made public in late September or early October, these sources said.
“We all know what the report says. The U.S. lost,” according to one person with knowledge of the report.
“We do for a fact know that the ruling, when it is made public, will be in favor of Canada and Mexico,” another source said.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued the new rule after a WTO finding in 2012 that an earlier version was discriminatory. But Canada and Mexico said the amended rule was even more onerous, and limited exports of cattle and hogs into the U.S. from their countries. The animals end up being sold at a discount to those from the U.S., they said.
According to WTO rules, the U.S. will have 60 days to appeal from the time the report is made public. Ottawa has to wait until the appeal process is exhausted to get the WTO’s approval to retaliate, which isn’t expected until late next year.
The developments could push the three partners of the North American Free Trade Agreement closer to a potential trade war. Canada, which estimates its cattle and hog industries suffer annual losses of over one billion Canadian dollars ($911.5 million) from the U.S. labeling rule, has threatened to retaliate with punitive tariffs on a range of U.S. imports including chocolate, cornflakes, fruit and potatoes. Canadian officials have said they would wait for WTO approval before taking any action.
U.S. lawmakers who want the labeling rule changed have warned about the economic toll of retaliation. A brief section in the spending bill passed by Congress earlier this year said the U.S. economy could suffer a $2 billion hit if Canada and Mexico made good on their threats to retaliate.
Several government and industry officials in Canada and the U.S. said they have been briefed on the WTO panel’s report, but declined to discuss the findings.
Representatives for Canadian Trade Minister Ed Fast and Canadian Agriculture Minister Berry Ritz said Canada would comply with WTO rules and only comment once the report is made public. But both renewed Canada’s threats of retaliation.
“The [Canadian] government remains steadfast in taking whatever steps may be necessary, including retaliation, to achieve a fair resolution,” Mr. Ritz’s spokesman, Jeffrey English, said in an email.
A spokesman for the U.S. Trade Representative said the report will be circulated to WTO members and will be made public when it is completed and translated, expected later this year.
Big U.S. meatpackers also oppose the meat-labeling rules, saying they drive up costs for the industry.
Proponents of the meat-labeling rules say they provide more information for consumers wary of products from countries with less-stringent safety rules.
Toronto-based Canadian international trade lawyer Lawrence Herman said it would be “unfortunate” if the three countries cannot settle the issue and end up in a trade war.
“It would be a bad signal to the rest of the world that the Nafta countries could not resolve an issue among themselves,” Mr. Herman said.

Davison And Sons Cattle Co. Earns Top Honors At OCA’s 30th Anniversary Range Round-Up

Oklahoma City, OK – After the dust settled from two rounds of fierce competition at the Jim Norick Arena in Oklahoma City, Davison and Sons Cattle Company, Arnett, Okla., was named 2014 Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) Range Round-Up Champion team.
The OCA Range Round-Up features twelve teams of ‘real ranch’ cowboys from Oklahoma’s most historic ranches. The Davison and Sons team will represent Oklahoma as they advance to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association World Championship Ranch Rodeo in November.
Davison and Sons have been tough competitors in the OCA Range Round-Up since 2011, and finally winning the championship title at this year’s 30th annual event.
“We participate because we enjoy the comradery. I also love the opportunity to educate and entertain the general public by showcasing some real ranch activities,” said Weston Givens, Davison and Sons team member.
Team members included: Weston Givens, Jeff Wayland, Jeremiah Campbell, Joe Wayland and Garry Brown. These cowboys secured their winning position by placing first in the Wild Cow Milking and second in the Stray Gathering and third in the Team Penning events. Team member Jeremiah Campbell was named Top Hand.
“When you add in the fact that a large portion of the proceeds are given to charity, it makes the event very worthwhile,” Givens continued.
2014 is the 18th year that the selected charity has been the Children’s Miracle Network. In that time, the OCA has donated more than $441,500.00.
“We like to call the event, ‘Cowboys Helping Kids’,” said Tim Drummond, OCA Range Round-Up Chairman. “We are proud of this event and we appreciate the ranches, sponsors, fans, and volunteers who help us with this important mission.”
Oklahoma Ford Dealers have been the presenting sponsor of Range Round-Up since the inception of the event back in 1985. Thirty years later, the OCA credits much of the event’s success to the Oklahoma Ford Dealers. “The event grows and gains interest each year and that is largely because of television and radio advertisement provided from the Oklahoma Ford Dealers,” Drummond said.
At the conclusion of two performances, Range Round-Up event standings were as follows — Saddle Bronc Riding: 1st place – Hitch Ranch. Stray Gathering: 1st place - McCoy Ranch and Beebe Livestock. Wild Cow Milking: 1st place – Davison and Sons Cattle Co. Team Branding: 1st place – Alfalfa Land and Cattle Co. Team Penning: 1st place – Alfalfa Land and Cattle Co. Wild Horse Race: 1st place – 3C Cattle Co.
Justin Peterson, a member of the Buford Ranches team earned the Tough Hand Award.
Junior Donkey Bronc Riding is always a crowd pleaser for the half-time show. The junior cowboys and cowgirls participating are serious competitors. The top three participants were: 1st place – Cooper Brannon, 2nd place (tie) Patrick Prater and Dagan McPhail.

OSU To Host National Beef Reproduction Conference Oct. 8-9

By Donald Stotts

Stillwater, Okla. – Cow-calf producers and large-animal veterinarians should plan now to attend the 2014 Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle Conference hosted by Oklahoma State University’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources October 8-9.
“Think of the conference as one-stop shopping, in that participants of every experience level will be able to gain insights about subjects as diverse as basic cattle reproduction and artificial insemination to the latest advances related to embryo transfer and fertility technology,” said Megan Rolf, OSU Cooperative Extension beef cattle specialist.
A schedule of events is available online at http://www.beefextension.com/genetics. The two-day conference will take place in the OSU Student Union, located on the university’s Stillwater campus.
The conference is an annual Beef Reproduction Task Force event that alternates from state to state. The task force is a multi-state extension activity in cooperation with the North Central Agricultural and Natural Resources Program Leaders Committee and the Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service.
“Educating cow-calf producers and those who serve them is a primary goal of the task force,” said Dan Stein, OSU Cooperative Extension livestock production specialist. “Reproductive efficiency is a major driver of profitability and sustainability, both for a producer’s individual operation and the industry as a whole.”
Key goals of the Beef Reproduction Task Force include promoting widespread adoption of reproductive technologies among cow-calf producers, educating producers in management considerations that will increase the likelihood of successful breeding of animals through artificial insemination and educating producers about marketing options to capture benefits that result from use of improved reproductive techniques.
“Cow-calf producers and large-animal veterinarians should go ahead and put the conference on their schedules,” Stein said. “It will be the place to be in October. For most producers, profit margins are tight, so it is imperative they are aware of and make the best use of available technologies and animal management practices.”
Anyone seeking additional information about the October 8-9 conference should contact Rolf by email at mrolf@okstate.edu or Stein by email at daniel.stein@okstate.edu.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 16,800

Texas 6700. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 745 lbs 212.00; 750-775 lbs 211.05; 800-825 lbs 210.97; 850-875 lbs 207.22; Oct 725 lbs 219.25; 800 lbs 219.75; Nov 775 lbs 211.25; Del Nov 750 lbs 209.90. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 685 lbs 215.00; 750 lbs 206.71; 800-810 lbs 204.45; Sept 750 lbs 207.70; Del Current 665 lbs 247.00; 770-775 lbs 220.14; 800-830 lbs 213.09; Sept 655-685 lbs 241.27; 770-790 lbs 224.56; 800 lbs 224.40; Nov 750 lbs 212.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 650 lbs 209.00; 700-725 lbs 204.15; 750 lbs 199.50; Oct 650 lbs 209.90; 700 lbs 204.30; Nov 600-625 lbs 212.40; 650 lbs 208.08; 700 lbs 205.20; Del Sept 560 lbs 246.15; Oct 700 lbs 206.68; Nov 675 lbs 207.65; 700 lbs 207.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 195.47; Del Current 635 lbs 236.00; Sept 570 lbs 246.00; 635-640 lbs 235.37; 670 lbs 233.00.

Oklahoma 1400. 94 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700 lbs 223.00; 775 lbs 212.00; Del Current 780 lbs 214.00; 850 lbs 207.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 740 lbs 211.78. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 530 lbs 235.00; Oct 700 lbs 203.90; Nov 700 lbs 205.00.

Kansas 2200. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 3 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 825 lbs 216.00; Nov 750 lbs 207.92. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 740 lbs 214.50; 750 lbs 212.00. Medium and Large 2 Del Current 960 lbs 189.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750 lbs 202.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — August 15
National feeder cattle receipts: 146,300

Deeder cattle and calves traded weak to $5 lower with spots $10 lower. Last week’s limit losses on Thursday and Friday in the live and feeder cattle pits spilled over into this week. Monday’s CME session showed signs of decent gains and footing only to be a dead cat bounce as sharp losses on Tuesday and Wednesday set the tone for the week before firming up on Thursday. Feeder cattle numbers remain limited as they have all year and demand remains very good for all offerings of feeder cattle with buyers still holding plenty of orders. Best demand for lightweight calves under 550 lbs is still very active as in Loup City, NE on Tuesday the market was very optimistic selling 500-535 lb steer calves right off the cow for weighted average price of $291.89. Yearling cattle still have very good demand as in Bassett, NE on Wednesday sold near 375 head of 1000-1020 lb steers with a weighted average price of $213.21 and 106 head fancy steers weighing 1000 lbs at $223.75. Many market watchers feel the market has been too top heavy but the market still has a lot of optimism and activity as most markets reported demand very good. This week’s USDA grain report had bearish estimates for corn with estimated yield of 167.4 bpa and 14.032 billion bushels both a little less than expected but setting new highs in yield and production. Fed cattle market is struggling to hold prices near record levels as this week’s trade with live sales mostly $5 lower in Kansas at $155 with sales in Nebraska from $154-155. On Thursday morning a few live sales in western Nebraska traded at $156. Despite showing so much strength only a few weeks ago, there seems to be fears of too high too fast. We have also seen hog futures decline sharply as well after hitting a record high in July. The American consumer has a great variety of competing meats to choose from and is quick to notice when budgets are tight. With lower boxed beef prices this will hopefully spark retail buying going into Labor Day Weekend. This week’s auction volume included 50 percent over 600 lbs and 40 percent heifers.

Texas 3500. 62 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (425) 294.48; 500-550 lbs (511) 241.28; 550-600 lbs (565) 240.01; 600-650 lbs (626) 230.58; 700-750 lbs (718) 211.92; 750-800 lbs (783) 205.07; 800-850 lbs (829) 210.88. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (420) 271.22; 500-550 lbs (524) 231.74; 550-600 lbs (578) 233.81; 600-650 lbs (636) 215.33; 650-700 lbs (667) 213.02; 700-750 lbs (714) 218.00; 750-800 lbs (772) 197.35; 800-850 lbs (823) 199.86. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (418) 250.46; 600-650 lbs (625) 206.20; 700-750 lbs (723) 195.13. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (377) 262.47; 400-450 lbs (431) 223.97; 450-500 lbs (467) 231.36; 500-550 lbs (532) 202.43; 550-600 lbs (578) 208.74; 600-650 lbs (622) 202.95; 650-700 lbs (668) 195.88; 700-750 lbs (725) 199.83; 750-800 lbs (750) 175.50.

Oklahoma 16,000. 70 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (321) 345.83; 350-400 lbs (379) 318.90; 400-450 lbs (421) 301.27; 450-500 lbs (469) 273.26; 500-550 lbs (522) 261.82; 550-600 lbs (573) 247.74; 600-650 lbs (620) 236.38; 650-700 lbs (674) 233.36; 700-750 lbs (721) 221.83; 750-800 lbs (774) 218.11; 800-850 lbs (817) 212.25; 850-900 lbs (864) 209.65; 900-950 lbs (916) 204.87; half load 950 lbs 199.00. Medium and Large 12 450-500 lbs (482) 264.31; 500-550 lbs (529) 251.02; 550-600 lbs (582) 242.46; 600-650 lbs (637) 226.21; 650-700 lbs (681) 226.95; 700-750 lbs (732) 219.87; 750-800 lbs (778) 214.26; 800-850 lbs (832) 207.59; 850-900 lbs (877) 205.73; 900-950 lbs (912) 197.52. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 305.48; 350-400 lbs (375) 279.95; 400-450 lbs (422) 266.48; 450-500 lbs (466) 253.66; 500-550 lbs (518) 241.92; 550-600 lbs (575) 235.76; 600-650 lbs (621) 223.85; 650-700 lbs (675) 215.45; 700-750 lbs (723) 210.40; 750-800 lbs (776) 202.14; 800-850 lbs (816) 200.76; 850-900 lbs (885) 192.88; 900-950 lbs (928) 183.50. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (435) 248.56; 450-500 lbs (477) 240.57; 500-550 lbs (528) 238.40; 550-600 lbs (561) 228.46; 600-650 lbs (633) 211.63; 650-700 lbs (674) 206.54; 700-750 lbs (728) 201.06; 750-800 lbs (769) 198.01.

New Mexico 2200. 46 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (471) 269.59; 500-550 lbs (523) 251.76; 550-600 lbs (564) 239.43; 600-650 lbs (627) 223.89; 650-700 lbs (658) 224.48; 700-750 lbs (735) 214.67; 800-850 lbs (828) 191.65. Medium and Large 1-2 700-750 lbs (703) 207.06. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (426) 258.39; 450-500 lbs (460) 238.22; 500-550 lbs (536) 228.94; 550-600 lbs (574) 225.81; 600-650 lbs (629) 208.39. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (472) 216.87; 600-650 lbs (624) 196.06; 700-750 lbs (709) 193.22.

Kansas 6000. 92 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 500-550 lbs (504) 276.33; 600-650 lbs (617) 252.87; 650-700 lbs (678) 237.92; 700-750 lbs (724) 226.01; 750-800 lbs (774) 218.97; 800-850 lbs (822) 213.75; 850-900 lbs (872) 210.81; 900-950 lbs (928) 204.51; 950-1000 lbs (970) 200.71; load 1010 lbs 195.25. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (438) 293.71; 500-550 lbs (537) 260.14; 550-600 lbs (582) 256.68; 650-700 lbs (695) 229.03; 700-750 lbs (725) 217.94; 750-800 lbs (781) 216.69; 800-850 lbs (822) 203.71; 850-900 lbs (883) 203.96; 900-950 lbs (916) 198.77; 950-1000 lbs (962) 192.01. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 600-650 lbs (635) 223.66; 650-700 lbs (666) 220.84; 700-750 lbs (724) 209.23; 750-800 lbs (772) 201.67; 800-850 lbs (822) 195.62; 850-900 lbs (860) 197.81; load 960 lbs 191.50. Medium and Large 1-2 600-650 lbs (617) 229.11; 650-700 lbs (667) 210.98; 700-750 lbs (722) 205.92; 750-800 lbs (783) 199.76; 800-850 lbs (818) 195.21; 850-900 lbs (859) 189.53.

Missouri 19,300. 52 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (286) 340.50; 300-350 lbs (324) 319.38; 350-400 lbs (371) 312.03; 400-450 lbs (427) 287.34; 450-500 lbs (471) 282.68; 500-550 lbs (524) 261.14; 550-600 lbs (573) 254.33; 600-650 lbs (615) 246.38; 650-700 lbs (667) 240.34; 700-750 lbs (719) 226.22; 750-800 lbs (756) 221.03; 800-850 lbs (821) 221.77; 850-900 lbs (876) 206.34; 900-950 lbs (911) 206.08; 950-1000 lbs (962) 199.66. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (336) 300.23; 350-400 lbs (381) 291.77; 400-450 lbs (428) 272.36; 450-500 lbs (477) 256.78; 500-550 lbs (528) 251.94; 550-600 lbs (577) 245.11; 600-650 lbs (630) 236.54; 650-700 lbs (673) 227.19; 700-750 lbs (724) 218.86; 750-800 lbs (779) 207.30; 850-900 lbs (865) 203.44. Holsteins: Large 3 350-400 lbs (374) 206.83; 400-450 lbs (429) 182.86; 450-500 lbs (459) 196.85; 500-550 lbs (511) 183.95; 550-600 lbs (576) 180.99; 600-650 lbs (618) 177.17; 650-700 lbs (679) 168.29; 700-750 lbs (713) 167.00; 750-800 lbs (774) 170.16; 800-850 lbs (826) 165.75. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 277.19; 350-400 lbs (375) 263.71; 400-450 lbs (426) 255.54; 450-500 lbs (473) 245.33; 500-550 lbs (528) 237.96; 550-600 lbs (581) 232.24; 600-650 lbs (630) 226.67; 650-700 lbs (673) 226.93; 700-750 lbs (734) 217.19; 750-800 lbs (770) 209.58; 800-850 lbs (829) 201.20; 850-900 lbs (879) 201.33. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (327) 259.60; 350-400 lbs (383) 250.72; 400-450 lbs (430) 245.64; 450-500 lbs (474) 234.06; 500-550 lbs (530) 230.85; 550-600 lbs (577) 226.86; 600-650 lbs (621) 221.54; 650-700 lbs (675) 215.34; 700-750 lbs (725) 216.87; 750-800 lbs (772) 211.12; 800-850 lbs (823) 179.38.

Arkansas 7900. 32 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 322.84; 350-400 lbs (374) 302.62; 400-450 lbs (423) 281.93; 450-500 lbs (471) 265.21; 500-550 lbs (520) 245.43; 550-600 lbs (575) 236.30; 600-650 lbs (624) 226.25; 650-700 lbs (672) 218.96. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 279.29; 350-400 lbs (373) 263.85; 400-450 lbs (425) 245.79; 450-500 lbs (474) 237.26; 500-550 lbs (522) 224.14; 550-600 lbs (568) 218.14; 600-650 lbs (624) 210.96; 650-700 lbs (676) 204.80.

 

 

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Friday, August 29, 2014 3:15 PM