Texas Beef Council Announces Launch Of New Campaign “BEEF Loving Texans”

Austin, TX – The Texas Beef Council (TBC) is proud to announce the launch of BEEF Loving Texans - a consumer-driven campaign created to share unique recipes, stories, cooking and shopping tips, and expert nutrition information. The BEEF Loving Texans campaign celebrates the pride and values deeply rooted in Texans through family, community and tradition.
BEEF Loving Texans aims to tell the story of the benefits of beef in a way that’s meaningful to Texans and connecting shared Texan values, nostalgia, and pride to the passion Texans have for beef.
“We’re exploring the special place beef has in the hearts of so many Texas families and communities and how our state’s pride shines through in so many ways,” said Linda Bebee, vice president, domestic marketing for TBC. “Texans love beef, and launching our BEEF Loving Texans campaign is a great way to connect and tell those stories. We encourage everyone throughout Texas to join our efforts and look out for the campaign online, on TV, radio, billboards, and at retail stores and events near you.”
Bringing the campaign to life, TBC will use its new interactive website BEEFLovingTexans.com to showcase families, led by older millennial parents, who strive to meet the every day challenges of getting flavorful, nutritious dinners on the table while teaching their children how to have a positive relationship with the food they eat. Dinners will focus around beef recipes passed down through generations and adapted to each family’s lifestyle, mealtime challenges and unique tastes.
“As a stakeholder in both the national and state beef checkoff programs in Texas, I’m beyond proud and excited about the BEEF Loving Texans brand and advertising launch here in Texas,” said Katsy Cluck, chair of the TBC domestic marketing committee, feedyard owner and rancher from Boerne. “The checkoff programs in Texas have one clear mission in mind: to conduct demand building programs and enhance cattle producers’ profitability. We believe this campaign will do just that.”
Whether celebrating Texas pride through family, community or tradition, the BEEF Loving Texans campaign is designed to capture and showcase the untold stories about beef, and reach consumers with compelling information that ultimately sets the table with delicious, convenient and quality ways of life.

Cattle Handling And Stockmanship Expert Set To Speak At Free Educational Conference

By Leilana McKindra

Stillwater, Okla. – International cattle handling and stockmanship expert Dr. Tom Noffsinger will headline a slate of speakers at the Merck Animal Health and Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension Cattle Conference set for this summer.
Free and open to the public, the conference will be 1-7 p.m., July 16 at the Grady County Fairgrounds and Event Center, 500 East Choctow, in Chickasha. Dinner will be provided in part by the Beef Check Off and the Oklahoma Beef Quality Assurance Program.
“This is the first time we’ve offered this conference,” said Gant Mourer, OSU Cooperative Extension beef enhancement specialist. “This event is for anyone who is interested in increasing the efficiency of their operation while cutting down on the stress on both their cattle and themselves.”
Dr. Noffsinger will discuss low-stress cattle handling and stockmanship as well as offer a live cattle demonstration.
A past president and the 2001 consultant of the year for the Academy of Veterinary Consultants, Dr. Noffsinger specializes in independent feedlot and production animal consultation, facility design and stockmanship.
With additional expertise in bovine respiratory disease management and lameness prevention, he has presented at conferences across the nation as well as in Australia, Spain and Canada.
Other topics covered during the conference will include the Beef Quality Assurance program and optimizing cow-calf and stocker profits.
To RSVP for the conference, call 405-744-6060 or email Mourer at gantm@okstate.edu by July 11.

‘Bold Plans For A Bright Future’ Oklahoma Cattlemen’s 64th Annual Convention & Trade Show Moves Locations

Oklahoma City, Okla. – The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association’s (OCA) 64th Annual Convention and Trade Show is scheduled for July 21-23, 2016. The event will be held at the Embassy Suites in Norman, Okla.
“We are excited to move to a larger facility that will accommodate our growing number of attendees and allow our Trade Show to expand,” said Charlie Swanson, OCA President.
The convention theme is, ‘Bold Plans for a Bright Future’.
“This theme is fitting as we move to a new location for our most anticipated event of the year,” said Swanson. “Additionally, OCA started 2016 with a clear mission, vision and action plan following some strategic planning in the fall of 2015 and those really are bold plans so that cattlemen here in Oklahoma can and will have a bright future.”
Convention registration will be available online at www.okcattlemen.org. A complete agenda and featured speakers can also be found online. Individuals interested in exhibiting in the Trade Show, call Jeff at the OCA office at 405-235-4391.
“I invite you to join me and several hundred other cattlemen from all around the state during OCA Convention. There will be several opportunities to help set OCA policy, learn about current industry issues, attend educational workshops, celebrate outstanding cattlemen and their accomplishments and visit a trade show that is sure to impress,” Swanson said.
The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association is the trusted voice of the Oklahoma beef industry. The OCA officers, board of directors and membership encourages you to join us in our advocacy efforts to ensure less government intervention, lower taxes and a better bottom line. For more information about OCA membership or activities visit www.okcattlemen.org.

OBITUARY


DALE F. RUNNION
1917-2016

Dale F. Runnion, editor and publisher of purebred cattle magazines and noted breed promoter, died on June 11, 2016 in Longmont, Colorado at the age of 98. His death was announced by June Runnion, his wife of 48 years and partner in his publishing and business ventures.
Runnion started his career in livestock journalism in 1949 as field representative for the Chicago Drovers Journal. In 1952 he moved to the Aberdeen Angus Journal where he rose from field man to Advertising Manager to Managing Editor. At the Angus Journal he recruited and trained a dynamic field force and instituted the Sire of the Year Award. In 1962 Angus registrations exceeded those of the Hereford breed, previously the most numerous. His career took a different turn in 1968 when he accepted a position as Marketing Manager with Ankony Angus from Lee Leachman, a close friend since college. Ankony, was based in Rhinebeck, NY and was at that time a dominant force in registered Angus cattle business.
In 1971 Runnion returned to publishing in Ft. Collins, Colorado founding the International Limousin Journal, a magazine devoted to the French breed of cattle. Runnion’s editorial and marketing efforts were instrumental in promoting the growth of the Limousin breed in the U.S. throughout the 1970’s. He sold the Limousin Journal in 1979.
Eighteen months later he was approached by the American Angus Association about a consulting assignment to manage the Angus Journal, which represented the nation’s largest beef cattle breed. Dale worked in St. Joseph, Missouri for the next two years to improve the magazine’s performance.
In the interim, the Limousin Journal had faltered, and in 1983 Dale and Dan Wedman founded the Limousin World, which quickly became the official publication of the breed foundation. He remained publisher emeritus of the magazine until his death.
Dale Franklin Runnion was born on August 23, 1917 on a 160-acre livestock and grain farm in Van Wert County, Ohio. He was the second child of Lester and Velma (Cooper) Runnion. While growing up, he was active in 4-H, showing steers at the county fair and judging livestock. In 1934 he and two Van Wert friends won the state judging competition and represented Ohio at the 4-H Congress at the International Livestock Exposition in Chicago.
He attended the Ohio State University majoring in animal husbandry and meat science and was a member of livestock judging teams for three years. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1939, and worked as a cattle buyer before being drafted into the Army two years later. He was honorably discharged as a major in 1946.
In recognition of his accomplishments, Runnion’s portrait was hung in a collection of the Saddle and Sirloin Club in 1988. That collection is the world’s largest assemblage of quality individual portraits devoted to a single industry and resides at the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center in Louisville. He was President of the Livestock Publications Council. He was also inducted into the halls of fame of the North American Limousin Foundation, the American Angus Association and the Ohio State University Animal Science Department and the Livestock Marketeers.
He married Ada Kline in 1940. They were divorced in 1967, and he married June Erickson in 1968. In addition to June, he is survived by his four children, two stepchildren, five grandchildren and four great grandchildren.
He championed current news in breed publications and introduced innovations to improve publication efficiency, but he was perhaps best known for the people he recruited, trained and inspired. He had the ability to recognize, cultivate and motivate talented individuals. Coming out of the Depression era, he was especially proud of giving young people a job opportunity and helping them toward a productive career.
In his career he managed to combine traditional values learned on the family farm, the most current industry developments and the modern media sciences of advertising and marketing to promote the growth of the registered Angus and Limousin cattle breeds.
Private services was held for the family on June 18th in Longmont, where Dale was a member of LifeBridge Christian Church. Memorial donations may be made to TRU Hospice Care, 2594 Trailridge Drive East, Lafayette, CO 80026 or to Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity, 10101 Ambassador Drive, Kansas City, MO 64153, Attn: Dale F. Runnion Scholarship Fund.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 20,100

Texas 17,200. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current few loads 550 lbs 165.00; several loads 700 lbs 146.26; 750-775 lbs (766) 139.61; load 800 lbs 137.50; Del Current several loads 750 lbs 142.00; FOB Aug 750-775 lbs (765) 140.82; Sept load 675 lbs 151.75; several loads 750 lbs 139.13; several loads 800 lbs 133.90; Del Aug load 600 lbs 157.00; load 750 lbs 146.75; Sept 750-775 lbs (769) 139.47; Oct several loads 775 lbs 139.40. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current few loads 650 lbs 147.89; 715-725 lbs (718) 139.70; few loads 750 lbs 142.10; 800-840 lbs (829) 134.80; 850-875 lbs (863) 135.01; Del Current load 610 lbs 149.25; 660-690 lbs (672) 152.19; 735-740 lbs (738) 145.34; load 705 lbs 133.00 Mex; 750-790 lbs (770) 141.34; 800-815 lbs (803) 140.55; several loads 850 lbs 140.81; FOB Aug load 800 lbs 139.25; Oct several loads 750 lbs 137.45; Del Aug several loads 625 lbs 162.50; load 650 lbs 147.85; load 700 lbs 146.15. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs (713) 130.56; Del Current load 650 lbs 143.75; few loads 700 lbs 136.15; FOB July load 650 lbs 142.75; few loads 700 lbs 133.75; Aug several loads 650 lbs 137.86; load 700 lbs 137.65; Sept load 650 lbs 140.10; 700-725 lbs (706) 132.17; Del July few loads 575 lbs 144.15; Sept several loads 700 lbs 132.47; Oct several loads 700 lbs 133.12. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current few loads 630 lbs 138.05; 665-685 lbs (679) 139.72; load 700 lbs 132.95; few loads 715 lbs 133.70 Mex; few loads 750 lbs 133.70; Del Current few loads 725 lbs 140.00; load 750 lbs 137.00; Sept several loads 650 lbs 140.02.
Oklahoma 900. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 30 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current few loads 660 lbs 153.83; few loads 825 lbs 139.27; few loads 900 lbs 130.86. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current few loads 690 lbs 146.87. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current few loads 775 lbs 138.17. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current load 660 lbs 136.87.
New Mexico 400. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 54 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current load 750 lbs 141.20; few loads 800 lbs 138.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current few loads 700 lbs 135.15.
Kansas Direct 300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 800 lbs 143.00 Current FOB; 825 lbs 143.50 Current Del; 900 lbs 133.00 Current Del.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — June 17
National feeder cattle receipts: 124,000

Feeder steers and heifers sold $5-10 lower. The only thing certain in the beef complex right now is uncertainty, and that was reflected this week in all aspects of the cattle sector. Cattle futures bottomed out early on Monday morning and nearly all contracts closed limit down which just set the stage for the rest of the week. Early fears of a dry summer had subsided after some timely spring rains but those fears came roaring back this week with an extended heat wave and no significant chance of rain in the long range forecast. Lots of hay was put up across the country the past 10 days with quality reportedly above average but drying fast. Crops are also still in good condition but that will change in a hurry with a long string of days with a triple digit heat index and not a rain cloud in sight. Extreme heat and humidity across cattle country slowed movement of feeders to auction barns, but even with much lighter receipts most auctions saw sharply lower trade compared to last week. It’s tough to transition cattle to a new environment in such conditions, especially when the cattle in question are soft bawling calves. Feeder cattle aren’t the only ones who suffer in the heat though, as feedlots continue to pull green cattle forward in an effort to stay current but also to protect the pounds they’ve put on the cattle in their pens. Big cattle just melt in the heat and simply can’t keep the weight on, so feeders would just as soon move them ahead as see those days on feed go to waste. In recent weeks multiple major packers have been known to need cattle but feedlots haven’t been able to capitalize. With less packer competition anticipated this week, it was clear trade would be lower but few would have ventured to guess just how much cheaper it would shake out. Midweek sales were reported at $125, only $3 lower than last week, but by the time widespread trade occurred late June 16, live sales were mostly $120-121 in the south, $8 lower and $119-120 in the north, $9 lower. Even more dramatically, dressed sales in the northern plains were reported at $190-196, a whopping $13-17 lower than just one week ago. Volatility abounds. This collapse is no surprise really and has been anticipated for some time but it’s still a tough pill to swallow. Demand has grown but supplies have too; packer margins are already generous and they clearly remain in the drivers seat. In the daily grind of production a farmer-feeder or cow/calf man feels a long way from the packer but the trickle-down effect hits home quickly when it’s time to market their product. The best way, or currently the only way, for a cattle feeder to create any margin for themselves is to buy their replacements cheaper. As the old adage goes, “you don’t make money when you sell one, you make money when you buy one.”
Texas 900. 75 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 load 800-850 lbs (812) 133.70; couple loads 914 lbs 129.50; load 962 lbs 122.50. Medium and Large 1-2 load 722 lbs 134.53; load 53 lbs 130.37. Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 couple loads 750-800 lbs (757) 127.53.
Oklahoma 30,600. 81 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 199.20; 350-400 lbs (377) 189.97; 400-450 lbs (430) 178.81; 450-500 lbs (470) 166.50; 500-550 lbs (519) 161.70; 550-600 lbs (574) 154.04; 600-650 lbs (626) 148.68; 650-700 lbs (670) 148.27; 700-750 lbs (728) 144.12; 750-800 lbs (776) 141.98; 800-850 lbs (825) 139.15; 850-900 lbs (872) 135.14; 900-950 lbs (919) 132.92; 950-100 lbs (979) 129.43. Medium and Large 12 350-400 lbs (374) 182.20; 400-450 lbs (438) 169.32; 450-500 lbs (480) 162.38; 500-550 lbs (520) 151.90; 550-600 lbs (567) 145.16; 600-650 lbs (626) 145.51; 650-700 lbs (682) 146.32; 700-750 lbs (734) 142.92; 750-800 lbs (779) 137.27; 800-850 lbs (818) 136.64; 850-900 lbs (864) 133.70; 900-950 lbs (938) 129.70; 950-1000 lbs (978) 125.17. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 164.21; 350-400 lbs (383) 155.33; 400-450 lbs (424) 151.51; 450-500 lbs (476) 149.56; 500-550 lbs (527) 146.37; 550-600 lbs (573) 146.43; 600-650 lbs (624) 137.65; 650-700 lbs (679) 138.48; 700-750 lbs (721) 135.45; 750-800 lbs (771) 132.57; 800-850 lbs (814) 128.00; 850-900 lbs (873) 124.65; 900-950 lbs (907) 121.88; 950-1000 lbs (962) 119.09. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (378) 151.15; 400-450 lbs (430) 145.00; 450-500 lbs (489) 142.91; 500-550 lbs (514) 137.50; 550-600 lbs (575) 136.94; 600-650 lbs (632) 134.77; 650-700 lbs (676) 136.56; 700-750 lbs (736) 133.66; 750-800 lbs (777) 129.29; 800-850 lbs (828) 125.77; 850-900 lbs (884) 121.85.
New Mexico 3700. 33 pct over 600 lbs. 47 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (478) 164.13; 500-550 lbs (516) 161.79; 700-750 lbs (708) 143.85; 750-800 lbs (764) 142.59. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (437) 161.79; 500-550 lbs (539) 156.32; 550-600 lbs (571) 152.96; 650-700 lbs (670) 146.11; 700-750 lbs (721) 138.59; 750-800 lbs (778) 136.84. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (418) 159.80; 450-500 lbs (476) 147.57; 500-550 lbs (535) 138.48; 700-750 lbs (721) 136.45; pkg 750 lbs 128.00. Medium and Large 12 450-500 lbs (477) 144.58; 500-550 lbs (522) 138.65; 550-600 lbs (570) 136.20.
Kansas 2400. 94 pct over 600 lbs. 34 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 few 665 lbs 152.35; 750-800 lbs (774) 143.23; load 812 lbs 142.63; 850-900 lbs (871) 142.86; 900-950 lbs (924) 134.19; 950-1000 lbs (957) 134.28; 1000-1050 lbs (1009) 127.58. Medium and Large 1-2 few 750-800 (755) few 142.00; 800-850 (805) 135.84. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 few 747 lbs 134.50; 750-800 lbs 135.20; few 800-850 lbs 129.37; load 852 lbs 125.75.
Missouri 19,000. 48 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (381) 169.46; 400-450 lbs (434) 173.87; 450-500 lbs (474) 166.09; 500-550 lbs (526) 160.84; 550-600 lbs (571) 1547.43; 600-650 lbs (624) 154.33; 650-700 lbs (670) 150.97; 700-750 lbs (722) 147.21; 750-800 lbs (766) 143.58; 800-850 lbs (816) 143.16; 850-900 lbs (885) 139.25; 900-950 lbs (922) 134.47. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (333) 167.83; 350-400 lbs (382) 172.69; 400-450 lbs (427) 166.77; 450-500 lbs (474) 158.55; 500-550 lbs (524) 154.46; 550-600 lbs (574) 149.68; 600-650 lbs (625) 149.33; 650-700 lbs (680) 146.44; 700-750 lbs (727) 147.75; 750-800 lbs (780) 139.90; 800-850 lbs (831) 134.16; 850-900 lbs (874) 132.41; 900-950 lbs (930) 126.76; 950-1000 lbs (976) 121.86. Holsteins: Large 3 load 850 lbs 97.00; 950-1000 lbs (957) 80.17. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (375) 161.47; 400-450 lbs (429) 153.09; 450-500 lbs (475) 154.06; 500-550 lbs (521) 145.56; 550-600 lbs (576) 140.04; 600-650 lbs (618) 142.27; 650-700 lbs (668) 135.58; 700-750 lbs (720) 139.05; 750-800 lbs (766) 133.91. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (332) 150.90; 350-400 lbs (382) 149.55; 400-450 lbs (425) 144.07; 450-500 lbs (478) 139.60; 500-550 lbs (522) 139.24; 550-600 lbs (578) 136.33; 600-650 lbs (619) 133.17; 650-700 lbs (676) 128.67; 700-750 lbs (732) 137.18; 750-800 lbs (770) 127.18; 800-850 lbs (827) 121.75; 850-900 lbs (859) 125.10.
Arkansas 4600. 29 pct over 600 lbs. 34 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 183.61; 350-400 lbs (373) 175.15; 400-450 lbs (419) 163.37; 450-500 lbs (475) 156.09; 500-550 lbs (522) 148.09; 550-600 lbs (571) 146.05; 600-650 lbs (625) 139.77; 650-700 lbs (670) 140.53. Heifers: Medium and Large 1: 300-350 lbs (328) 159.39; 350-400 lbs (375) 151.06; 400-450 lbs (426) 146.63; 450-500 lbs (474) 142.70; 500-550 lbs (520) 136.82; 550-600 lbs (577) 134.81; 600-650 lbs (624) 128.84.

 

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Friday, June 24, 2016 10:57 AM