Ag Confidence Index Results

By Katie Micik
DTN Markets Editor

Omaha (DTN) – Crop farmers in the Midwest are no longer alone in their pessimism about the agriculture economy. Livestock producers and farmers in the south aren’t feeling good about their prospects either, according to the latest results of the DTN/The Progressive Farmer Agriculture Confidence Index.

At 98.8, the pre-planting Agriculture Confidence Index is the most pessimistic since DTN began conducting the survey in April 2010, but it’s still fairly close to a neutral reading.

An index value of 100 is considered neutral while higher values indicate optimism and lower values reflect pessimism. DTN surveyed 500 farmers and ranchers across the country between February 18 and March 2. DTN conducts the survey before planting, before harvest and after harvest each year to gauge farmers’ attitudes at key times of the crop cycle. “The current situation is much worse than it was a year ago, which should be no surprise given everything that’s developed in the past 12 months on commodity prices and farm income reports,” said Robert Hill, owner of Caledonia Solutions and the economist who designed the index. “This is the new economic reality that has swept through the industry. All the major sectors and regions of ag are reporting their current situation is worse than a year ago.”

The survey asks farmers about current conditions and expectations about future conditions. Sentiment about current conditions has declined steadily since last spring, reaching its lowest ever in the latest survey. Expectations for the future are about as dismal as they were going into last year’s planting season.

AGRIBUSINESS VIEW
DTN also surveys 100 local agribusinesses from February 19 to March 5 about their feelings towards the current business environment. The DTN/The Progressive Farmer Agribusiness Confidence Index came in at 104.7, continuing a gradual decline in overall sentiment that began last spring. “Local agribusinesses have had to face the wrath of farmers looking to cut costs and preserve the wealth and equity built up over the past 10 years of a strong farm economy,” Hill said. “Current supplier sales are off substantially from 12 months ago as farmers have either postponed purchases, eliminated purchases or forced margin-cutting deals onto their suppliers. Local agribusinesses see this as the new norm in terms of selling things to farmers and ranchers.”

INPUT PRICES PINCH PROFITS
More than 42% of the farmers DTN surveyed classified current input prices as bad, a large contributing factor to the pessimistic outlook. “It definitely makes it more difficult for profitability. With the cost of commodities going down, it’s tightened the profit range,” said Mike Keys, a crop farmer from Wayne, Ohio. “Inputs went up during this last run of high prices, and now they’ve moderated a little, but not a lot.”
He’s probably gotten the most relief at the gas pump. Keys recently filled up his semi-truck, and it cost about two-thirds of what it used to cost. Hill said the input supply industry is feeling growers’ pain. Manufacturers have been cutting production and staff, producing “rather chilling financial reports, especially in farm equipment. On the seed side, growers on average have managed to cut their seed bills by moving away from higher-end, multi-stack hybrids toward seeds that are sacrificing one or two of the stacked traits. Seed companies enjoy higher margins on those multi-stacked hybrids, so this is cutting into seed industry profitability.”

Keys told DTN he thinks input prices will improve in the year ahead, particularly chemical costs. Twenty-three percent of the farmers who responded to DTN’s survey agree input prices will be better next year, a record high percentage that indicates many farmers are hoping input suppliers will cut prices next year.

YIELDS, NOT PRICES, TO DRIVE PROFITS
Forty percent of survey respondents rank current farm income as normal, while 31% consider it bad and 28% consider it good. Keys said income at this time is probably normal. “We got kind of spoiled by that a little bit,” he said about high commodity prices. “It was easy to get used to that [higher commodity prices], but we knew reality would step back in, and we would go back to more normal profit level.”

The percentage of farmers who consider current income as normal has been steadily declining since August 2013. At the same time, the percentage of those who consider incomes as bad has been rising at a much quicker place. Farmers’ assessment of income one year down the road is bleak: 42% said income will be worse 12 months from now, compared to 41% who think it will stay the same. It’s the first time more people have been pessimistic than neutral on the income outlook. “If you get good yields in the $3.75 to $4 price range, you can hold things together on corn, but you don’t dare have a hiccup in your yield at those prices,” Keys said. Also, in the lower price environment, crop insurance provides less protection.

WOES CROSS COMMODITIES, REGIONS
DTN compiles individual index ratings for crop and livestock farmers, as well as regional ratings for the Midwest, Southeast and Southwest. All but one index value was pessimistic. Southwestern farmers appear to be the most optimistic with an index value of 107.7. “Midwest growers are down the most on their current situation, but Southeastern growers are not far behind,” Hill said. “I would expect to see more than usual diversification into crops being planted this year. Where possible, growers might turn to alternatives to corn, beans and wheat, based on economics. In the South this usually means turning to cotton or peanuts, but both of those crops have also seen their prices collapse, so the usual alternatives there are not so rosy either.”

A pessimistic index reading for livestock producers at 99.2 is another first in the survey’s history. While their assessment of the present is still very strong, their feelings about the economic prospects for the year ahead have taken a sharp downturn. “Southern growers and livestock producers are sharply negative on expectations vs. a year ago,” Hill said. “Livestock profitability is not likely to be as strong in 12 months as it has been, with growing beef supplies and a rising dollar value that is threatening the export market.”

For more information about index methodology, please visit http://about.dtnpf.com/ag/ag_confidence/.

Herbicide Called Probable Carcinogen

By Pam Smith
DTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology Editor

Decatur, Ill. (DTN) – Glyphosate, one of the world’s most popular herbicides, has been labeled as a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The France-based research arm of the World Health Organization published the assessment with a summary which also considered the status of four organophosphate insecticides.

Response from the agriculture community was swift. The Joint Glyphosate Task Force, a group of more than 20 members holding glyphosate registrations in the United States and Canada, requested that IARC immediately meet with global regulatory authorities to disclose what studies IARC did or did not consider in making its decision. “The conclusion reached is not consistent with scientific studies that have been conducted over more than 40 years,” the group stated in a press release.

Glyphosate came to market in 1974 and was developed by Monsanto and first sold under the Roundup label for control of perennial and annual weeds in non-crop and industrial areas. Agricultural crops genetically engineered to withstand glyphosate have greatly expanded the use of the chemistry since 1996. Glyphosate is also used in forestry, urban and lawn and garden applications.

The French agency classifies four levels of risk for possible cancer-causing agents: known carcinogens, probable or possible carcinogens, not classifiable and probably not carcinogenic. IARC classified glyphosate with a 2A rating – meaning it is “probably carcinogenic to humans.” The insecticides malathion and diazinon were also classified as 2A.

The pesticides tetrachlorvinphos and parathion were classified as “possibly carcinogenic to humans,” or Group 2B. This assessment means there “is convincing evidence that the agent causes cancer in experimental animals, but little or no information about whether it causes cancer in humans.”

Monsanto told DTN by email that the announcement was “disappointing.” In a public statement, Philip Miller, Monsanto vice president for global regulatory affairs, noted that as recently as January 2015, the German government completed a rigorous, four-year evaluation of glyphosate for the European Union. “They reviewed all the data IARC considered, plus significantly more, and concluded ‘glyphosate was unlikely to pose a carcinogenic risk in humans.’

“We join fellow members of both the EU and U.S. glyphosate taskforces in our disagreement with this classification for several reasons: There is no new research or data that was used; the most relevant, scientific data was excluded from review; the conclusion is not supported by scientific data; and there is no link between glyphosate and an increase in cancer when the full data set is included in a rigorous review,” Miller said.

IARC’s statement said the scientific evaluation was based on a comprehensive review of scientific literature. “But it remains the responsibility of individual governments and other international organizations to recommend regulations, legislation or public health intervention,” they noted.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency responded to the report by noting that the agency’s most recent human health risk assessment of glyphosate (2012) concluded that when used according to the EPA-approved label directions, the pesticide meets the statutory safety standards.

The following statement was issued in response to the IARC report: “The EPA is currently reassessing glyphosate as part of its scheduled registration review (the periodic re-evaluation required by FIFRA every 15 years) and coordinating its re-evaluation with Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency. During registration review, the EPA will update the existing human health and ecological risk assessments based on the best available scientific data. We will determine whether any risk mitigation is needed to ensure that glyphosate can continue to be used without unreasonable risks to people or the environment, including species like the monarch butterfly. We expect to release for public comment the preliminary ecological and human health risk assessments for glyphosate later in 2015. If at any time EPA discovers that the use of a registered pesticide may result in unreasonable adverse effects on people or the environment, we will take action to remove it from the marketplace or limit its use.”

IARC critic and long-time ag chemical industry leader Val Giddings said the agency appears to have considered reports such as the 2012 rat study by Gilles-Eric Seralini. That study, which included feeding laboratory rates glyphosate-contaminated feed and corn from glyphosate-resistant plants, produced a group of photos of tumor-laden rats that quickly made the round’s in Internet chat rooms and various websites hosted by those who oppose genetically engineered crops. Seralini’s study was quickly denounced as lacking scientific credibility by most of the world scientific community.

“If you favorably cite the 2012 Seralini rats fed on Roundup Ready maize study, you just lost the argument,” Giddings said, quoting the so-called “Seralini rule.” “The fact that IARC seems to be taking seriously this laughingstock publication suggests they have run thoroughly off the rails, gone beyond anything defensible as science, and well into fictional realms.”

To read the IARC evaluation of five organophosphate insecticides and glyphosate, go to: http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/iarcnews/pdf/MonographVolume112.pdf

A link to excerpts from the decisions of several regulatory agencies regarding glyphosate and cancer: http://www.monsanto.com/iarc-roundup/pages/default.aspx.

March 1 Texas Cattle On Feed Down 1 Percent From Last Year

Austin, TX - Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in Texas feedlots with capacity of 1,000 head or more totaled 2.45 million head on March 1, 2015, down 1 percent from a year ago. According to the monthly report released by the Texas Field Office, the estimate was down 2 percent from the February 1, 2015 level. Producers placed 285 thousand head in commercial feedlots during February, down 30 percent from a year ago and down 19 percent from January.

Texas commercial feeders marketed 315 thousand head during February, down 13 percent from 2014 and down 9 percent from January.

On March 1, there were 2.17 million head of cattle and calves on feed in the Northern High Plains, 88 percent of the state's total. The number on feed across the area was up 1 percent from last year and down 2 percent from the February 1 total.

February placements in the Northern High Plains totaled 246 thousand head, down 21 percent from the January total. Marketings were down 11 percent from last month to 273 thousand head.

Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States in feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 head or more totaled 10.7 million head on March 1, 2015. This inventory was down 1 percent from March 1, 2014.

Placements in feedlots during February totaled 1.52 million head, 8 percent below February 2014. February placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds totaled 330 thousand head; 600-699 pounds totaled 270 thousand head; 700-799 pounds totaled 388 thousand head; 800 pounds and greater totaled 535 thousand head. Marketings of fed cattle during February totaled 1.52 million head, 2 percent below 2014.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 32,100

Texas 12,500. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 8 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 765-775 lbs 210.40; 800-825 lbs 200.60; Del Current 675 lbs 223.00; 800-835 lbs 200.01; 850-875 lbs 193.94; 900 lbs 187.62. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 625 lbs 215.00; 650-680 lbs 223.63; 715-745 lbs 212.92; 800-850 lbs 196.28; 850-875 lbs 189.95; 900-905 lbs 193.69; May 825 lbs 203.10; Del Current 705-735 lbs 210.88; 755-780 lbs 207.12; 815-850 lbs 196.37. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 198.00; 750 lbs 192.00; Del Current 715-735 lbs 198.84; 750-775 lbs 194.33; 825 lbs 186.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 675 lbs 200.85; 725 lbs 193.65; 750-775 lbs 191.16; Del Current 675 lbs 203.00.

Oklahoma 3600. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 24 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 725 lbs 218.18; 775-800 lbs 204.16; 800-835 lbs 197.61; 865-900 lbs 188.28; 900-940 lbs 182.66; 960 lbs 188.48. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 850 lbs 188.71. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 650-680 lbs 206.79; 715735 lbs 197.31; 775-800 lbs 186.16.

New Mexico 1600. 100 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 Current 675 lbs 220.00; 735 lbs 212.45; 755-775 lbs 206.89; 825-835 lbs 197.72; 850 lbs 198.20.

Kansas 6000. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 5 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-800 lbs 204.33; 800 lbs 202.82; 850-870 lbs 196.39; Del Current 795 lbs 207.50; 800-845 lbs 201.11; 850 lbs 198.00; 925 lbs 191.25; 960 lbs 190.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 840 lbs 195.39; Del Current 800825 lbs 202.76; 865-875 lbs 192.84; 900-940 lbs 183.31. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 765 lbs 190.50; Del Current 760 lbs 195.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — March 20
National feeder cattle receipts: 265,700

Yearlings traded very uneven, in most cases weighing over 700 lbs trading from steady to $5 lower. Calves traded in a wide range through the Southwest and Southeast selling steady to $5 higher and through the Midwest and Northern Plains unevenly steady to spots $5 lower. Large strings of wheat grazing yearling cattle have had the opportunity over the last couple of weeks to make their way to the auctions, as several large volume salebarns through the South Central Plains have had headcounts of over 10,000 the past couple of weeks. Purchasing of grazing cattle is at its peak and most cattle growers want to turn-out a stocker big enough to be an 800 lb yearling feeder by late summer or early fall. Demand remains very good for popular weight of steer calves weighing from 450-650 lbs. Most steer calves under 550 lbs are selling near or over $3/lb level, especially those under 500 lbs. Their heifer mates are not quite as popular trading mostly $30-40 back and in many cases $50 back. Most top quality 600 lb steers with a longtime weaned and lightly fleshed condition that is suitable for grass are yielding prices well north of $2.50/lb near the major grazing regions. Buyers want these cattle to gain their heads off and press down hard on the scales late summer when they take their cattle off grass; in hopes that prices for these yearlings will escalate even farther into summer. Caution in the Cattle Futures seems to be persistent with ample supplies of pork and poultry found everywhere. Ag commodities are all under pressure as large supplies of corn, wheat, and soybeans are keeping pressure on all ag commodities. CME cattle futures made a very impressive rally on Wednesday exploding with sharp triple-digit gains. Hopefully this surge to the upside in the cattle complex will also push the cash cattle trade higher. The increase in seasonal demand with Easter just around the corner, graduations, Mother’s Day and then Memorial Weekend not far behind as best beef demand resides in the second quarter of the year. The arrival of spring and its warmer days, greener pastures, and the annual lighting of the backyard grill will have the grilling season well under way. The high US dollar makes prospects for export sales a little tougher, but the dollar weakened early to mid-week as the Federal Reserve pointed to slow economy growth and with the dollar’s strength weighing on the economy higher interest rates is looking farther off. This could be good news for meat sales abroad if any further weakening occurs in the dollar. Less supply in recent times as the weekly FI cattle slaughter was estimated at 518,000, roughly 90,000 head lower when compared to the previous 5-year average of around 608K for this particular week in the year. Also, this weekly slaughter estimate is the lowest since 1980 for this corresponding week. Friday afternoon’s Cattle on Feed Report had March 1 inventory at 99 percent; placements at 92 percent; marketings came in at 98 percent. Inventory was very close to expected; marketings were slightly higher; and placements slightly smaller than expected.

Texas 10,400. 85 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (413) 313.93; 450-500 lbs (459) 308.65; 500-550 lbs (531) 279.72; 550-600 lbs (562) 270.73; 600-650 lbs (633) 239.96; 650-700 lbs (665) 230.94; 700-750 lbs (738) 217.54; 750-800 lbs (781) 210.76; 800-850 lbs (824) 204.03; 850-900 lbs (884) 190.27; 900-950 lbs (933) 185.16; 1000-1050 lbs (1008) 179.77. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (438) 292.94; 450-500 lbs (468) 288.57; 500-550 lbs (538) 258.21; 550-600 lbs (576) 255.63; 600-650 lbs (627) 228.97; 650-700 lbs (659) 227.01; 700-750 lbs (726) 212.17; 750-800 lbs (774) 207.21; 800-850 lbs (835) 198.00; 850-900 lbs (860) 188.37. Holsteins: Large 3 pkg 705 lbs 106.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (415) 286.69; 450-500 lbs (473) 268.71; 500-550 lbs (518) 249.40; 550-600 lbs (576) 229.73; 600-650 lbs (639) 223.65; 650-700 lbs (686) 203.30; 700-750 lbs (715) 199.73; 750-800 lbs (775) 193.04; 800-850 lbs (824) 181.36; 850-900 lbs (864) 178.92. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (384) 288.87; 400-450 lbs (434) 258.98; 550-600 lbs (563) 225.40; 600-650 lbs (627) 210.84; 650-700 lbs (675) 199.25; 700-750 lbs (718) 193.51; 750-800 lbs (767) 188.45.

Oklahoma 41,000. 83 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 356.96; 350-400 lbs (375) 350.83; 400-450 lbs (423) 317.44; 450-500 lbs (480) 297.73; 500-550 lbs (517) 292.45; 550-600 lbs (570) 270.12; 600-650 lbs (624) 252.97; 650-700 lbs (678) 237.50; 700-750 lbs (719) 222.55; 750-800 lbs (772) 212.43; 800-850 lbs (824) 203.57; 850-900 lbs (869) 193.49; 900-950 lbs (920) 185.87; 950-1000 lbs (962) 180.51; 1000-1050 lbs (1018) 174.67; 1050-1100 lbs (1062) 174.50. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (344) 334.90; 350-400 lbs (374) 322.49; 400-450 lbs (433) 297.92; 450-500 lbs (477) 281.90; 500-550 lbs (523) 273.47; 550-600 lbs (577) 260.23; 600-650 lbs (633) 245.68; 650-700 lbs (680) 226.12; 700-750 lbs (726) 213.06; 750-800 lbs (783) 204.87; 800-850 lbs (826) 195.77; 850-900 lbs (877) 188.31; 900-950 lbs (930) 183.33; 950-1000 lbs (973) 176.63; 1000-1050 lbs (1028) 175.22; 1050-1100 lbs (1055) 170.07. Holsteins: Large 3 half load 425 lbs 242.00; pkg 645 lbs 188.00; 650-700 lbs (692) 179.99; half load 725 lbs 177.50; 750-800 lbs (765) 171.05; 900-950 lbs (918) 151.61. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (319) 323.60; 350-400 lbs (370) 303.26; 400-450 lbs (420) 283.06; 450-500 lbs (472) 269.85; 500-550 lbs (521) 257.08; 550-600 lbs (566) 245.41; 600-650 lbs (623) 226.51; 650-700 lbs (674) 208.87; 700-750 lbs (723) 198.10; 750-800 lbs (774) 188.84; 800-850 lbs (819) 185.81; 850-900 lbs (863) 181.30; 900-950 lbs (924) 173.92; 950-1000 lbs (963) 173.26; 1000-1050 lbs (1016) 165.14. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (325) 319.14; 350-400 lbs (384) 278.25; 400-450 lbs (435) 273.39; 450-500 lbs (473) 257.89; 500-550 lbs (534) 247.15; 550-600 lbs (580) 230.29; 600-650 lbs (614) 222.02; 650-700 lbs (686) 201.81; 700-750 lbs (736) 188.32; 750-800 lbs (772) 184.34; 800-850 lbs (839) 179.04; 850-900 lbs (868) 173.98.

New Mexico 4400. 53 pct over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (337) 375.37; 350-400 lbs (356) 357.93; 400-450 lbs (418) 328.62; 450-500 lbs (460) 316.58; 500-550 lbs (521) 279.51; 550-600 lbs (566) 264.06; 600-650 lbs (625) 243.92; 650-700 lbs (669) 230.36; 700-750 lbs (726) 215.26; 750-800 lbs (796) 204.32; 800-850 lbs (817) 201.92; 900-950 lbs (923) 179.76. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (368) 326.00; 450-500 lbs (483) 285.40; 500-550 lbs (529) 250.57; 550-600 lbs (577) 232.82; 600-650 lbs (640) 232.00; 650-700 lbs (671) 214.97. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 344.61; 350-400 lbs (366) 310.59; 400-450 lbs (425) 286.32; 450-500 lbs (455) 282.33; 500-550 lbs (529) 248.63; 550-600 lbs (571) 238.50; 600-650 lbs (629) 219.65; 650-700 lbs (677) 207.42; 700-750 lbs (721) 199.13; 750-800 lbs (769) 187.42; 800-850 lbs (828) 185.48. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (439) 265.35; 450-500 lbs (481) 255.07; 550-600 lbs (571) 221.04; 600-650 lbs (622) 234.47; 800-850 lbs (821) 177.39.

Kansas 17,900. 88 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 317.06; 350-400 lbs (397) 352.04; 400-450 lbs (408) 318.17; 450-500 lbs (466) 310.49; 500-550 lbs (518) 287.01; 550-600 lbs (573) 278.02; 600-650 lbs (619) 259.40; 650-700 lbs (666) 245.85; 700-750 lbs (725) 226.35; 750-800 lbs (785) 211.29; 800-850 lbs (826) 203.42; 850-900 lbs (876) 194.62; 900-950 lbs (914) 190.64; 950-1000 lbs (975) 181.96. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (484) 290.28; 500-550 lbs (537) 271.43; 550-600 lbs (574) 273.39; 600-650 lbs (627) 250.21; 650-700 lbs (667) 233.63; 700-750 lbs (737) 218.58; 750-800 lbs (785) 203.48; 800-850 lbs (839) 199.20; 850-900 lbs (885) 188.60; 900-950 lbs (921) 185.80; 950-1000 lbs (975) 178.81. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (383) 309.14; 400-450 lbs (439) 269.74; 450-500 lbs (474) 271.82; 500-550 lbs (522) 253.69; 550-600 lbs (572) 241.71; 600-650 lbs (629) 227.47; 650-700 lbs (687) 206.43; 700-750 lbs (713) 203.38; 750-800 lbs (774) 191.71; 800-850 lbs (819) 185.30; 850-900 lbs (869) 180.55; 900-950 lbs (914) 175.83; 950-1000 lbs (964) 173.52. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (426) 260.72; 450-500 lbs (478) 253.25; 500-550 lbs (537) 239.31; 550-600 lbs (566) 228.42; 600-650 lbs (632) 212.40; 650-700 lbs (679) 202.95; 700-750 lbs (735) 195.00; 750-800 lbs (773) 186.28; 800-850 lbs (825) 181.69; 850-900 lbs (869) 176.68.

Missouri 47,100. 53 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 339.10; 350-400 lbs (378) 327.58; 400-450 lbs (424) 313.14; 450-500 lbs (472) 295.76; 500-550 lbs (525) 284.80; 550-600 lbs (577) 268.42; 600-650 lbs (626) 253.41; 650-700 lbs (674) 237.95; 700-750 lbs (725) 226.31; 750-800 lbs (774) 208.30; 800-850 lbs (823) 198.42; 850-900 lbs (876) 189.96; 900-950 lbs (925) 188.27; 950-1000 lbs (969) 183.45. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (327) 310.46; 350-400 lbs (377) 306.99; 400-450 lbs (428) 291.07; 450-500 lbs (479) 275.03; 500-550 lbs (530) 265.73; 550-600 lbs (574) 256.59; 600-650 lbs (625) 240.61; 650-700 lbs (672) 226.67; 700-750 lbs (728) 213.48; 750-800 lbs (775) 200.58; 800-850 lbs (822) 194.21; 850-900 lbs (884) 183.22; 900-950 lbs (912) 185.62; 950-1000 lbs (967) 173.50. Holsteins: Large 3 550-600 lbs (582) 183.54; half load 715 lbs 169.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (320) 304.76; 350-400 lbs (375) 288.89; 400-450 lbs (424) 272.62; 450-500 lbs (474) 258.75; 500-550 lbs (523) 247.27; 550-600 lbs (575) 236.40; 600-650 lbs (625) 222.22; 650-700 lbs (671) 211.90; 700-750 lbs (723) 199.41; 750-800 lbs (763) 192.19; 800-850 lbs (824) 188.32; 850-900 lbs (889) 172.97. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (336) 288.36; 350-400 lbs (379) 271.64; 400-450 lbs (426) 262.66; 450-500 lbs (477) 244.55; 500-550 lbs (528) 233.82; 550-600 lbs (579) 223.91; 600-650 lbs (624) 211.21; 650-700 lbs (675) 197.45; 700-750 lbs (713) 195.53; 750-800 lbs (770) 185.19; 800-850 lbs (821) 179.64; 850-900 lbs (867) 171.85.

Arkansas 4700. 35 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 360.30; 350-400 lbs (375) 336.86; 400-450 lbs (427) 313.74; 450-500 lbs (473) 297.90; 500-550 lbs (524) 275.53; 550-600 lbs (572) 255.85; 600-650 lbs (617) 246.50; 650-700 lbs (669) 231.86. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 308.77; 350-400 lbs (376) 293.57; 400-450 lbs (424) 279.09; 450-500 lbs (472) 263.77; 500-550 lbs (524) 246.10; 550-600 lbs (576) 230.08; 600-650 lbs (620) 219.93; 650-700 lbs (675) 213.91.

 

 

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Thursday, March 26, 2015 1:31 PM