Researchers Talk About Food Safety, Regulations, Markets And Growing Weed Resistance

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Washington (DTN) – John Linder, a grain farmer from Edison, Ohio, offered the closing public comments in the opening discussion by scientists and laypeople on the past experience and potential future of agricultural biotechnology in the U.S. “As farmers, we are looking for the new innovation if we are really going to have the population growth going forward that has been spoken about so many times,” Linder said. “We need the next products to get us there and actually achieve what needs to be done for the world. I think biotech is going to be key to that.”

The National Research Council has put together an ad-hoc committee to study the food safety, environmental, social, economic and regulatory aspects of genetically-engineered crops over the past 20 years and offer recommendations on how policymakers should handle biotech crops moving into the future.

The committee will hold a series of meetings through next spring before coming out with a report sometime in 2016. The initial forum continues as representatives front non-governmental entities get a chance to speak. Talks will include more presentations from groups that are outright opponents of biotechnology as well.

It’s clear from the half-day discussion that the National Research Council committee is going to have no shortage of scientific and policy issues to consider. Major Goodman, a professor of crop science, statistics, genetics and botany at North Carolina State University, started the forum off by defending the health track record of foods derived from biotech crops. Goodman said studies and Americans’ history of eating foods from biotech crops prove the track record of the technology. “Essentially, we have had 18 years of a clinical experiment with GMOs,” Goodman said. Noting there are no known medical problems, Goodman added the use of biotech crops has been “a pretty definitive and successful experiment.”

Yet Goodman, a plant breeder, also said he believes biotech advocates have oversold the production increase that comes from biotechnology. He said biotechnology has added about 5% to crop yields in 18 years while plant breeding has steadily added 1% in yield every year, or about 18% over the same period. “So basically, standard breeding has had three times as much success as GMOs from a plant breeding point of view,” Goodman said.

Goodman also expressed concern about one or a small number of crop varieties dominating crop production in a state or region. Goodman said that could lead to major disease pressures. Goodman was one of several speakers who pointed to the problems with weed resistance, particularly the expansion of Palmer amaranth in Southern states as the weed also advances farther northward every year as well. Goodman said farmers struggle to get rid of Palmer amaranth, which can grow eight-feet tall, has roughly one million seeds and the base of the stalk can have the diameter of a baseball. Palmer amaranth has to be removed from the field to be destroyed, a task that can be laborious in infested fields. “I see no reason why it won’t reach the Corn Belt,” Goodman said. “It has destroyed the use of Roundup and Roundup-like materials in the Southeast.”

James Cook, a professor emeritus of plant pathology at Washington State University, complained about the expensive regulatory regime at USDA and EPA that have made it so only a few major companies can afford to get biotech trait approved for commercial use. Cook said the regulatory challenges lead businesses to put technology on the shelf. Then there are the market challenges as technology is shelved because companies do not want to risk market disruption. He cited the commercial approval of BT potatoes that was stopped after one large fast-food company resisted buying such potatoes. “That ended it,” Cook said. “All of those potatoes had to be destroyed.”

A biotech raspberry also was stopped because growers were concerned about losing markets in Asia if Japan and South Korea became concerned about possible biotech raspberries. Then there are the wheat and barley research programs that were stopped for similar reasons. “So there is a huge impact right there and it just complicates the whole thing,” Cook said.

Chuck Benbrook, who worked on similar National Academies of Science committees in the 1980s and ‘90s, now is a research professor at the Center for Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University. Benbrook is considered one of the foremost experts on pesticide policies and pest management. He said most scientists working on academic committees largely only saw the upsides of biotechnology early on, though some warned about the risks of relying heavily on a single chemical. Benbrook noted how well Roundup worked for producers controlling weeds early on. “It was just really hard to screw up weed management planting Roundup Ready crops in the first years,” Benbrook said. “It’s totally obvious why these technologies were adopted.” He added shortly later, “Those days are a distant memory. All of that progress has been lost in the wake of universal adoption of that technology.”

In hindsight, Benbrook said it would have been more reasonable early on to demand that farmers could only use Roundup Ready technology on a field as part of a three-year rotation. That would have reduced some of the weed resistance farmers are facing in some areas of the country now. “They (farmers) are going to look back on what they lose with great yearning,” Benbrook said.

Earlier, Goodman noted the approval of 2,4-D-resistant soybeans coming on the market. Goodman added, “I guess we’re soon going to have resistance to 2,4-D, a 70-year-old herbicide,” Goodman said. “Somehow I can’t get excited about that. Benbrook sees lower crop prices leading to more producers questioning the value they get from multi-trait biotech varieties. “There are a lot of farmers who do not want all six BT genes in smart-stack,” Benbrook said.

While Cook questioned the redundant regulatory schemes at USDA and EPA, Benbrook said the Food and Drug Administration has been lax in looking at biotech foods and largely accepts the reports produced by companies. Cook said FDA needs to take a more active role looking at BT and glyphosate intake by people. He said the National Institutes of Health should be looking at toxicology issues. “In other areas where this has come up, we have poured tons of research into it,” Benbrook said.

If some of the problems and gaps in past regulation and research on biotech crops are not “aggressively addressed” in the current study, then the problems are going to worsen. Benbrook also noted that scientists did not realize the depth of emotion that has been sparked in the general public about biotech crops and foods. Benbrook also encouraged the committee to keep its report focusing on a small number of key points if the committee wants policymakers to take note. “You can’t solve all of the problems with agricultural biotechnology with one report,” Benbrook said.

Rebuilding The Beef Herd Program Set Sept. 25 At Camp Cooley Ranch

Franklin – Brazos Valley cattle producers considering rebuilding cowherds will have a unique opportunity to hear a comprehensive economic analysis as well tips on developing a sound restocking plan Sept. 25 at Camp Cooley Ranch, according to organizers. The ranch is located at 4297 Camp Cooley Ranch Road in Franklin.

Rebuilding the Beef Herd: Planning to Capture the Opportunities will be held from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and is open to beef cattle producers throughout the Brazos Valley, said Ed Schneider, AgriLife Extension agent for Robertson County. The program will feature a number of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialists discussing cattle market outlook, forage and stocking management, replacement cow/heifer options, resource use and leased grazing considerations. A tour of Camp Cooley Ranch is also scheduled. “Cattle prices are charting at record highs and there are many beef producers considering restocking options,” Schneider said. “However, there are still economic challenges such as high input costs, land use and return on investment when buying cows or replacement heifers. Those with serious intent to enter, rebuild or expand their beef operation need to have a sound plan.”

Cost is $25 and includes lunch, program materials and breaks. For meal count purposes, preregistration is requested by calling 979-828-4270. Payment may be made at time of arrival. A number of agribusiness booths will be exhibited, and door prizes will be given throughout the day, Schneider said.

Speakers from AgriLife Extension will be Drs. Ron Gill, Jason Cleere and Larry Redmon, all from College Station. Stan Bevers, AgriLife Extension economist, Vernon, will also be presenting. The group will rotate on discussion topics and attendee participation is encouraged, Schneider said.

Topics include:
- Beef-Better (and Different). This discussion will look at demand vs. supply and the future of beef.
- Forage Recovery, Pasture Restocking and Weed Management. This presentation will focus on the art and science of balancing grazing pasture and forage supply, and battling the never ending supply of weeds.
- Evaluating Replacement Options. This presentation will feature discussion on the type of cows that fit the right environment as well as marketing considerations.
- Can a $3,000 Cow Break Even? This presentation will evaluate breakeven costs for a variety of price ranges for purchased females.
- Flexibility in Resource Use. This presentation will look at flexible grazing options utilizing existing forage resources and replacement female options. Insuring forage as a management tool will also be discussed.
- Leased grazing – What, Why and How. This discussion will focus on the key elements of a successful lease. They include resource inventory, lease expectations, structure, arrangement, tenure and documentation.

For more information about the program, call 979-828-4270, or visit the AgriLife Extension for Robertson County Facebook page at http://on.fb.me/1qJGc2e. Participating program counties include Brazos, Burleson, Madison, Leon, Limestone, Freestone, Falls, Milam and Robertson.

Visit The OCA’s Beef Tent While At The Tulsa State Fair

Oklahoma City, OK – The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association will be serving ribeye steak sandwiches at the Tulsa State Fair again this year. The famous Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association ribeye steak sandwich was voted favorite fair food at the 2012 Tulsa State Fair. Thank you to all the beef lovers that came by the OCA Beef Tent last year and we look forward to seeing you again at the 2014 Tulsa State Fair. This year we will be expanding our menu to feature a steak, egg and cheese breakfast burrito during the last weekend of the fair. “I always look forward to working in the beef tent! There’s nothing better than hearing customers say that they have been looking forward to a ribeye steak sandwich since last year’s fair,” said Mike Weeks of the Hughes County Cattlemen’s Association.

In addition to feeding hungry fair goers, the OCA Beef Tent is a great marketing opportunity for beef. “We reach folks at the fair that we may never reach in any other marketing venues,” said Weeks. “Priced at $6, our signature sandwich is a bargain. Besides that, it is a healthy meal packed with zinc, iron and protein.”

The recipe for grilling these mouthwatering steaks has not changed, so be sure to stop by the Beef Tent, located just outside of the Oklahoma Ford Dealers Barn at the Tulsa Fairgrounds between Sept. 25 and Oct. 5.

The OCA Beef Tent is managed by the staff of the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association. Throughout the course of the fair, the Oklahoma CattleWomen, several county cattlemen’s associations as well as OSU Collegiate Cattlemen and CattleWomen provide man power to serve customers. “It’s very rewarding to beef producers, like myself, to visit with satisfied beef consumers. Ranching is not an easy occupation, but hearing positive comments about our product (beef) is refreshing and motivates me to continue setting the standard high when it comes to caring for my beef cattle,” explained Weeks.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 44,700

Texas 28,500. 64 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 675 lbs 242.00; 650 lbs 249.50; 725 lbs 234.00; 750-775 lbs 224.86; 800-825 lbs 220.01; 875 lbs 213.50; Oct 650 lbs 249.50; 750-775 lbs 222.53; Nov 700 lbs 223.64; 750-775 lbs 222.34; Dec 750 lbs 217.00; Jan 750-775 lbs 215.90; Del Current 750-785 lbs 224.37; 800-825 lbs 224.62; Sept-Oct 775 lbs 228.00; Oct 223.00-227.50; Oct 750-775 lbs 224.51; Nov 750-775 lbs 222.33; 800 lbs 217.30; Dec 775 lbs 213.03; Jan 750-775 lbs 216.33. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 600 lbs 236.25; 650-700 lbs 236.58; 720-735 lbs 222.64; 750-790 lbs 216.73; 800-840 lbs 217.97; 900 lbs 201.25; Oct 550 lbs 240.50; 650 lbs 230.50; 725 lbs 224.65; Oct 550 lbs 240.50; 650 lbs 230.50; 725 lbs 224.65; Del Current 825 lbs 224.35; Oct 550 lbs 266.00 Mex Origin; 650 lbs 248.30; Nov 800 lbs 225.00. Medium and Large 2 Del Current 775 lbs 220.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 590 lbs 229.50; 670 lbs 226.00; 700 lbs 218.75; 750 lbs 221.59; Oct 725 lbs 215.18; Nov 600-625 lbs 217.63; 650-685 lbs 215.89; 700-725 lbs 212.18; Del Current 700-725 lbs 216.95; 825 lbs 210.00; Oct 700-725 lbs 217.37; Nov 650-675 lbs 217.54; 700-725 lbs 216.72; Dec 725 lbs 205.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 625 lbs 219.50; 685 lbs 211.00; 650 lbs 215.30; Del Current 500 lbs 236.00 Mex Origin; Nov 750 lbs 218.00.

Oklahoma 2400. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 31 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700 lbs 238.00; 800-825 lbs 219.87; 850 lbs 217.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 1025 lbs 192.00; 700 lbs 221.75 Mexican Origin; Nov 750 lbs 219.00; 800 lbs 215.30; Del Current 660 lbs 238.00. Medium and Large 2 FOB Current 775 lbs 211.35. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700 lbs 212.85; Nov 700 lbs 214.59.

New Mexico 2000. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 750-785 lbs 223.70; 800 lbs 224.33; Sept-Oct 775 lbs 226.00; Oct 775 lbs 220.50; Jan 750 lbs 217.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700 lbs 215.80; 825 lbs 208.00; Oct 700 lbs 218.00.

Kansas 3400. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 50 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700 lbs 233.00; 775 lbs 224.91; 800-825 lbs 223.42; Del Current 575 lbs 250.00; 900 lbs 207.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 825 lbs 216.00; Del Current 1025 lbs 193.00; 825 lbs 219.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725-740 lbs 216.13; 750-775 lbs 216.54; Oct 700 lbs 215.35. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Nov 700 lbs 213.60.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — September 12
National feeder cattle receipts: 201,100

Coming back after last week’s Holiday with many auctions taking last Monday off, this week’s comparable sales had yearlings trading mostly $3-8 higher with calves steady to $5 higher. In the Southeast calves sold mostly $3-8 higher, spots $10 higher. Many of this week’s auctions that were off last week, sold $5-15 higher catching up with last week’s higher market. Best demand is noted in the Northern Plains and upper Mid-West on yearlings as a large number of buyers participating for these cattle. Last week’s rocket sales on fat cattle trading mostly $8 higher at $163 as packers had to ramp up their bidding and chase after fat cattle to fulfill their needs. This inspired confidence and conveyed volumes to the feeder cattle market this week. It’s not always easy to satisfy packer’s needs from week to week. The cattle and future markets have had big ups and big downs with wild price swings this year and most recently; this goes with the nature of the business. This keeps frames of mind, attitudes and positions changing fast and in a hurry. One question is can the fat cattle market establish the price above the $160 level and maintain current beef demand. Slaughter cattle are focusing on tight supplies for market ready cattle with supplies looking to remain tight throughout the fall. Feeder cattle contracts this week made all-time record highs as did live cattle contracts only to see triple-digit losses on Thursday. With feedlot trade so active last week, this had feeder cattle buyers very active again this week to buy feeders. In Torrington, WY on Wednesday at the Torrington Livestock Commission Company sold 373 head of steers averaging 960 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $216.05. In Valentine, NE on Thursday at the Valentine Livestock Auction sold 257 head of steers averaging 794 lbs with a weighted average price of $242.27 and 129 head of value added heifers averaging 872 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $221.11. In Pratt, KS on Thursday at the Pratt Livestock Auction sold a near pot load of steer calves weighing 507 lbs with the gavel dropping at $312. On Thursday USDA estimated this year’s corn yield at 171.7 bpa with a record 14.4 billion bushels up 3 percent from the August forecast and a 4.3 bpa bump up from August. Corn prices continue to be dominated by this very large U.S. harvest and with lower fed cost will create a strong case for feeder cattle support. North Central Regional averages this week for 800-900 lb steers was $226.52, last week $223.05 and last year $155.62. In Kansas on Friday afternoon live prices traded $1-2 lower from $161-162. This week’s auction volume included 49 percent over 600 lbs and 40 percent heifers.

Texas 5000. 61 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (422) 303.12; 450-500 lbs (469) 283.60; 500-550 lbs (530) 259.44; 550-600 lbs (580) 246.38; 600-650 lbs (623) 240.33; Calves 600-650 lbs (645) 237.51; Calves 650-700 lbs (674) 227.92; 700-750 lbs (729) 219.32; 750-800 lbs (774) 225.95; 800-850 lbs (819) 216.71. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (329) 307.34; 450-500 lbs (469) 260.71; 500-550 lbs (519) 256.54; 550-600 lbs (582) 239.16; 600-650 lbs (624) 229.88; 650-700 lbs (668) 228.51; 700-750 lbs (712) 234.85; 750-800 lbs (774) 201.87; 800-850 lbs (819) 196.30. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (436) 256.96; 450-500 lbs (478) 247.94; 500-550 lbs (524) 229.85; 550-600 lbs (573) 225.29; 600-650 lbs (633) 222.01; Calves 600-650 lbs (636) 209.48; 700-750 lbs (719) 207.20; 750-800 lbs (765) 210.86; 800-850 lbs (808) 194.92. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (386) 255.23; 400-450 lbs (446) 232.84; 500-550 lbs (518) 213.53; 550-600 lbs (576) 205.88; 600-650 lbs (637) 211.23; 650-700 lbs (689) 218.55; 700-750 lbs (731) 201.42; 800-850 lbs (807) 183.28.

Oklahoma 29,700. 63 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (319) 367.04; 350-400 lbs (369) 337.04; 400-450 lbs (426) 299.21; 450-500 lbs (470) 286.32; 500-550 lbs (522) 266.40; 550-600 lbs (572) 254.21; 600-650 lbs (622) 247.69; 650-700 lbs (677) 243.73; Calves 650-700 lbs (676) 226.56; 700-750 lbs (727) 237.32; Calves 700-750 lbs (721) 220.38; 750-800 lbs (777) 226.57; 800-850 lbs (824) 223.47; 850-900 lbs (873) 217.50; 900-950 lbs (918) 212.17; 950-1000 lbs (963) 204.12. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (382) 310.28; 400-450 lbs (433) 285.25; 450-500 lbs (480) 276.04; 500-550 lbs (536) 258.52; 550-600 lbs (577) 248.13; 600-650 lbs (628) 234.08; 650-700 lbs (678) 234.67; 700-750 lbs (729) 226.42; 750-800 lbs (784) 222.86; 800-850 lbs (823) 216.53; 850-900 lbs (881) 209.90; 900-950 lbs (923) 201.33. Holsteins: Large 3 400-450 lbs (424) 218.43; 500-550 lbs (529) 207.13; 550-600 lbs (567) 204.12; 700-750 lbs (737) 187.30; 850-900 lbs (885) 171.31. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (319) 320.08; 350-400 lbs (372) 283.90; 400-450 lbs (425) 269.78; 450-500 lbs (474) 254.78; 500-550 lbs (522) 238.99; 550-600 lbs (568) 235.72; 600-650 lbs (621) 227.32; 650-700 lbs (678) 226.61; Calves 650-700 lbs (685) 211.57; 700-750 lbs (715) 218.21; 750-800 lbs (772) 213.57; 800-850 lbs (823) 204.60; 850-900 lbs (871) 196.33. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (329) 302.06; 350-400 lbs (371) 270.07; 400-450 lbs (432) 258.03; 450-500 lbs (471) 245.13; 500-550 lbs (523) 231.32; 550-600 lbs (586) 225.72; 600-650 lbs (630) 216.98; 650-700 lbs (676) 213.90; 700-750 lbs (728) 207.57; 750-800 lbs (779) 208.21; 800-850 lbs (833) 193.96; 850-900 lbs (869) 195.62.

New Mexico 2800. 31 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (375) 321.91; 400-450 lbs (433) 307.46; 450-500 lbs (481) 284.59; 500-550 lbs (526) 261.54; 550-600 lbs (578) 243.15; 600-650 lbs (615) 224.61. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (428) 265.58; 500-550 lbs (526) 236.60; 550-600 lbs (575) 239.38. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 279.31; 400-450 lbs (416) 266.62; 450-500 lbs (477) 243.46; 500-550 lbs (532) 223.93; 550-600 lbs (574) 220.50; 600-650 lbs (611) 214.42; 700-750 lbs (722) 200.43. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (435) 236.76; 550-600 lbs (564) 207.13.

Kansas 8500. 83 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (421) 329.66; 450-500 lbs (473) 316.27; 500-550 lbs (511) 300.40; 550-600 lbs (571) 265.89; 600-650 lbs (615) 258.58; 650-700 lbs (681) 244.93; 700-750 lbs (730) 236.85; 750-800 lbs (778) 229.73; 800-850 lbs (829) 226.04; 850-900 lbs (858) 220.14; 900-950 lbs (923) 216.58; load 990 lbs 210.10. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (438) 320.46; 500-550 lbs (525) 281.49; 550-600 lbs (580) 264.11; 600-650 lbs (633) 256.71; 650-700 lbs (689) 240.22; 700-750 lbs (735) 226.62; 750-800 lbs (784) 222.72; 800-850 lbs (837) 219.60; 850-900 lbs (885) 213.71; 900-950 lbs (931) 211.61; 950-1000 lbs (968) 206.68. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (432) 273.67; 450-500 lbs (484) 274.42; 500-550 lbs (538) 257.78; 550-600 lbs (558) 253.01; 600-650 lbs (625) 241.29; 650-700 lbs (672) 231.46; 700-750 lbs (733) 222.25; 750-800 lbs (764) 218.37; 800-850 lbs (825) 210.49; 850-900 lbs (864) 208.25; 900-950 lbs (932) 203.22. Medium and Large 1-2 pkg 500 lbs 269.43; 500-550 lbs (523) 250.48; 550-600 lbs (577) 236.53; 600-650 lbs (626) 232.52; 650-700 lbs (684) 224.84; 700-750 lbs (725) 216.85; 750-800 lbs (774) 213.97; 800-850 lbs (814) 208.42.

Missouri 32,100. 49 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 344.13; 350-400 lbs (374) 324.30; 400-450 lbs (424) 306.56; 450-500 lbs (477) 282.08; 500-550 lbs (522) 274.66; 550-600 lbs (576) 262.78; 600-650 lbs (622) 253.28; 650-700 lbs (672) 245.73; 700-750 lbs (721) 237.99; 750-800 lbs (772) 230.41; 800-850 lbs (832) 220.25; 850-900 lbs (876) 220.07; 900-950 lbs (906) 215.28; 950-1000 lbs (962) 213.23; few loads 1035 lbs 202.25. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 344.27; 350-400 lbs (382) 306.97; 400-450 lbs (424) 285.64; 450-500 lbs (476) 263.29; 500-550 lbs (528) 253.30; 550-600 lbs (578) 250.90; 600-650 lbs (631) 241.88; 650-700 lbs (673) 236.15; 700-750 lbs (717) 227.35; 750-800 lbs (769) 224.54; 800-850 lbs (813) 216.71; 850-900 lbs (882) 204.28; 900-950 lbs (937) 198.39; 1000-1050 lbs (1032) 172.13. Holsteins: Large 3 400-450 lbs (421) 210.94; 450-500 lbs (479) 206.83; 500-550 lbs (522) 199.93; 550-600 lbs (586) 191.50; 600-650 lbs (626) 195.51; 650-700 lbs (680) 187.52; 700-750 lbs (715) 183.73; 750-800 lbs (777) 185.82; 800-850 lbs (831) 179.36; 850-900 lbs (874) 165.59; 900-950 lbs (931) 183.93; load 955 lbs 174.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 291.71; 350-400 lbs (373) 279.33; 400-450 lbs (424) 265.55; 450-500 lbs (477) 256.02; 500-550 lbs (523) 246.29; 550-600 lbs (573) 240.52; 600-650 lbs (624) 235.75; 650-700 lbs (676) 234.81; 700-750 lbs (722) 225.66; 750-800 lbs (782) 209.47; 800-850 lbs (818) 215.49; 850-900 lbs (870) 197.32; 950-1000 lbs (965) 190.51; load 1005 lbs 193.00. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (322) 282.16; 350-400 lbs (374) 262.46; 400-450 lbs (426) 247.78; 450-500 lbs (474) 240.16; 500-550 lbs (524) 236.15; 550-600 lbs (573) 239.26; 600-650 lbs (627) 222.24; 650-700 lbs (677) 227.59; 700-750 lbs (716) 222.63; 750-800 lbs (780) 209.01; 800-850 lbs (821) 215.11; 850-900 lbs (877) 196.73.

Arkansas 6500. 29 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 326.41; 350-400 lbs (376) 308.87; 400-450 lbs (422) 287.53; 450-500 lbs (469) 273.35; 500-550 lbs (524) 250.33; 550-600 lbs (571) 240.45; 600-650 lbs (623) 230.17; 650-700 lbs (671) 223.70. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 282.55; 350-400 lbs (371) 265.21; 400-450 lbs (422) 256.76; 450-500 lbs (473) 245.29; 500-550 lbs (524) 229.81; 550-600 lbs (573) 223.38; 600-650 lbs (619) 215.25; 650-700 lbs (664) 214.66.

 

 

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Friday, September 19, 2014 10:12 AM