USDA Providing $9M To Develop Ag-Focused Wetland Mitigation Banks

By Todd Neeley
DTN Staff Reporter

Omaha (DTN) – USDA announced it is offering funds to help states, local governments and other qualified partners develop wetland mitigation banks to help farmers and ranchers mitigate wetland losses in order to maintain their eligibility for USDA programs.

A mitigation bank will allow farmers to buy credits to compensate for lost wetlands. Credits are generated through the restoration, creation or enhancement of wetlands. With mitigation banks, landowners retain ownership and use of their properties while conservation easements are used to protect wetlands.

The number of credits generated on wetland mitigation projects is determined by the size and scope of wetlands restoration. During a news conference, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said though the mitigation bank concept is not new, currently farmers have a difficult time competing with large developers in completing projects and buying credits. There needs to be a balance between farmers remaining profitable and doing things that benefit their lands, he said.

In the Prairie Pothole region, for example, many farmers are faced with the prospect of either draining wetlands for crop production, or leaving those wetlands untouched and underutilize otherwise productive croplands. “The reality is each producer has to make decisions for themselves and for their families,” Viksack said.

Vilsack said he anticipates credits from the mitigation bank will be available within the next two years.
In the past five years, the USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service has faced a backlog of wetlands determination requests in South Dakota, Iowa and Minnesota, where prairie potholes dominate much of the landscape.

Five years ago, there were some 50,000 requests made with NRCS for wetlands determinations. As of today, Vilsack said USDA-NRCS has been able to narrow that number down to about 4,000. The mitigation bank, he said, would provide another tool for farmers to continue to preserve wetlands. “It is an important opporunity to focus on critical efforts in conservation,” Vilsack said. “Producers don’t often get benefits of mitigation banks because larger developers benefit.”

The mitigation bank will make available $9 million to state, local governments and third parties, awarding up to $1 million for given projects. He said there are a number of states in need of targeted funds. In addition, NRCS has scheduled a Feb. 10 webinar on how to apply for resources from the mitigation bank, Vilsack said.

Wetland mitigation banking commonly is used to compensate for wetland effects from development. Right now there are a small number of mitigation banks in the United States specifically to assist agriculture. With the new offering, NRCS is seeking applications from eligible third-parties to develop wetland mitigation banks, or modify existing banks to better serve agricultural producers. These third-parties include federally recognized Indian tribes; state and local units of government; for-profit entities; and nongovernmental organizations.

Funding awarded may be used to cover the administrative and technical costs associated with the development of a wetland mitigation bank or banking program. Funding may not be used to purchase an easement or any other interest in land.

Vilsack said NRCS will prioritize funding to locations that have known wetland compliance workloads. That includes the Prairie Pothole region, California Vernal Pool Region, Nebraska Rainwater Basin Region, and other areas with a number of wetlands compliance requests. Project proposals for this program are due by 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on March 28, 2016. More information is available at www.grants.gov. “Over the past seven years, USDA has worked with private landowners to enroll a record number of acres in conservation practices, and we are seeing significant reductions in nutrient runoff and greenhouse gas emissions,” Vilsack said. “Wetland mitigation banks will give farmers and ranchers more conservation options so they can find the best solution for their land and circumstances, and produce even more results.”

Minimize Farmland Exit Taxes

By Marcia Zarley Taylor
DTN Executive Editor

Haddonfield, N.J. (DTN) – “I have been searching all over the Internet to figure out how to get out of the C corporation (land only) formed by our deceased parents in 1975 without a huge tax bite and still provide some income for the current farming generation nearing their 70s and the non-farm siblings,” writes a DTN reader from Kentucky. She’s hardly alone.

One of the hangovers of 1970s farm tax advice is that many farm families now own farmland trapped in a C corporation. Unfortunately, thanks to tax rule changes and runaway land markets, that exposes owners to double taxation and unimaginable capital gains bills if the farmland is sold. It’s also one of the trickier issues a good tax adviser can help fix if you have a long timetable.

Since 1990, C corporations have not been able to use capital gains rates available to individuals. That means a C corporation’s sale of farmland with relatively low tax basis can easily trigger federal and state income taxes of 40%-50% or more. Paul Neiffer, a farm tax principal with the accounting firm of CliftonLarsonAllen LLP and instructor in an upcoming DTN webinar on retirement tax planning, cites this example:

Farmer Brown personally owns 500 acres of good farmland he bought in the 1970s for $500,000 that is now worth $5 million. He passes away in 2016 and leaves it to his children. Their cost basis in this farmland will now be $5 million, so no capital gains is due if they sold it immediately at that market value.

Unfortunately, Farmer Green and his wife bought an identical 500 acres in the 1970s also, but they put the land into a C corporation. “When Farmer Green passes away, his half of the stock in the C corporation is stepped-up to fair market value, which is likely less than $2.5 million. It is discounted for lack of marketability and minority interest. None of the farmland value inside of the corporation gets a step-up. If the corporation sells the farmland for $5 million, it will then owe federal and state tax on a full $4.5 million gain,” Neiffer says.

Generally, that means the corporation would pay 35% federal income tax rates on the gain from any land sale. Next, shareholders would likely pay a capital gains rate of 20% on any remaining dividends or distribution, plus the new 3.8% investment surcharge due to the Affordable Health Care Act, plus possible state taxes.

S corporations result in the same scenario for tax basis: “No step-up in basis for the farmland. Full gain when the land is sold,” Neiffer says.

“However, if that is the only asset inside the S corporation, then the corporation can be liquidated and likely there will be a loss on liquidation to help offset the gain on the sale of the farmland. This is true, if and only if, capital assets such as farmland are inside the corporation.” What’s more, land in an S corporation is only taxed once for federal income tax, at the 20% capital gains rates, plus the 3.8% investment surcharge if land was not actively farmed. Additional state income taxes may also apply.

Converting a C corporation to an S, and unwinding the land inside of it can take five years, but it’s one of the strategies Neiffer and his partner Nick Houle, another CliftonLarsonAllen CPA and Wealth Management Consultant will discuss at a DTN webinar Thursday, Feb. 18. They will also tackle how to minimize the tax shocks of depreciation recapture when farm equipment is liquidated at retirement as well as affordable strategies for transferring ownership to a successor generation.

Exiting agriculture and farmland ownership without a plan can be the largest tax event in a farmer’s career – even more than many would owe in estate taxes, cautioned Neiffer. “If someone wants to quit out of the blue and hasn’t been working with a tax adviser, their normal reaction is to have a deer-in-the-headlights kind of look. Then they ask what is the pain threshold for some alternatives.”

The DTN webinar, “How to Exit Ag Without Paying a Monster Tax Bill,” is scheduled for Feb. 18 at 9 a.m. Central Time. Recordings will be available for those who can’t attend live. Registration costs $50. For details, go to http://www.dtn.com/emailers_tvt/ag/2k16/ag_webinar_0116/.

Report Warns On Fertilizer Plants

Dallas (AP) – Dozens of Texas plants similar to a fertilizer facility that exploded in the town of West in 2013, one of Texas’ worst industrial accidents, are still operating near schools, hospitals and residential neighborhoods, federal regulators say.

In a report released ahead of a public meeting, the Chemical Safety Board says there are 80 plants in Texas that store more than 5 tons of ammonium nitrate, a chemical used in fertilizer. About half of them are fertilizer plants similar to the West Fertilizer Co., north of Waco, where a fire led to a devastating explosion that registered as an earthquake of magnitude 2.1. It killed 15, injured hundreds and leveled part of the town. “The risk to the public from a catastrophic incident exists throughout the state of Texas,” the report said.

Nineteen plants storing fertilizer-grade ammonium nitrate operate within a half-mile of a school, hospital or nursing home, according to the report. More than 30 of them are within a quarter-mile of a home or apartment building.

The West plant “was about 550 feet from the closest school, which sustained catastrophic damage as a result of the explosion, which could have resulted in additional loss of life had the school been in session at the time,” the report noted. That explosion caused about $100 million in property damage, according to the Texas Department of Insurance, and insurance-related losses were approximately $230 million.

Federal regulators say the way the fertilizer was stored, with combustible materials nearby, and the lack of ventilation were contributing factors to the detonation. But they also cited a failure to conduct safety inspections of the plant, shortcomings in emergency response such as with hazmat training, and poor land planning that allowed development to sprout around the plant over the years.

West Mayor Tommy Muska said he was aware of the report but declined to comment due to ongoing litigation. He referred questions to attorney Stephen Harrison, who did not return a call.

Among those killed in the April 2013 explosion were 12 emergency personnel, primarily ones with the West Volunteer Fire Department who responded to the initial blaze. The report says the response to the fire was flawed for various reasons, including for not establishing an incident command center and lack of understanding about the possibility of a detonation. It’s not certain how the fire started, but inspectors have three possible scenarios: faulty electrical wiring, a short circuit in a golf cart stored at the plant, or arson.

West Fire Chief George Nors Sr. declined to address the report’s findings. A call to the plant owner was not returned but officials have denied allegations that the plant was negligent in how it handled and stored ammonium nitrate.

Another error cited by regulators was a lack of communication between plant and municipal officials. Just two months before the explosion, the West Intermediate School was evacuated after the principal called 911 about a fire at the plant. Neither the 911 dispatcher nor any other emergency official had informed the school that the plant was conducting a controlled burn of pallets and brush, the report says.

The Chemical Safety Board issued its preliminary findings in April 2014, including that several levels of federal, state and local government missed opportunities to prevent the tragedy.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 56,700

Texas 36,600. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 665 lbs 166.00; 700-730 lbs 162.93; 750-775 lbs 156.25; 800-835 lbs 147.81; 850-880 lbs 147.81; Feb 750 lbs 156.00; Mar 750 lbs 159.69; Apr 725 lbs 159.50; 750 lbs 159.35; May 750 lbs 155.50; 800 lbs 154.28; Del Current 585 lbs 181.00; 625 lbs 175.23; 675 lbs 165.00; 700-725 lbs 161.23; 750 lbs 165.00; 800-835 lbs 154.65; 850 lbs 153.00; Feb 750 lbs 158.80; Mar 775 lbs 157.55; 800 lbs 157.66; Apr 775 lbs 157.90; 800 lbs 156.75; May 775 lbs 160.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 550 lbs 180.65; 660-685 lbs 160.47; 720-740 lbs 156.51; 750-800 lbs 155.39; 800-825 lbs 149.40; 875-890 lbs 145.18; 915-925 lbs 141.88; Feb 800 lbs 153.75; Del Current 600-625 lbs 178.38, 625 lbs 163.50 Mex; 690 lbs 164.00, 655-665 lbs 154 Mex; 725 lbs 159.40; 760-800 lbs 156.76; 800-825 lbs 154.77; 850-875 lbs 151.79; 900 lbs 151.00; Feb 800 lbs 150.20. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 610 lbs 153.50; 675-680 lbs 148.30; 700-740 lbs 149.84; 750-775 lbs 144.47; Mar 675 lbs 151.80; 700 lbs 149.00; Apr 650-675 lbs 155.31; 725 lbs 155.00; May 675 lbs 151.00; 700 lbs 147.65; Del Current 600-625 lbs 160.29; 700-725 lbs 151.48; 750-755 lbs 149.87; Mar 600 lbs 161.00; 675 lbs 152.80; 725 lbs 149.34; Apr 700 lbs 151.46; July 700 lbs 149.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 620 lbs 150.50; 665-680 lbs 144.96; 725 lbs 142.43; Del Current 550 lbs 164.00; 600 lbs 151.00; 675-690 lbs 152.49; 745 lbs 151.00; 750-780 lbs 144.90; 800 lbs 145.35.

Oklahoma 7100. 98 pct over 600 lbs. 44 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 675 lbs 163.00; 800-830 lbs 152.85; 850-860 lbs 146.79; Feb 750 lbs 153.04; Mar 800 lbs 155.70. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 850 lbs 145.04. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 410 lbs 190.00; 700-745 lbs 146.77; 750-800 lbs 145.67; 800-825 lbs 143.96; Apr 700 lbs 149.92; July 700 lbs 147.50.

New Mexico 2400. 81 pct over 600 lbs. 22 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700 lbs 159.00; 750 lbs 158.50; 800 lbs 157.52. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 600-625 lbs 176.53; 625 lbs 158.50 Mex; 800-825 lbs 149.58; 900 lbs 149.10. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700 lbs 149.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 550 lbs 162.10; 600 lbs 146.00 Mex; 750 lbs 149.76; 800 lbs 145.10.

Kansas 5300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 56 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 156.36; 800-840 lbs 153.61; 875 lbs 146.50; Del Current 800 lbs 153.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 680 lbs 166.00; 700-725 lbs 165.04; 750-760 lbs 163.33; 825 lbs 157.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs 147.56; 750-775 lbs 145.62; Mar 725 lbs 140.92; Apr 700 lbs 148.80. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 620 lbs 155.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — January 29
National feeder cattle receipts: 237,100

Feeder cattle Jan. 22 ended the week on a high note as many auctions throughout the trade area closed mostly $5-10 higher as the cattle futures had sharp gains to end last week. These gains carried into this week with most markets ranging from $3-10 higher on feeder cattle and calves with spots $12-15 higher. Direct trade was mostly $1-5 higher. Many major salebarns are seeing heavy receipts with many impressive sales of hardened winter feeders around the circuit. Valentine, NE on Jan. 28 sold over 4000 head with near 265 head of 600-650 lb steers averaging 619 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $190.67 and 150 head of fancy steers averaging 734 lbs dropped the gavel at $180. Overall demand remains was very good this week with many lightweight calves under 500 lbs seeing some of the most impressive gains. Demand for these lightweight stockers gets better as more grass grazers enter the market each week with the understanding that supplies will be dwindling down by spring. Many Midwestern farmer-feeders were also active this week buying feeder cattle throughout the Northern Plains and Midwest as some of the heavier weight feeders weighing from 500-700 lbs which the supply is more readily available saw very good demand. With a higher feeder market this week, should have the tendency to hopefully keep feeders moving if this market can hold together as we continue to see huge swings up and down each week. All eyes still seem focused on the futures with support this week coming from late last week’s higher fed cattle trade and follow through buying. Feedlots also seem a little more optimistic about selling fed cattle at higher prices. Live cattle futures on Jan. 27 had triple-digit gains and this was without any help from other markets as the Stock Market sold off on Jan. 28. The Stock Market for the most part has tried to pull a comeback this week as volatile markets seems to be something we are going to live with for now. Boxed-beef prices continue to lose ground this week, with some fears of how much ground will the cut-out value give back after a large run up since Christmas? The east coast has had a record snowfall dumped on them with a near shutdown of several major areas with major populations; affecting grocery shopping and restaurant traffic for a number of days. Choice boxed-beef has lost over $15 the last thirteen sessions with Jan. 29’s Choice cut-out closing $1.36 lower at $218.76 compared to last Jan. 29 close at $224.83. USDA Cattle Inventory Report was released Friday afternoon showing expected expansion of the beef herd. All cattle and calves as of January 1, 2016 totaled 92 million head. This was 3 percent higher than year ago totals. All cows and heifers that have calved at 39.6 million head which was 3 percent higher than last year. The 2015 calf crop was 2 percent higher than last year at 34.3 million head. US cattle on feed totaled 13.2 million head; 1 percent higher than last year. Auction volume included 63 percent over 600 lbs and 39 percent heifers.

Texas 5600. 64 pct over 600 lbs. 48 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (385) 229.78; 400-450 lbs (432) 214.00; 450-500 lbs (470) 208.09; 500-550 lbs (523) 190.27; 550-600 lbs (567) 181.28; 600-650 lbs (630) 172.41; 650-700 lbs (674) 168.84; 700-750 lbs (740) 160.22; 750-800 lbs (766) 159.55; 800-850 lbs (813) 154.87; 850-900 lbs (867) 151.08; 900-950 lbs (905) 145.29; 950-1000 lbs (957) 140.00; few loads 1005 lbs 139.00. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (536) 180.14; 550-600 lbs (571) 173.66; 600-650 lbs (616) 166.53; 650-700 lbs (656) 166.76; 750-800 lbs (755) 156.22; 800-850 lbs (829) 153.46. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (424) 193.06; 450-500 lbs (480) 178.68; 500-550 lbs (523) 169.56; 550-600 lbs (582) 162.70; 600-650 lbs (615) 155.53; 650-700 lbs (675) 151.22; 700-750 lbs (726) 148.94; 750-800 lbs (776) 143.74; 800-850 lbs (823) 141.57; 900-950 lbs (925) 129.25. Medium and Large 12 400-450 lbs (429) 180.56; 450-500 lbs (472) 174.40; 500-550 lbs (536) 162.11; 550-600 lbs (563) 156.32; 600-650 lbs (618) 153.65; 700-750 lbs (731) 138.93; 800-850 lbs (828) 143.29.

Oklahoma 24,700. 67 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 247.99; 350-400 lbs (376) 235.26; 400-450 lbs (424) 227.60; 450-500 lbs (478) 213.24; 500-550 lbs (528) 196.87; 550-600 lbs (568) 186.77; 600-650 lbs (621) 175.14; 650-700 lbs (672) 167.14; 700-750 lbs (722) 161.33; 750-800 lbs (771) 156.02; 800-850 lbs (828) 150.73; 850-900 lbs (873) 149.09; 900-950 lbs (926) 146.65; 950-1000 lbs (979) 141.86; 1050-1200 lbs (1071) 135.13. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (388) 219.85; 400-450 lbs (429) 211.39; 450-500 lbs (476) 200.99; 500-550 lbs (529) 188.11; 550-600 lbs (573) 178.90; 600-650 lbs (628) 166.00; 650-700 lbs (683) 157.89; 700-750 lbs (727) 155.37; 750-800 lbs (778) 149.92; 800-850 lbs (827) 148.57; 850-900 lbs (866) 143.78; 900-950 lbs (904) 145.09; 950-1000 lbs (983) 135.51. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 209.08; 350-400 lbs (383) 200.78; 400-450 lbs (425) 194.32; 450-500 lbs (471) 184.26; 500-550 lbs (525) 167.89; 550-600 lbs (573) 161.66; 600-650 lbs (628) 156.73; 650-700 lbs (674) 152.45; 700-750 lbs (723) 150.27; 750-800 lbs (774) 144.89; 800-850 lbs (820) 143.04; 850-900 lbs (871) 143.46; 900-950 lbs (910) 139.13. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (318) 196.73; 350-400 lbs (382) 187.13; 400-450 lbs (427) 185.91; 450-500 lbs (481) 173.08; 500-550 lbs (533) 163.44; 550-600 lbs (583) 153.94; 600-650 lbs (626) 145.04; 650-700 lbs (675) 142.78; 700-750 lbs (730) 139.28; 850-900 lbs (863) 132.66.

New Mexico 3700. 45 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 (428) 212.59; 450-500 (469) 198.04; 500-550 (522) 186.55; 550-600 (571) 182.26; 600-650 (613) 172.79; 650-700 (684) 165.22; 700-750 (727) 160.48; 850-900 (863) 150.06. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 (375) 230.56; 400-450 (433) 215.08; 450-500 (475) 208.47; 500-550 (521) 191.46; 550-600 (575) 170.54; 600-650 (618) 165.93; 650-700 (667) 159.90; 700-750 (723) 158.54; 750800 (778) 149.46. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 (326) 212.38; 400-450 (426) 183.56; 450-500 (482) 165.36; 500-550 (521) 169.20; 550-600 (580) 158.59; 600-650 (632) 157.37; 650-700 (675) 153.54; 700-750 (724) 147.10. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 (378) 195.29; 400-450 (422) 184.01; 450-500 (481) 178.30; 500-550 (531) 161.32; 550-600 (578) 158.86; 650-700 (680) 141.11; 700-750 (720) 136.36.

Kansas 13,100. 88 pct over 600 lbs. 31 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (427) 216.70; 450-500 lbs (468) 219.84; 500-550 lbs (534) 200.07; 550-600 lbs (575) 189.81; 600-650 lbs (625) 180.04; 650-700 lbs (664) 171.69; 700-750 lbs (725) 161.13; 750-800 lbs (769) 157.42; 800-850 lbs (827) 152.90;850-900 lbs (868) 150.65; 900-950 lbs (916) 147.74; 950-1000 lbs (964) 143.23; 1000-1050 lbs (1014) 143.44. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (489) 212.48; 500-550 lbs (542) 192.33; 550-600 lbs (593) 187.72; 600-650 lbs (631) 177.95; 650-700 lbs (683) 163.35; 700-750 lbs (727) 154.24; 750-800 lbs (788) 149.87; 800-850 lbs (822) 148.26; 850-900 lbs (881) 142.83; 900-950 lbs (924) 140.46. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (430) 184.41; 450-500 lbs (474) 186.30; 500-550 lbs (538) 173.74; 550-600 lbs (579) 163.96; 600-650 lbs (625) 155.69; 650-700 lbs (674) 150.24; 700-750 lbs (729) 146.94; 750-800 lbs (762) 147.12; 800-850 lbs (816) 144.09; 850-900 lbs (870) 142.61. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (424) 175.83; 500-550 lbs (537) 161.67; 550-600 lbs (584) 157.29; 650-700 lbs (687) 142.23; 750-800 lbs (779) 140.87; 800-850 lbs (829) 140.15.

Missouri 32,600. 49 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 230.05; 350-400 lbs (372) 220.75; 400-450 lbs (426) 217.36; 450-500 lbs (478) 207.57; 500-550 lbs (523) 201.71; 550-600 lbs (573) 188.98; 600-650 lbs (625) 175.43; 650-700 lbs (675) 167.77; 700-750 lbs (723) 162.61; 750-800 lbs (771) 156.35; 800-850 lbs (827) 152.25; 850-900 lbs (877) 151.39; 900-950 lbs (924) 140.37; 950-1000 lbs (975) 139.29. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (380) 209.36; 400-450 lbs (424) 202.80; 450-500 lbs (476) 193.85; 500-550 lbs (528) 188.61; 550-600 lbs (576) 178.10; 600-650 lbs (629) 170.14; 650-700 lbs (676) 163.04; 700-750 lbs (719) 157.09; 750-800 lbs (774) 148.40; 800-850 lbs (828) 145.75; 850-900 lbs (889) 146.28; 900-950 lbs (930) 144.45. Holsteins: Large 3 500-550 lbs (518) 131.56; 700-750 lbs (726) 104.95. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 192.76; 350-400 lbs (378) 185.17; 400-450 lbs (427) 179.60; 450-500 lbs (475) 172.82; 500-550 lbs (524) 164.92; 550-600 lbs (575) 158.15; 600-650 lbs (624) 155.62; 650-700 lbs (672) 148.03; 700-750 lbs (720) 143.51; 750-800 lbs (777) 142.41; 800-850 lbs (813) 138.58; 850-900 lbs (872) 138.50; pkg 930 lbs 134.00. Medium and Large 12 300-350 lbs (340) 194.27; 350-400 lbs (376) 175.84; 400-450 lbs (428) 174.06; 450-500 lbs (477) 164.77; 500-550 lbs (528) 158.55; 550-600 lbs (571) 156.57; 600-650 lbs (627) 150.25; 650-700 lbs (669) 142.62; 700-750 lbs (727) 139.43; 750-800 lbs (765) 132.04; 800-850 lbs (821) 129.70.

Arkansas 4200. 32 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 233.84; 350-400 lbs (371) 218.75; 400-450 lbs (422) 206.53; 450-500 lbs (473) 199.36; 500-550 lbs (518) 191.10; 550-600 lbs (573) 176.65; 600-650 lbs (622) 168.84; 650-700 lbs (668) 161.92. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 196.88; 350-400 lbs (374) 190.32; 400-450 lbs (420) 183.12; 450-500 lbs (470) 176.33; 500-550 lbs (523) 163.64; 550-600 lbs (576) 155.13; 600-650 lbs (627) 151.48.

 

 

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Friday, February 5, 2016 10:29 AM