Surface Transportation Board “Ups The Ante” For Rail

By Mary Kennedy
DTN Cash Grains Analyst

Omaha (DTN) – Beginning Oct. 22, all Class I railroads will be required to publicly file weekly data reports regarding service performance “to promote industry-wide transparency, accountability, and improved service,” the Surface Transportation Board announced on Oct. 8.

The order follows the board’s recent public hearings regarding rail service issues, at which many rail shippers expressed concerns about the lack of publicly available rail service metrics and requested access to certain performance data from the railroads to help them better understand the scope, magnitude, and impact of the current service problems. The data collected pursuant to this order will give the board and interested parties a better real-time understanding of the current rail service issues.” Here is the link to the STB announcement: http://goo.gl/7vW8SP

The announcement was welcomed by those in the industry who have been asking for more transparency and overall communication from the railroads. North Dakota Farmers Union President Mark Watne issued a statement saying, “This decision is a good first step toward addressing and understanding the severity of our rail service problems in the state. Greater transparency will no doubt lead to a more productive dialogue between shippers, railroads and farmers ... and give all the stakeholders a better understanding of what each other faces. It may also help us pinpoint, and maybe even avoid, future bottlenecks in our rail system with all the real-time data exposed.”

The National Grain and Feed Association also commended the STB for requiring railroads to expand weekly public reporting of rail service performance,’’ including for the first time for nonagricultural products and to extend the reporting requirement to all Class I railroads. The new STB order also expands the scope and granularity of service metrics that all Class I railroads now will be required to report, and applies many of the reporting requirements to encompass coal, crude oil, ethanol, automotive, intermodal and manifest traffic.’’

The NGFA added, “Importantly, the STB’s order also requires collaborative reporting of detailed rail service metrics specific to the congestion at the Chicago terminal hub by the six Class I carriers operating at the Chicago gateway – BNSF, Union Pacific, CSXT, Norfolk Southern, Canadian Pacific and Canadian National.’’

The Association of American Railroads (AAR) issued a statement from CEO Edward R. Hamberger on Oct. 8 after the release of new STB requirements: “We are examining the STB decision. Since 1999, railroads have on a weekly basis voluntarily provided the STB and the public with railroad performance measures on terminal dwell time, velocity and cars online. It is unclear how the increased reporting requirements in today’s order will in any way lead to improved service.

“Railroads are investing and hiring at an accelerated pace to provide the capacity needed to meet growing demand as traffic continues to rebound to pre-recession levels, continued Hamberger. “Hiring and training people, and building infrastructure take time. Railroads will continue to work with their customers to meet the demand to move more freight as America’s economy continues to grow.”

CALL FOR GREATER TRANSPARENCY
Before STB issued its order on Oct. 8, shippers, industry leaders and state government figures at a recent STB hearing in Fargo, N.D., stressed the need to assess the reality of car backlogs and slow service in the U.S.

Bob Zelenka, executive director of Minnesota Grain and Feed, asked the STB at the Sept. 4 meeting to continue requiring the BNSF and Canadian Pacific Railroad to provide greater transparency through service metrics.

The National Corn Growers echoed that request, “NCGA is worried about the railroads’ abilities to provide timely and efficient service during the upcoming fall harvest and heavy shipping period. As a result, we urge the board to continue to carefully monitor BNSF’s and CP’s grain service through the fall harvest and take additional actions, if needed.”

Eric Broten from Dazey, N.D., testifying on behalf of the American Soybean Association, said, “We support the request made by the ASA for the STB to require railroads to submit metrics showing past dues, average days late, turnaround times, etc. for agricultural customers vs. crude oil customers and other customers.

Oil train service was the one thing most people who testified at the 9 1/2-hour hearing on Sept. 4 wanted to know about. What was the level of service for oil trains, and were oil cars ever late like the backlog of grain cars? While the railroads present never answered that question, it’s not difficult to figure out the answer if you live or travel in the northern part of North Dakota and Minnesota because nearly 75% of the time, long trains of oil cars are all you see.

On July 26, the Minneapolis Star Tribune newspaper said, “Fifty oil trains, each loaded with more than 1 million gallons of North Dakota crude oil, pass through Minnesota each week, and almost all of them go through the Twin Cities, according to the first detailed reports on the state’s crude-by-rail traffic obtained by the Star Tribune. “The reports, submitted to state officials by railroads and stamped ‘confidential,’ say that oil trains can be more than 100 tank cars long as they pass through 39 of the state’s 87 counties,” reported the Star Tribune. “The greatest concentration is on the BNSF Railway main line between Moorhead and the Twin Cities. Canadian Pacific, another railroad serving North Dakota’s Bakken region, sends far fewer oil trains through the state, the data show.”

That may change in the near future on the CP. At a recent meeting of CP investors, CEO Hunter Harrison’s presentation said that, energy products are expected to buoy revenue and the CP may carry as many as 200,000 carloads of crude oil in 2015, which is more than double what the railroad moved in 2013.

BNSF AND CP SERVICE UPDATES
In his weekly podcast, John Miller, Ag VP for BNSF said, “We have completed forming all shuttles for fall harvest and they are in use in the market place. We are flowing soybeans to the PNW to meet vessel demand and turn times have rebounded back over 2.5 TPM in that area.’’ “With shuttles fully built and operational, general fleet car can be directed toward single and unit car orders,” added Miller. “We expect past dues to stabilize as car supplies recover to meet demand.” Miller said that current delays are a result of harvest demand and noted that overall volumes so far this harvest exceed volumes seen last year at this time in North and South Dakota. Here is the link to the weekly service update to the STB: http://goo.gl/VOQaSZ

In their update to the STB for the week of Oct. 10, the CP stated, “We continue to experience extended dwell within the grain supply chain. This includes origins in North Dakota for wheat shipments east, rail interchange locations and destination unloading at mills and export terminals. We are working with the shippers, facilities and other railroads involved to improve the situation, both at origin and destination. Overall rail capacity is reduced when cars sit idle. This is because any delay in the supply chain results in fewer trains or cars in the cycle.” Here is a link to the complete update by the CP to the STB: http://goo.gl/a4ApKj.

Tight Margins Force Some Farmers To Reconsider Biotech Seed

By Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

McLean, Ill. (DTN) – As Matt Hughes pulled large, well-formed ears from his cornfield near McLean, Ill., he conceded that his Bt hybrids performed well this year. Nearly every kernel was free from insect damage and yields could set some farm records.

So why is this central Illinois farmer considering abandoning corn containing traits in favor of conventional, non-genetically engineered (GE) hybrids next year? “The problem is we’ve seen a 50% decline in our commodity prices recently,” Hughes explained to DTN. “Last year, our margins suffered dramatically, and we’re below cost of production today even with increased yields.’’

With cash prices for corn and soybeans hovering around $3 and $9 respectively, stubbornly high seed prices have become a burden for many Midwestern producers. In this market, biotech seed could be a low-hanging fruit when it comes to cutting input costs for 2015, farmers and experts told DTN.

STICKY SEED PRICES
“Seed companies are accustomed to selling into a high-profit environment,” explained Robert Hill, at economist and owner of the market research and consulting company Caledonia Solutions. “Now the economic picture has changed dramatically for the major Midwest crops, and there is good reason to question seed pricing strategies,” he told DTN in an email.

In Illinois, Hughes said he has seen other agricultural inputs like fertilizer begin to adjust to the lower commodity prices. But high-tech seed, which often represents an enormous investment for agricultural companies, tends to be “sticky downward,” Hill noted. Recently, even land rents, another historically slow-to-react input, have shown signs of easing. “Rents are coming down. Will seed prices follow?” Hill wondered.

DOING WITHOUT
Insect and weed developments have changed the value of some biotech seed traits, both farmers and experts noted. “Because of herbicide resistance and rootworm resistance, we’re getting back to the crop management tactics that we used to use in the mid-’80s – pre-emergence herbicides, scouting, and targeted soil insecticides,” University of Minnesota IPM specialist Bruce Potter pointed out. Bt-corn hybrids and soybeans with biotech traits like Roundup Ready “have a lot of convenience priced into them,” Hughes said. “I’m not going to operate at a loss just for convenience.’’

INSECT ISSUES
Ditching Bt-traits will mean Hughes has to return to a full rate of planting-time soil insecticides, which are readily available and cheaper. “The cost of seed has outpaced the cost of insecticides,” he pointed out. Moreover, Hughes’ planting equipment is already outfitted to apply the insecticides when needed. He has used soil insecticide in addition to traits for years to control secondary pests like white grubs and wireworms.

Over in northwestern Missouri, Bob Birdsell has been growing all non-GE corn and soybeans for six years an his corn, soybean, wheat, and cow-calf operation. The Stanberry, Mo., farmer estimates that using non-Bt corn hybrids saves him 50% or more on seed costs. His treated, non-GE corn seed ranges from $158 per bag to $175 per bag. Along with a $12-per-acre soil insecticide application, crop rotation, and diligent scouting, his insect problems are under control, he added.

In some fields where growers have seen failure of some Bt-traits, high rootworm populations could overwhelm a soil insecticide and still cause lodging and yield loss, Potter cautioned. Treating adult rootworm beetles with insecticide is also a difficult proposition, because beetles emerge over a long period of time.

Planting non-GE corn seed will work only if growers are well educated on their rootworm populations, Potter explained. “Scouting will be more important for the people that do this,” he told DTN. “The risk will vary by geography.’’ European corn borer is a pest that will also need monitoring – Bt traits have practically eliminated it as a threat.

WEED CONTROL
Thanks to glyphosate-resistant waterhemp populations, switching to soybeans and corn with no biotech traits like Roundup Ready won’t require much of an adjustment on his operation, Hughes pointed out. “We’re already almost back to our old conventional herbicide program here,’’ he said of his aggressive use of pre-emergence and residual herbicides.

In Missouri, Birdsell estimates that his $25 bags of untreated, non-traited soybean seed cost less than half of a standard-traited bag of seed. He uses pre-emergence herbicide products with multiple modes of action to keep local populations of glyphosate-resistant giant ragweed and waterhemp at bay, he added.

For farmers who are considering generic seed, many weed control options do exist, but they won’t necessarily be cheap, University of Missouri weed scientist Kevin Bradley noted. “Certainly a weed control program can be implemented in corn or soybeans without the use of glyphosate and the RR technology,” he told DTN in an email. “However, in conventional soybeans, the post emergence options are fewer and not anywhere as close to as flexible and “easy” as Roundup. We should also remember that the price of Roundup itself (not the trait but just what you get in the jug) is very, very low.

QUALITY AND END-USE QUESTIONS
Hughes pointed to an increasing number of non-GE varieties available from seed companies as evidence of a shift in priorities. “It’s driven by consumer demand,” Hughes said. “If consumers want non-GMO and are willing to pay for it, we have to react to that.”

Both he and Birdsell said they believe the quality of the germplasm in non-GE seed is catching up to biotech seed. Birdsell even plants side-by-side test plots to ensure he isn’t “leaving money on the table.” “In our area, in a corn and bean rotation, I think there’s only ever been about one year in 10 that it has paid to use stacked hybrids,” he said.

For now, Birdsell sends his non-GE corn into the commercial stream. He sells his soybeans to a small company that offers premiums that range from $0.60 to $2 per bushel, and he is always an the lookout for a similar non-GE corn markets.

Hughes already grows some non-GE soybeans for seed companies and said he will explore end-use options for more non-GE corn and soybean seed this fall. In the past, he has taken advantage of high-value varieties such as white corn, and his operation is equipped to handle the segregation and stewardship that comes with specialty crops, he added. “One of the first things we’ll look at going back to is extra value markets,” he said. “There are a few options to play with there and non-GMO is the fastest-growing market out there.”

Oklahoma Wheat Producers Should Check For Fall Armyworms Now

By Donald Stotts

Stillwater, Okla. – Oklahoma State University’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources is recommending state wheat producers examine their pastures for the presence of fall armyworms. “I checked a field of wheat this past weekend that exhibited significant damage from fall armyworms and found an average of six to seven fall armyworms per square foot,” said Tom Royer, OSU Cooperative Extension Integrated Pest Management coordinator.

Producers should scout for fall armyworms by examining plants in five or more locations in the field. The presence of “window paned” leaves – where the green tissue has been scraped off, leaving a clear membrane – or chewed leaves is a tipoff a fall armyworm problem may exist.

Fall armyworms are most active in the morning or late afternoon. Take care to count all sizes of larvae. Examine plants along the field margin as well as in the interior because fall armyworms sometimes move in from road ditches and weedy areas. “The caterpillars were widely distributed in the field I checked, suggesting they were the result of a large egg-lay from a recent adult moth flight,” Royer said. “The suggested treatment threshold is two to three larvae per linear foot of row in wheat with active feeding.”

For control suggestions, consult the newly updated OSU Extension Fact Sheet CR-7194, “Management of Insect and Mite Pests of Small Grains,” available online at http://osufacts.okstate.edu and through all OSU Cooperative Extension county offices, usually listed in telephone directories under “County Government.”

Oklahoma will not get relief from fall armyworms until the first killing frost of the year, since they do not overwinter in the state.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 21,800

Texas 8200. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 23 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 640 lbs 255.00; 675 lbs 256.50; 725 lbs 245.00; 750 lbs 239.50; 800 lbs 235.50; Nov 750 lbs 240.40; Jan 750 lbs 234.10; Feb 750 lbs 232.50; Mar 750 lbs 232.00; 800 lbs 229.00; Del Current 750-775 lbs 240.38; 800-835 lbs 234.84; 850 lbs 235.00; Dec 700 lbs 235.35. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 665 lbs 251.12; 725-740 lbs 242.68; 775 lbs 232.18; 825 lbs 226.90; Nov 715 lbs 247.00; 825 lbs 236.72; Jan 900 lbs 211.25; Del Current 730 lbs 243.00; 825 lbs 229.00; 850 lbs 230.00; Oct-Nov 725 lbs 248.00; Nov 775 lbs 242.55; Dec 775 lbs 242.75. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-740 lbs 224.94; Nov 700 lbs 233.40; Dec 650 lbs 230.34; Jan 700 lbs 227.10; Del Dec 700 lbs 229.65; Jan 700 lbs 228.15.

Oklahoma 3300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 30 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-785 lbs 241.89; 800-835 lbs 234.55; 850 lbs 232.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 680 lbs 245.98; Nov 850 lbs 217.50; Del Current 705-745 lbs 242.30; 840 lbs 228.00. Medium and Large 2 FOB Current 745 lbs 222.23 Mexican Origin; 725 lbs 240.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Dec 700 lbs 227.81; Jan 700 lbs 225.15.

New Mexico 1200. 100 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 750 lbs 238.00; 800-825 lbs 233.38. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 825 lbs 228.00; Nov 760 lbs 236.26.

Kansas 3700. 96 pct 600 over lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 249.91; 750 lbs 244.16; 800-825 lbs 237.94; 850 lbs 235.00; Jan 850 lbs 228.33; Del Current 775 lbs 238.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 925 lbs 210.00; Del Current 665 lbs 251.00; 775 lbs 238.00; Nov 850 lbs 222.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs 233.50; 750-785 lbs 227.27; Del Nov 575 lbs 256.53. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725 lbs 228.26.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — October 10
National feeder cattle receipts: 231,600

Feeder and stocker cattle markets continued to show considerable strength for the start of October which is annually the month with the most pressure from spring-born calf sales. This week yearlings sold mostly $3-7 higher with instances $10 higher. While arrivals of mostly new crop calves sold $5-10 higher with spots as much as $15 higher on the lighter weight calves under 500 lbs. Featherweight calves in many areas under 400 lbs easily saw the full advance with a string of 142 head of value added (NHTC) steer calves weighing 368 lbs sold for $419.50 at the Hub City Livestock Market in Aberdeen, SD on Wednesday. Both calf and yearling markets noted the full advance on steers, while heifer sales (mostly calves) represented the lower ends of this week’s advance. The feeder cattle market keeps moving along at a very brisk pace. Anyone who has been at the auctions for any extended period will tell you feeders are too high however feeder cattle keep advancing at such a rapid pace that the thought of a market top is only short lived and replaced with a new one the next day or certainly the next week. Order buyers continue to flex their muscle in pursuing all classes of feeder cattle in the face of historical high prices. Stocker and feeder calf buyers are a long way from filling their needs as Corn Belt cattlemen have huge mounds of silage, hay and corn ready to feed. This has livestock producers on the offensive while the grain producer is just the opposite; on the defensive. Live Cattle and Feeder Cattle Futures continue to show good strength for the week, with most Feeder Cattle contracts continue to make all-time highs. Then on Thursday the Stock Market had its worst day of the year falling 334 points lower on slowing global economies as Live and Feeder cattle futures then fell off their triple-digit gains to close lower. Stay tuned this could be a bumpy ride as cattle futures remain very volatile with sharp losses posted on Friday to end the week. Last Friday packers reentered the market to cover needs as fat cattle traded at mostly $162 live which was $3-4 higher than the previous week. On Thursday afternoon fat cattle in Kansas and Nebraska traded $2-3 higher from $163-164, with dressed sales $5-6 higher from $257-258 and live sales in Nebraska on Friday trading up to $165. Boxed beef found its footing on Monday to start the week gaining $3 and continued to climb higher over the next five sessions gaining near $9 dollars with Choice closing Friday at $247.67. Corn futures so far this week have made a modest recovery mostly due to weather conditions as fall rains have slowed harvest across the Corn Belt and grain traders positioning themselves ahead of Friday’s USDA Supply and Demand Report that estimated the largest average yield of 174.2 bushels per acre. Any way you look at it corn supplies are going to be very abundant. This week’s auction volume included 40 percent over 600 lbs and 38 percent heifers.

Texas 6200. 67 pct over 600 lbs. 33 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (359) 332.36; 400-450 lbs (419) 303.64; 450-500 lbs (471) 301.39; 500-550 lbs (526) 269.62; 550-600 lbs (580) 254.04; 600-650 lbs (623) 251.94; 650-700 lbs (682) 247.26; 700-750 lbs (718) 225.65; 750-800 lbs (772) 224.56; 800-850 lbs (837) 238.15. Medium and Large 1-2 pkg 460 lbs 296.50; 500-550 lbs (525) 249.13; 550-600 lbs (579) 249.65; 600-650 lbs (623) 230.05; 650-700 lbs (680) 250.90; 700-750 lbs (729) 228.86; 750-800 lbs (771) 226.18; 800-850 lbs (819) 224.39. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (386) 310.38; 400-450 lbs (432) 275.55; 450-500 lbs (470) 262.15; 500-550 lbs (523) 252.07; 550-600 lbs (571) 234.77; 600-650 lbs (621) 235.96; 650-700 lbs (677) 225.39; 700-750 lbs (717) 223.07; 750-800 lbs (757) 228.39; half load 965 lbs 204.00. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (472) 253.30; 500-550 lbs (526) 226.78; 550-600 lbs (562) 220.16; 600-650 lbs (629) 217.68; 650-700 lbs (662) 210.75; 700-750 lbs (718) 206.57; 750-800 lbs (775) 195.12.

Oklahoma 31,500. 55 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 370.77; 350-400 lbs (366) 342.48; 400-450 lbs (420) 310.96; 450-500 lbs (477) 293.43; 500-550 lbs (528) 280.73; 550-600 lbs (570) 267.12; 600-650 lbs (623) 254.95; 650-700 lbs (666) 253.41; 700-750 lbs (722) 253.13; 750-800 lbs (766) 244.71; 800-850 lbs (815) 238.87; 850-900 lbs (870) 227.68; 900-950 lbs (921) 221.87; 950-1000 lbs (975) 210.57; 1000-1050 lbs (1006) 199.24. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (332) 328.19; 350-400 lbs (376) 322.82; 400-450 lbs (427) 292.71; 450-500 lbs (479) 275.60; 500-550 lbs (524) 255.95; 550-600 lbs (577) 249.71; 600-650 lbs (627) 243.34; 650-700 lbs (674) 247.96; 700-750 lbs (737) 240.58; 750-800 lbs (773) 230.11; 800-850 lbs (828) 220.21; 850-900 lbs (891) 222.81; 900-950 lbs (937) 210.19. Holsteins: Large 3 600-650 lbs (623) 177.50; 850-900 lbs (857) 181.75. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 308.26; 350-400 lbs (367) 293.00; 400-450 lbs (428) 280.07; 450-500 lbs (476) 262.41; 500-550 lbs (522) 249.39; 550-600 lbs (576) 241.36; 600-650 lbs (629) 240.74; 650-700 lbs (675) 235.37; 700-750 lbs (721) 234.36; 750-800 lbs (770) 227.19; 800-850 lbs (810) 214.07; 850-900 lbs (869) 213.90; 900-950 lbs (931) 195.88. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (325) 285.28; 350-400 lbs (388) 265.08; 400-450 lbs (428) 265.54; 450-500 lbs (478) 249.66; 500-550 lbs (525) 236.69; 550-600 lbs (573) 227.73; 600-650 lbs (626) 222.35; 650-700 lbs (666) 233.00; 700-750 lbs (740) 220.42; 750-800 lbs (767) 221.56; 800-850 lbs (833) 212.49.

New Mexico 4600. 33 pct over 60 lbs. 33 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (334) 344.51; 350-400 lbs (377) 325.57; 400-450 lbs (425) 315.97; 450-500 lbs (474) 294.64; 500-550 lbs (525) 272.20; 550-600 lbs (583) 254.11; 600-650 lbs (616) 243.45; 650-700 lbs (671) 230.17; 700-750 lbs (734) 227.29; 750-800 lbs (787) 211.68; 800-850 lbs (810) 220.47. Medium and Large 12 400-450 lbs (429) 294.34; 450-500 lbs (481) 271.22; 500-550 lbs (523) 259.34; 550-600 lbs (569) 241.48; 600-650 lbs (628) 236.43; 650-700 lbs (677) 220.79; 700-750 lbs (729) 228.30. Heifers Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (336) 316.90; 350-400 lbs (372) 302.75; 400-450 lbs (419) 287.47; 450-500 lbs (476) 261.21; 500-550 lbs (533) 240.67; 550-600 lbs (574) 234.62; 600-650 lbs (626) 217.15; 650-700 lbs (686) 221.63. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (384) 300.17; 400-450 lbs (436) 269.66; 450-500 lbs (475) 242.52.

Kansas 7800. 83 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (450) 318.37; 500-550 lbs (524) 303.73; 550-600 lbs (560) 277.28; 600-650 lbs (612) 287.18; 650-700 lbs (673) 261.18; 700-750 lbs (724) 253.30; 750-800 lbs (768) 247.11; 800-850 lbs (817) 238.19; 850-900 lbs (869) 231.92; 900-950 lbs (908) 224.06. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (435) 306.12; 500-550 lbs (527) 279.74; 550-600 lbs (584) 271.89; 600-650 lbs (633) 255.49; 650-700 lbs (674) 247.91; 700-750 lbs (735) 241.05; 750-800 lbs (786) 236.69; 800-850 lbs (841) 234.12; 850-900 lbs (883) 223.20; 900-950 lbs (917) 218.10; load 950 lbs 210.10. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 470 lbs 300.00; 500-550 lbs (528) 286.76; 550-600 lbs (557) 285.41; 600-650 lbs (625) 238.90; 700-750 lbs (718) 236.34; 750-800 lbs (774) 225.11; 800-850 lbs (819) 221.12; 850-900 lbs (880) 210.65. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (424) 300.48; 450-500 lbs (458) 272.52; 500-550 lbs (525) 254.25; 550-600 lbs (576) 248.27; 600-650 lbs (632) 234.42; 650-700 lbs (680) 233.26; 700-750 lbs (716) 228.48; 750-800 lbs (786) 225.72; 800-850 lbs (833) 217.24.

Missouri 26,600. 40 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (269) 350.44; 300-350 lbs (326) 348.24; 350-400 lbs (374) 324.98; 400-450 lbs (428) 315.20; 450-500 lbs (473) 296.90; 500-550 lbs (522) 282.52; 550-600 lbs (576) 266.59; 600-650 lbs (620) 261.53; 650-700 lbs (672) 252.01; 700-750 lbs (723) 249.00; 750-800 lbs (780) 234.57; 800-850 lbs (814) 233.01; 850-900 lbs (878) 225.53; 900-950 lbs (928) 213.87; 1000-1050 lbs (1003) 210.66. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (333) 313.03; 350-400 lbs (377) 297.94; 400-450 lbs (427) 286.98; 450-500 lbs (477) 269.28; 500-550 lbs (529) 260.48; 550-600 lbs (569) 253.41; 600-650 lbs (625) 243.31; 650-700 lbs (674) 233.99; 700-750 lbs (723) 224.31; 750-800 lbs (780) 235.25. Holsteins: Large 3 350-400 lbs (368) 210.38; 400-450 lbs (426) 211.47; 450-500 lbs (484) 223.29; 500-550 lbs (521) 212.70; 550-600 lbs (576) 215.37; 600-650 lbs (623) 201.78; 650-700 lbs (676) 198.62; 700-750 lbs (730) 190.78; 750-800 lbs (773) 179.99; 800-850 lbs (836) 180.42; 850-900 lbs (875) 167.39. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 302.39; 350-400 lbs (375) 288.71; 400-450 lbs (423) 275.59; 450-500 lbs (470) 265.31; 500-550 lbs (522) 253.25; 550-600 lbs (571) 249.61; 600-650 lbs (619) 237.88; 650-700 lbs (675) 241.72; 700-750 lbs (724) 228.80; 750-800 lbs (766) 227.55. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (325) 271.86; 350-400 lbs (375) 267.04; 400-450 lbs (425) 251.50; 450-500 lbs (481) 247.06; 500-550 lbs (581) 247.06; 550-600 lbs (574) 232.79; 600-650 lbs (632) 241.35; 650-700 lbs (676) 230.51; 700-750 lbs (729) 232.85; 750-800 lbs (786) 217.57; 800-850 lbs (825) 217.99; load 875 lbs 205.00.

Arkansas 9300. 27 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 328.84; 350-400 lbs (376) 209.52; 400-450 lbs (424) 291.53; 450-500 lbs (474) 276.94; 500-550 lbs (525) 260.48; 550-600 lbs (572) 250.06; 600-650 lbs (622) 238.71; 650-700 lbs (671) 20.831. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 291.34; 350-400 lbs (373) 281.80; 400-450 lbs (423) 264.80; 450-500 lbs (469) 252.64; 500-550 lbs (524) 236.82; 550-600 lbs (570) 230.88; 600-650 lbs (621) 219.85; 650-700 lbs (676) 216.31.

 

 

logo
Friday, October 17, 2014 11:42 AM