Some Groups Tell Congress To Get Engaged; Others Tell Lawmakers To Stay Out

By Jerry Hagstrom
DTN Political Correspondent

Washington (DTN) – The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit denied a request from the American Meat Institute and other groups to rehear a motion for preliminary injunction blocking implementation of USDA’s final rule on country-of-origin labeling.

U.S. Cattlemen’s Association President Danni Beer said in an email, “USCA is pleased that once again the U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of COOL as the court stated today that the request for appeals of the most recent decisions in this case was denied.”

The American Meat Institute said in a statement that it was “disappointed.” “We continue to maintain that the country-of-origin rule harms livestock producers and the industry and provides little benefit to consumers,” AMI said. “The ban on commingling, which was the subject of this rehearing request, is a key component that made the 2013 rule even more onerous and burdensome than the previous rule, as was confirmed by the World Trade Organization’s recent report,” said AMI Interim President and CEO James H. Hodges. “The court’s refusal to rehear our motion will allow those harms to continue. We will evaluate our options.”

AMI noted that it had been joined in the original lawsuit filed in July 2013 by the American Association of Meat Processors, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, Canadian Pork Council, Confedaracion Nacional de Organizaciones Ganaderas, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, National Pork Producers Council, North American Meat Association and the Southwest Meat Association.

The court decision comes just a day after dozens of businesses and trade organizations wrote members of Congress stating they “are gravely concerned about the negative impact” COOL could have on the U.S. economy if Canada and Mexico opt to retaliate against U.S. goods.

The business groups wrote in their letter, “Given the negative impact on the U.S. manufacturing and agriculture economies, we respectfully submit that it would be intolerable for the United States to maintain, even briefly, a rule that has been deemed non-compliant by the WTO. With little potential for quick Congressional action after a WTO final adjudication, we request that Congress immediately authorize and direct the secretary of agriculture to rescind elements of COOL that have been determined to be non-compliant with international trade obligations by a final WTO adjudication. Such action by Congress would not undermine COOL to the extent COOL is consistent with international trade obligations nor would it weaken the U.S. defense of COOL in WTO litigation.”

USCA and the National Farmers Union also urged Congress to ignore that letter. Beer said the letter sent to Congress by opponents of COOL “should be ignored by those members on the Hill.’’ “The requests and stated timeline included in the letter regarding proposed retaliatory tariffs is simply off-base,” she said. “The protocol that must be followed to propose any tariffs against U.S. goods is a lengthy and precise process; the timeline stated in this letter is extremely optimistic in terms of what the WTO is capable of doing in such a short time frame. USCA remains committed to addressing the WTO ruling and any items of concern within the current COOL law, without congressional intervention.’’

National Farmers Union President Roger Johnson in a news release also urged Congress to ignore the letter because it “was organized by groups who have opposed COOL from day one and demonstrates that they understand they have lost the battle over this issue in the public arena. We urge Congress to ignore the overblown rhetoric of the letter and stay the course on COOL,” he said.

Johnson maintained that the WTO ruling said the implementation of the law remains unbalanced between consumer information and production costs and will need further changes. “The WTO has already ruled that the COOL law is compliant and this ruling shows that USDA’s current rule is one more step in the right direction, but way not have gone far enough in providing sufficient information to consumers,” he said. “Given the length of the WTO process and the variable outcomes that are possible for COOL, there is no reason for Congress to be stampeded into rash action based on fear mongering,” Johnson said.

Johnson noted that today’s decision was “the fourth time COOL has won in court.’’ “COOL became the law of the land because consumers want to know where their food comes from and ranchers and farmers are happy to provide that information,” Johnson said. “Congress understood this basic need and passed this common-sense law. We urge the multinational meat industry to drop the senseless litigation and allow the law to be enforced.’’

OSU To Rename Animal Science Arena In Memory Of Robert Totuse

By Donald Stotts

Stillwater, Okla. – Oklahoma State University’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources is renaming the OSU Animal Science Arena in memory of Robert. E. Totusek, who passed away in June. A 38-year faculty member of the university, “Dr. Tot” as he was affectionately called by faculty, staff, students and alumni coached great livestock teams and performed landmark beef cattle research. “As head of the OSU Department of Animal Science for 14 years, he was responsible for bringing together what had been three separate academic departments into one and led the unit to national renown as a producer of great scholars, industry leaders and outstanding purebred livestock,” said Clint Rusk, current head of the department.

In retirement, Totusek served as an ambassador and distinguished elder statesman for DASNR and the department. He was initiated into the Saddle and Sirloin Club at Louisville, Kentucky, in 1997, the most prestigious honor awarded to an animal agriculturist. “Dr. Totusek was responsible for record-setting donation campaigns, and became a driving force behind our Animal Science Alumni Association,” Rusk said. “One of his final leadership contributions was helping the ASAA establish five purebred-teaching center endowments.”

Totusek was instrumental – along with fellow OSU animal scientist Jarold Callahan – in the development and construction of the OSU Animal Science Arena, which was built in 1988 to replace the arena that was part of the old Animal Husbandry Building when it was torn down to make way for the OSU Noble Research Center.

The arena includes an almost 18,000 square foot floor with adjacent seating for 779 people. It also includes excellent animal working areas, office and kitchen space, a 1,675 square foot classroom and superb sound and lighting systems that make the facility a good choice for both teaching programs and special events. “A relentless thinker and proactive leader, Dr. Tot always knew how to guide others in the right direction, get you to consider a new perspective or challenge you to act,” said Mark Johnson, DASNR animal scientist who was the first holder of the OSU Robert “Bob” Totusek Endowed Chair in Animal Science.

In addition to the animal science arena, Totusek was instrumental in the construction of the OSU Animal Science Building and helped lay the groundwork for the development and construction of the OSU Food and Agricultural Products Center, the OSU Willard Sparks Beef Cattle Center and OSU Swine Teaching and Research Center.

Johnson, who serves as supervisor of the OSU Purebred Cattle Center, added Totusek had unwavering staying power and relevance to younger generations. “Dr. Tot had an uncanny knack for connecting to people of all ages, and was so extremely genuine and sincere that he made a lasting impression on the students he met, related to and remained in contact with throughout his life,” he said.

A Cowboy alumnus as well as a faculty member, Totusek earned his bachelor’s degree in animal science from then Oklahoma A&M College in 1949, after serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. A native Oklahoman, Totusek was born on a farm between Kingfisher and Garber to Aloise Karbusicky Totusek and Emil Totusek. Both of his parents’ families were immigrants from Czechoslovakia and were active in the local Czech communities.

Growing up during the Dust Bowl and Great Depression, he often recalled that his parents were poor but had a large garden and plenty of milk, meat and eggs, and delivered food to a number of Garber-area families in need every Saturday. “These early experiences impacted his life’s direction to become an advocate for the power of agriculture,” Johnson said. “He was a giant in the field of animal science and a visionary leader who was always searching for ways to improve the efficiency of meat animal production and to help the OSU Department of Animal Science.”

Four-State Cattle Conference Set Dec. 10 In Texarkana

Texarkana, Ark. – Helping livestock producers take advantage of historically high markets and rebuilding herds will be just two of the presentations at this year’s Four States Cattle Conference set Dec. 10 in Texarkana, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service county agent.

As in past years, the programming is designed specifically for the four-states region, which encompasses the contiguous corners of Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, said Dr. Brian Triplett, AgriLife Extension agent for agriculture and natural resources in Bowie County. “This is a conference that brings together speakers from four different universities in one location, where producers can gain valuable information in one day that they would have to travel to four states to get otherwise,” Triplet said. The conference will be held at the Four States Fairgrounds, 3700 East 50th St., Texarkana, Arkansas.

Registration is $30, whether paid in advance or at the door, and includes a barbecue brisket lunch. Though there’s no discount for early registration, Triplett said those preregistering by Dec. 1 will be entered into a drawing for a VetGun, a $250 device for delivering insecticide-filled gel capsules to control horn flies and lice on cattle.

To register, send your name, organization, mailing address, phone number and email along with a check or money order payable to “Clark County CES, 640 South 6th St., Suite B, Arkadelphia, AR 71923.”

Speakers will include: Dr. Temple Grandin, a designer of livestock handling facilities and an animal science professor at Colorado State University; Dr. Paul Beck, University of Arkansas beef cattle nutrition researcher; Dr. Brian Freking, Oklahoma State University regional livestock specialist; Dr. Ryon Walker, Louisiana State University assistant professor of beef cattle at the Hill Farm Research Station in Homer, Louisiana; Stan Bevers, AgriLife Extension economist, Vernon, Texas; Dr. Jason Banta, AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist; and Dr. Ron Strahan, Louisiana State University weed management specialist.

Early morning presentations will include “How to Reduce Stress on Cattle During Handling,” Grandin, and “Making Sense Out of Cattle Markets,” Bevers.

After a mid-morning break and refreshments, concurrent breakout sessions will include: “Heifer Selection and Development: Which Ones Will Be More Profitable?” Banta; “Managing Winter Annual Pastures for Stocker Cattle,” Beck; and “Weed Management in Southern Pastures,” Strahan.

Following lunch and a trade show, the concurrent sessions will be repeated and then followed at 2 p.m. by demonstrations on heifer selection by Banta, and a processing and branding demonstration by Freking.

The event will conclude at about 4 p.m., Triplett said.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 33,300

Texas 14,900. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 24 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 675 lbs 239.00; 750-775 lbs 235.27; Jan 650 lbs 225.50; 750 lbs 229.60; Feb 750 lbs 222.50; Del Current 750 lbs 239.25; 800-825 lbs 233.28; Dec 775 lbs 229.40; Jan 700 lbs 229.35; 750 lbs 226.35. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 625 lbs 244.80; 665-700 lbs 239.89; 700-750 lbs 239.89; 700-750 lbs 237.41; 750-800 lbs 233.36; 800-825 lbs 228.23; 855-895 lbs 219.66; Del Current 675 lbs 232.00; 740 lbs 240.00; 750-775 lbs 234.49; 800 lbs 233.01; 875 lbs 223.50; Nov 750 lbs 232.50; 800 lbs 232.00; Dec 750 lbs 226.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs 228.05; Dec 700-725 lbs 216.95; Jan 650 lbs 225.62; 700 lbs 218.65; 750 lbs 214.40; Feb 650 lbs 221.00; Del Current 650 lbs 230.00; 700 lbs 232.09; Jan 650 lbs 224.50. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 700 lbs 225.65; 775 lbs 219.50; Del Current 700 lbs 222.00; 775 lbs 216.50.

Oklahoma 2500. 90 pct over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-725 lbs 240.20; 800-825 lbs 230.81. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 670 lbs 231.81; 700 lbs 229.83; 750 lbs 228.81; Jan 650 lbs 221.50; Del Current 700 lbs 229.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 525 lbs 246.50.

New Mexico 3000. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 34 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700 lbs 240.00; 750 lbs 238.25; 800 lbs 235.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 625 lbs 244.56; 675 lbs 230.60; 700-740 lbs 233.67; 750-775 lbs 233.79; 800 lbs 232.67; 875 lbs 221.58. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 650 lbs 228.50; 700 lbs 231.25. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 775 lbs 214.58.

Kansas 7300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 4 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 850 lbs 232.45; Mar 900 lbs 213.00; Apr 900 lbs 213.00; Del Current 690 lbs 252.40; 750 lbs 239.43; 895 lbs 223.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 750 lbs 222.74; 825 lbs 225.17; Del Current 620-625 lbs 246.18; 665-700 lbs 244.27; 700-750 lbs 241.63; 755-790 lbs 236.04; 800 lbs 236.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Nov 750 lbs 223.71; Del Current 700 lbs 231.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — October 31
National feeder cattle receipts: 277,200

Calves pretty much dominating receipts this week as prices for calves in the Northern Plains sold mostly $5-10 lower. Calves in the Southern Plains and the Southeast traded unevenly steady to $5 higher as calf values increased for winter wheat grazing demand. True yearling supplies have become tight and values have remained constant as yearling prices this week traded steady to firm with instances $5 higher. Price levels remain very attractive for yearlings coming off grass with good weighing conditions and strings of long timed weaned fancy calves. The other side of the coin is extreme prejudice against unweaned fleshy bawlers (high risk) in many cases selling in small consignments of mixed quality and color. Many of these calves sell far behind the former and for good reason, it may seem unfair that there’s such a disparaging difference in demand for calves that don’t appear that much different. But to the trained eye of an order buyer or a seasoned rancher/farmer feeder there can be quite a difference in quality of these calves. With prices at record levels for calves and anxiety separation setting in from missing its mother can cause health issues adding to the discounts. With sick pens getting full in many areas of the Southern and Northern Plains which is typical for October and the feeder cattle markets to feel the pressure and challenges these calves bring. However, producers can add value to their calves by pre-conditioning with a full vaccination program and weaning them for at least 45 days. One of the widest price gaps in the feeder market is on a long-timed weaned/thin 650 lb old crop yearling and an unweaned/fleshy 650 lb bawling calf which can easily be $25-30 cwt. Corn prices caught some enthusiasm this week with harvest at a slower pace with 46 percent completed compared to the 5-year average of 65 percent complete. Farmers are harvesting soybeans ahead of corn mostly due to the price relationship. But, if grain traders return to trading strictly corn fundamentals corn could see a downturn with sufficient amount of corn on hand. Once farmer/feeders get through corn harvest they should return with an aggressive attitude to buy calves with the amount of hay and cheaper corn in their bins. The big question this week is whether there is additional upside to the fed cattle market after last week’s record high of $170. Depending on inventory from now till Thanksgiving and the ‘pairing off’ between packers for the inventory to cover their needs can they still push prices higher? On Friday early live sales in Kansas traded $2 lower at $168. Packers have been chasing inventory needs and may have paid all their willing to pay to regain their margins. A pull back after last week’s record high seems to be in place. With the big question, how much can cash break and is there another cash rally left for 2014? The American consumer has a great variety of competing meats to choose from and is quick to notice when budgets are tight, but with the price of gas at its lowest average cost in near four years should help consumers budget for competing meats. Good markets all need constant buying and favorable news. This week’s auction volume included 37 percent over 600 lbs and 37 percent heifers.

Texas 4800. 55 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (424) 303.17; 450-500 lbs (474) 297.43; 500-550 lbs (517) 283.45; 550-600 lbs (562) 261.07; 600-650 lbs (617) 245.51; pkg 675 lbs 245.00; 700-750 lbs (724) 238.74; 750-800 lbs (768) 216.40; pkg 835 lbs 229.00. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (524) 261.53; 550-600 lbs (568) 249.15; 600-650 lbs (627) 229.69; 650-700 lbs (684) 239.13; pkg 795 lbs 217.00; 800-850 lbs (821) 217.86. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (374) 308.23; 400-450 lbs (413) 285.61; 450-500 lbs (467) 267.66; 500-550 lbs (517) 241.05; 550-600 lbs (577) 234.56; 600-650 lbs (624) 218.30; 650-700 lbs (675) 218.57; 700-750 lbs (715) 214.70. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (388) 267.94; 400-450 lbs (430) 275.99; 450-500 lbs (471) 243.51; 550-600 lbs (575) 217.44; 600-650 lbs (632) 213.57; 650-700 lbs (692) 221.00; 750-800 lbs (759) 218.52.

Oklahoma 25,900. 54 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 366.46; 350-400 lbs (373) 336.03; 400-450 lbs (426) 328.07; 450-500 lbs (470) 302.15; 500-550 lbs (525) 289.03; 550-600 lbs (566) 273.90; 600-650 lbs (625) 252.94; 650-700 lbs (663) 243.42; 700-750 lbs (722) 237.08; 750-800 lbs (771) 237.77; 800-850 lbs (824) 234.75; 850-900 lbs (880) 227.76; 900-950 lbs (938) 220.01; 950-1000 lbs (969) 209.44. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (391) 338.24; 400-450 lbs (436) 310.76; 450-500 lbs (465) 284.37; 500-550 lbs (526) 276.71; 550-600 lbs (575) 256.49; 600-650 lbs (628) 243.80; 650-700 lbs (677) 238.94; 700-750 lbs (731) 230.82; 750-800 lbs (786) 230.38; 800-850 lbs (824) 218.83. Holsteins: Large 3 500-550 lbs (513) 191.11; pkg 670 lbs 171.00; load 760 lbs 186.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (282) 322.25; 300-350 lbs (330) 297.01; 350-400 lbs (376) 294.99; 400-450 lbs (426) 280.49; 450-500 lbs (471) 264.24; 500-550 lbs (520) 250.27; 550-600 lbs (572) 234.52; 600-650 lbs (626) 236.37; 650-700 lbs (671) 237.95; 700-750 lbs (729) 229.37; 750-800 lbs (751) 224.08; 800-850 lbs (814) 212.56; 900-950 lbs (910) 193.91; 950-1000 lbs (974) 195.40; 1000-1050 lbs (1024) 188.06. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (316) 294.34; 350-400 lbs (382) 274.93; 400-450 lbs (424) 261.40; 450-500 lbs (475) 253.40; 500-550 lbs (534) 238.12; 550-600 lbs (585) 227.29; 600-650 lbs (621) 227.01; 650-700 lbs (678) 218.55; 700-750 lbs (734) 217.89; 750-800 lbs (765) 209.69; 800-850 lbs (828) 212.34; 850-900 lbs (877) 197.50.

New Mexico 6600. 36 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 364.32; 350-400 lbs (380) 348.76; 400-450 lbs (423) 315.95; 450-500 lbs (468) 287.31; 500-550 lbs (517) 269.21; 550-600 lbs (563) 259.13; 600-650 lbs (628) 233.97; 650-700 lbs (672) 226.60; 750-800 lbs (756) 216.45; 850-900 lbs (881) 186.52. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (327) 333.16; 350-400 lbs (377) 310.21; 400-450 lbs (416) 300.22; 450-500 lbs (472) 264.05; 500-550 lbs (526) 256.51; 550-600 lbs (585) 239.70; 600-650 lbs (637) 221.84; 650-700 lbs (671) 218.62; 700-750 lbs (722) 203.00; 750-800 lbs (777) 285.80; 800-850 lbs (828) 193.19; 850-900 lbs (869) 172.68. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (280) 326.18; 300-350 lbs (340) 312.77; 350-400 lbs (374) 282.59; 400-450 lbs (414) 282.66; 450-500 lbs (474) 254.46; 500-550 lbs (527) 247.53; 550-600 lbs (575) 229.61; 600-650 lbs (626) 222.15; 650-700 lbs (676) 207.06; 700-750 lbs (718) 204.70. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (341) 262.48; 350-400 lbs (360) 262.19; 400-450 lbs (428) 244.65; 450-500 lbs (473) 239.85; 500-550 lbs (526) 231.07; 550-600 lbs (569) 215.05; 600-650 lbs (626) 222.72; 750-800 lbs (774) 186.83.

Kansas 14,100. 65 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (375) 357.54; 400-450 lbs (425) 346.40; 450-500 lbs (474) 297.93; 500-550 lbs (515) 303.75; 550-600 lbs (577) 285.54; 600-650 lbs (617) 272.22; 650-700 lbs (662) 262.39; pkg 715 lbs 247.00; 750-800 lbs (790) 250.97; 800-850 lbs (824) 233.27; 850-900 lbs (875) 228.86; 900-950 lbs (918) 225.95; few loads 1020 lbs 213.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (426) 320.69; 450-500 lbs (476) 302.77; 500-550 lbs (529) 298.38; 550-600 lbs (570) 275.58; 600-650 lbs (625) 266.43; 650-700 lbs (667) 252.17; 700-750 lbs (720) 238.21; 750-800 lbs (766) 237.77; 800-850 lbs (817) 225.64; 850-900 lbs (885) 220.90; 900-950 lbs (915) 216.04; 950-1000 lbs (986) 206.43. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (340) 356.87; 350-400 lbs (387) 327.72; 400-450 lbs (412) 312.95; 450-500 lbs (484) 282.03; 500-550 lbs (532) 283.85; 550-600 lbs (566) 262.23; 600-650 lbs (620) 253.04; 650-700 lbs (657) 233.90; 700-750 lbs (726) 232.67; 750-800 lbs (781) 226.44; 900-950 lbs (939) 207.46. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (476) 278.38; 500-550 lbs (529) 269.72; 550-600 lbs (579) 252.14; 600-650 lbs (615) 241.98; 650-700 lbs (668) 225.81; 700-750 lbs (737) 228.71; 750-800 lbs (782) 221.09; 800-850 lbs (809) 213.65; 850-900 lbs (860) 210.23.

Missouri 28,600. 34 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (280) 335.63; 300-350 lbs (325) 350.31; 350-400 lbs (380) 335.92; 400-450 lbs (423) 327.91; 450-500 lbs (476) 304.94; 500-550 lbs (523) 281.47; 550-600 lbs (575) 267.72; 600-650 lbs (621) 252.85; 650-700 lbs (666) 250.24; 700-750 lbs (721) 249.94; 750-800 lbs (772) 237.33; 800-850 lbs (841) 235.04; 850-900 lbs (886) 231.46; 900-950 lbs (936) 222.58. Medium and Large 12 300-350 lbs (330) 301.72; 350-400 lbs (371) 294.85; 400-450 lbs (426) 278.12; 450-500 lbs (477) 265.96; 500-550 lbs (524) 256.25; 550-600 lbs (576) 245.29; 600-650 lbs (628) 240.29; 650-700 lbs (673) 228.55; 700-750 lbs (734) 239.52; 750-800 lbs (778) 223.79; 800-850 lbs (833) 232.44; 850-900 lbs (878) 222.12. Holsteins: Large 3 350-400 lbs (394) 199.36; 650-700 lbs (679) 181.92; 850-900 lbs (894) 169.88; 900-950 lbs (943) 164.56. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (278) 296.86; 300-350 lbs (320) 310.13; 350-400 lbs (376) 294.02; 400-450 lbs (428) 277.92; 450-500 lbs (479) 264.92; 500-550 lbs (522) 254.11; 550-600 lbs (576) 243.52; 600-650 lbs (621) 234.55; 650-700 lbs (666) 235.96; 700-750 lbs (719) 228.71; 750-800 lbs (759) 225.22. Medium and Large 1-2 250-300 lbs (285) 262.64; 300-350 lbs (324) 261.62; 350-400 lbs (378) 266.25; 400-450 lbs (429) 247.66; 450-500 lbs (476) 242.94; 500-550 lbs (527) 242.34; 550-600 lbs (571) 230.52; 600-650 lbs (621) 222.66; 650-700 lbs (682) 211.50; 700-750 lbs (722) 227.33; 750-800 lbs (762) 224.50.

Arkansas 7400. 29 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 325.86; 350-400 lbs (372) 312.87; 400-450 lbs (422) 296.10; 450-500 lbs (472) 280.38; 500-550 lbs (522) 261.68; 550-600 lbs (571) 248.36; 600-650 lbs (620) 237.64; 650-700 lbs (668) 231.46. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 289.45; 350-400 lbs (375) 281.15; 400-450 lbs (424) 261.80; 450-500 lbs (472) 248.29; 500-550 lbs (525) 232.92; 550-600 lbs (571) 228.30; 600-650 lbs (621) 218.47; 650-700 lbs (668) 214.86.

 

 

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Monday, November 10, 2014 2:10 PM