Mexico Open For Fed Cattle

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – Most farm groups reacted with enthusiasm after lawmakers introduced a long-awaited Trade Promotion Authority bill in Congress. The bill, which was introduced April 16, could be taken up in the Senate Finance Committee next week with a parallel bill also moving in the House. The Trade Promotion Authority legislation is considered essential to closing the Trans Pacific Partnership, a 12-nation deal that would be the largest free-trade agreement in the country’s history.

The American Farm Bureau said the U.S. has much to gain through TPA and it will help agricultural exports continue to climb. Ag exports reached a record $153.5 billion in fiscal-year 2014. Farm Bureau President Bob Stallman said TPA is central to completing trade talks. “The U.S. is on the brink of completing its most ambitious trade agenda in years,” Stallman said. “We stand to lose billions of dollars in future U.S. farm exports if Congress fails to pass these vitally important bills.”

The bill has 150 different provisions in which Congress sets guidelines or parameters for any trade deal to come to Congress for an up-or-down vote. Any trade agreement would have 60 days for the public to review it and four months after the president signs it for Congress to vote on the pact.

Still, TPA is drawing fire from largely Democratic-leaning groups such as unions, environmentalists and critics of current food policies. National Farmers Union, which has long been skeptical of the promises of trade deals, also expressed its criticism of TPA as another way to increase trade deficits and lose jobs. “TPA is just the continuation of the same old thing, trade agreements that make huge promises of prosperity and jobs to the American public and deliver nothing but bigger deficits, exported jobs and lost domestic agricultural sales,” said NFU President Roger Johnson.

Trade Promotion Authority should help close the deal on the Trans Pacific Partnership, an agreement that has been under negotiation since 2005. Countries in the talks other than the U.S. include Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. Taiwan and South Korea also are considering joining the pact.

Since the bill would extend TPA through at least 2018, it’s also possible that would give time for the Obama administration or the next president to reach an even larger trade agreement with the European Union. Other farm leaders, particularly those representing specific commodities or products, see opportunities to lower or remove tariffs.

Philip Ellis, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, said past trade agreements have lowered or eliminated tariffs on U.S. beef. Such work must continue for the U.S. to stay competitive. “The U.S. market is one of the most open markets in the world,” said Ellis. “The only way for us to level the playing field is to negotiate increased market access and tariff elimination through free-trade agreements. As a cow/calf producer, the increased trade through these agreements adds value to my cattle and my bottom line. This is not only important for our families, but profitability now sets the tone for future generations of cattlemen and women. I urge Congress to quickly pass TPA to give our negotiators the credibility needed to move forward on pending free-trade agreements.”

The National Chicken Council hailed the bill’s introduction. The group noted that China and Russia used to be major poultry importers, but have curtailed their purchases in recent years. Thus, it’s critical to lower tariffs and expand market access elsewhere. “Passage of TPA would help ensure foreign access for U.S. chicken, generate more farm income, jobs in rural districts, and improve the U.S. trade balance,” said Mike Brown, president of the National Chicken Council.

The U.S. dairy industry also praised the bill, citing that the U.S. now exports the equivalent of oneseventh of its milk production. TPA is the key to unlocking future export opportunities, the group said. “Knowing that a trade agreement will be considered by Congress under Trade Promotion Authority paves the way to press our negotiating partners to make their best offers on the most sensitive issues,” said Tom Suber, president of the U.S. Dairy Export Council. “Clearly, dairy exports fall into that category and the U.S. needs all the tools it can muster to get the best possible deal.”

Wade Cowan, president of the American Soybean Association, said TPA has always helped drive demand for soybean production. “As producers of the nation’s leading farm export, soybean farmers know that trade supports rural economies, and ties American producers to consumers around the world,” Cowan said. “That’s a role we cherish, and one that will be significantly advanced by the legislation introduced today.”

It was ditto for the National Corn Growers Association. Chip Bowling, a Maryland farmer and NCGA president, said TPA is critical to ensuring farmers get the best possible deal in trade agreements. Still, Bowling said the clock is ticking on the Pacific and European trade deals. “Trade benefits American corn and livestock farmers, workers and consumers. Agricultural exports are already a major driver of the U.S. economy, supporting more than 1 million American jobs. If we remove trade barriers and expand our access to global markets, American corn and livestock farmers can do even more,” said Bowling.

The National Association of Wheat Growers stressed the importance of trade deals to the industry when 50% of wheat is exported. “Passage of TPA would send a strong signal that Congress and the administration are united in their commitment to opening markets for the benefit of farmers and rural communities and creating jobs throughout this country,” said NAWG President Brent Blankenship.

U.S. Corn Yields Projected Higher With
El Nino Onset

By Bryce Anderson
DTN Senior Ag Meteorologist

Omaha (DTN) – U.S. corn growers could see a bumper crop this year thanks to warm waters in the Pacific Ocean. Pacific Ocean forecasts from almost every international weather agency, including the U.S. Climate Prediction Center and the Australia Bureau of Meteorology, call for a weak-to-moderate El Nino to be in effect either from now, or by June at the latest, through November. This timespan covers the entire Northern Hemisphere summer.

El Nino describes the state of affairs when equator-region Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures reach sustained levels of 1 degree or more Celsius (2 degrees Fahrenheit) above average, and are accompanied by a barometer feature called the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) posting a consistent value of -8.0 or lower.

El Nino typically develops during the November-December timeframe. But recent Pacific Ocean trends suggest El Nino-related atmospheric patterns are in effect. “The sea surface temperatures are warming on the equator; also, there are very warm temperatures below the surface,” said South Dakota state climatologist Dennis Todey. “These features lead to an enhanced probability of El Nino continuing.”

El Nino prospects are being closely watched because there is a strong likelihood of bountiful corn production during seasons when El Nino is in effect. A DTN review of summer seasons with El Nino in effect shows that, going back to 1950, corn yields exceeded trend line more than half the time, and included such record-yielding seasons as 1969, 1972, 1982 and 2004, when final corn yields were more than 10% above trend line. “Those are big numbers,” said DTN Contributing Analyst Joel Karlin. “If you succeed like that in baseball, you’re in the Hall of Fame.”

While Todey isn’t predicting double-digit-percentage-above-trend-line yields, he is confident about how El Nino will treat corn production this year. “We tend to have better cropping years for corn and beans during summertime El Nino events. They tend to not be hot and tend to not be dry,” he said. “I am leaning toward above trend-line yields.”

DTN Senior Ag Meteorologist Mike Palmerino has also seen indicators of El Nino conditions form. “(Pacific) sea surface temperatures that I track have warmed up to almost one-and-a-half degrees Celsius above normal from March through mid-April,” he said. As to whether El Nino will be around the entire growing season, however, Palmerino is cautious but still optimistic about the general growing season. “We are seeing some of the same features this season that we did a year ago,” he said.

As far as the grain market’s reaction to a favorable yield prospect, DTN Analyst Todd Hultman looks for a generally bearish slant. “It is fair to say that another year of beneficial weather will be bearish for corn prices, because it will allow potential buyers to sit back with no worries about supply concerns,” Hultman said.

Marbling Research Shows Healthy Fat In Beef Has Benefits

College Station – Beef with reasonable marbling and juicy taste is preferred among consumers, and industry leaders continue to monitor how to consistently produce a product with these traits. A recent research article addresses the biology and biochemistry of beef marbling and its effects on production systems, carcass and fat quality.
“We need fat in beef to improve the eating experience,” said Dr. Stephen Smith, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and Regents Professor in the department of animal science at Texas A&M University. “We can increase the fat and marbling throughout the production cycle, but for many years there’s been this perception among consumers that too much fat in ground beef isn’t a good thing. Against conventional wisdom, ground beef of all kinds actually is healthy for you.”
Smith teamed with Dr. Brad Johnson, Gordon W. Davis Regent’s Chair in the department of animal and food science at Texas Tech University, to co-author a paper, “Marbling: Management of cattle to maximize the deposition of intramuscular adipose tissue.”
The research was funded by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Beef Checkoff Program and can be found online at http://bit.ly/1EwH8x6.
“In our research, we examined young cattle just before they marbled, and were primarily looking at genes related to fatty acid composition,” Smith said. “We’ve always had a strong interest in the monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, which is abundant in olive oil and is a healthful fatty acid. We start out the marbling article relating how increasing the amount of fat in beef is definitely related to palatability. So we want to increase the fat content to a certain level to provide a good eating experience.”
In the research article, Smith and Johnson discuss how as more cattle fatten and put down marbling, the fat becomes healthier because there is a replacement of saturated fats with oleic acid.
“We are very interested in that,” Smith said. “What are the cellular processes that regulate this very natural increase in oleic acid in beef?”
Smith said Johnson looked at gene expression associated with fat development. In general terms in transitioning from pasture or grass feeding, to feedlot feeding there is profound increase in genes associated with fat development and making more oleic acid, Smith said.
“You can barely detect expression of genes related to marbling and fat composition in cattle on pasture, but much more so when cattle are fed grain,” he said. “The longer they are on feed the more oleic acid they deposit. If you take Korean Hanwoo or Japanese Waygu, which are fed up to 30 months of age, they have an extraordinary amount of marbling and oleic acid. Hanwoo and Wagyu beef marbling fat is very soft, which provides a juicy mouth feel.”
VIDEO REPORT: https://youtu.be/hoAz7ui0f4E.
Smith said within the article they describe the published ground-beef studies and how ground beef affects cholesterol in humans.
“In most studies, ground beef increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol – the good cholesterol – in men and women,” he said.
According to the research, the relationship between fat and overall palatability “underscores the importance of grain feeding and intramuscular lipid in beef quality.”
As fat increases, it is accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of saturated fatty acids and trans-fatty acids with a corresponding increase in oleic acid and other monounsaturated fatty acids.
“The more cattle fatten, (the more) they put down more marbling and the more healthful the beef is,” Smith said.
Both Smith and Johnson said they wondered why. Randomized, controlled studies evaluated individuals who consumed ground beef formulated from long-fed, grain-fed steers for five weeks (five patties per week), compared to consumption of regular ground beef – lower in oleic acid. HDL cholesterol increased significantly in normocholesterolemic men and postmenopausal women fed the high-oleic acid ground beef. In these studies, the men consumed ground beef containing 24 percent fat and the women consumed ground beef containing 20 percent fat.
The conclusions were that, even at these high levels of fat intake, ground beef had no negative effects on lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism in men and women, and ground beef naturally enriched in oleic acid had positive health benefits.
“We hope to convince everyone in the beef production chain, all the way from producers to retailers, that healthy fat in beef not only improves flavor, but you can modify the animal naturally so that the beef contains more oleic acid,” Smith said. “This provides a very palatable product that, even though it contains a relatively high level of fat, is not going to have a negative impact on cholesterol metabolism in humans.”

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 44,800

Texas 26,400. 99 pct over 600 lbs. 34 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750-775 lbs 212.50; 800-825 lbs 206.20; 850-860 lbs 202.83; June 775 lbs 212.50; July 750-765 lbs 214.00; Del Current 750-775 lbs 213.55; 800 lbs 209.13; 850-900 lbs 196.19; 900-925 lbs 190.21; May 750 lbs 214.00; July 750 lbs 220.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 650 lbs 225.28; 735 lbs 223.22; 750-795 lbs 208.88; 800-845 lbs 200.45; 850-900 lbs 197.87; May 750 lbs 213.80; 825 lbs 200.50; Del Current 695 lbs 215.00; 730 lbs 224.00; 750 lbs 214.25; 850 lbs 205.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-735 lbs 203.36; 750-775 lbs 198.39; 800 lbs 192.85; June 700 lbs 205.33; July 700 lbs 206.00; Aug 700-725 lbs 204.63; Sept 725 lbs 202.25; Del Current 700-735 lbs 208.50; 780 lbs 195.00; May 725 lbs 203.25; 750 lbs 213.40; July 675 lbs 210.00; 700 lbs 209.51. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725-730 lbs 200.31; Del Current 750-775 lbs 199.01.

Oklahoma 4400. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750 lbs 217.99; 775 lbs 211.20; 800-840 lbs 206.70; 850-865 lbs 200.89; 900 lbs 193.23; July 750 lbs 218.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 780 lbs 206.39; 840 lbs 193.99; 875 lbs 193.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 206.00; 750 lbs 199.90; July 700 lbs 207.29; Del Current 720-725 lbs 204.55. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 770 lbs 195.03.

New Mexico 2000. 89 pct over 600 lbs. 52 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current load 850 lbs 200.00; load 900 lbs 185.00; May load 750 lbs 213.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current few loads 730 lbs 222.82; load 750 lbs 211.94; May load 750 lbs 213.44. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current few loads 735 lbs 208.00; May few loads 750 lbs 212.40. Medium and Large 1-2 Current few load 750 lbs 198.76.

Kansas 5100. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 29 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 800 lbs 212.00; 850-875 lbs 203.55; Del Current 750 lbs 221.00; 750-780 lbs 211.02; 815-840 lbs 207.19; 950-960 lbs 189.15. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 815-840 lbs 201.64. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 204.96; 765-775 lbs 200.68; Del Current 750 lbs 201.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — April 17
National feeder cattle receipts: 221,700

Feeder cattle and calves sold steady to mostly $5 lower to start the week, after cattle futures last Friday declined sharply with near limit losses on the feeder cattle contracts. Market watchers were also disappointed by limited cash trade and lower prices paid on fed cattle as weekly slaughter was very light at 502,000 head. Momentum redeveloped across the live and feeder cattle futures to start the week and gained ground until this Friday’s collapse. From mid-week on feeder cattle and calves also strengthened with many auctions reporting steady to instances $3-5 higher. In the Southeastern regions feeder calves were mostly $2-6 lower. In addition to market pressure on feeder calves, lightweight offerings are now overwhelmingly made up of new crop fall born calves which are not always highly demanded by stocker buyers as many are unweaned and fleshy. With higher futures and strengthening boxed-beef prices the feedlot managers this week will have no reason to back down from higher asking prices. Unpredictable attitudes are dictating market direction as of late, resembling a poker game where every player is either all-in or folded on every hand. Volatility is the only rule that cattle markets abide by lately with the debate of how high is high enough. These are the results of an industry yearning for profits as packers have been operating with negative margins for some time, but have been successful in moving boxed beef higher at light movement and can he keep enticing the retailer into the market at higher money. All participants in the cattle industry are leery but no one wants to be caught with empty pens or pastures when profit opportunities appear. Auction receipts were again fairly heavy this week especially in the Northern Plains where in Ogallala, NE on Thursday sold 155 fancy steers weighing 615 lbs at $291, with 60 head of their smaller brothers weighing 528 lbs sold at $315.50. In Mitchell, S.D. on Thursday sold 224 head of value added NHTC steers averaging 815 lbs sold with a weighted average price of $243.98. Corn planting is getting well underway with USDA reporting 2 percent planted on Monday. A slower than expected pace but not a problem at this time especially with today’s planting capabilities to cover acres in a very short time.

Texas 7200. 73 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (422) 322.22; 450-500 lbs (490) 298.74; 500-550 lbs (533) 279.50; 550-600 lbs (565) 273.01; 600-650 lbs (613) 247.83; 650-700 lbs (669) 229.63; 700-750 lbs (719) 222.25; 750-800 lbs (781) 213.30; 800-850 lbs (824) 207.70; 850-900 lbs (879) 195.99; pkg 915 lbs 192.50; 950-1000 lbs (963) 183.84; 1000-1050 lbs (1017) 178.04. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (486) 290.15; 500-550 lbs (542) 269.81; 550-600 lbs (577) 257.00; 600-650 lbs (625) 230.55; 700-750 lbs (728) 210.01; 750-800 lbs (781) 208.42; 800-850 lbs (832) 203.99; 850-900 lbs (881) 187.79. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (431) 286.59; 450-500 lbs (474) 264.28; 500-550 lbs (519) 254.96; 550-600 lbs (574) 236.30; 600-650 lbs (631) 218.29; 650-700 lbs (686) 207.24; 700-750 lbs (740) 201.97; 750-800 lbs (776) 194.15; 800-850 lbs (834) 188.44. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (422) 277.44; 500-550 lbs (526) 239.60; 550-600 lbs (570) 228.79; 600-650 lbs (629) 218.65; 650-700 lbs (691) 197.12; 700-750 lbs (722) 194.07; 750-800 lbs (769) 197.48; 800-850 lbs (807) 182.97.

Oklahoma 21,600. 68 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 362.88; 400-450 lbs (421) 318.60; 450-500 lbs (467) 308.12; 500-550 lbs (521) 287.42; 550-600 lbs (567) 273.89; 600-650 lbs (618) 256.04; 650-700 lbs (682) 231.82; 700-750 lbs (721) 223.68; 750-800 lbs (767) 216.31; 800-850 lbs (820) 206.01; 850-900 lbs (873) 198.77; 900-950 lbs (926) 190.69; 950-1000 lbs (969) 184.82; 1000-1050 lbs (1023) 179.30; load 1075 lbs 174.00. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (385) 319.68; 400-450 lbs (415) 303.00; 450-500 lbs (482) 276.61; 500-550 lbs (519) 266.06; 550-600 lbs (585) 253.62; 600-650 lbs (629) 243.70; 650-700 lbs (691) 226.60; 700-750 lbs (725) 215.11; 750-800 lbs (783) 209.96; 800-850 lbs (834) 200.85; 850-900 lbs (879) 192.57; 900-950 lbs (930) 187.89; load 975 lbs 182.25. Holsteins: Large 3 load 510 lbs 226.50; 600-650 lbs (602) 186.48. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 313.15; 350-400 lbs (357) 310.73; 400-450 lbs (420) 283.72; 450-500 lbs (470) 271.50; 500-550 lbs (514) 258.31; 550-600 lbs (566) 234.62; 600-650 lbs (624) 224.43; 650-700 lbs (674) 212.27; 700-750 lbs (721) 205.03; 750-800 lbs (769) 197.40; 800-850 lbs (814) 191.03; 850-900 lbs (868) 185.59; 900-950 lbs (917) 180.40; 950-1000 lbs (956) 170.91. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (323) 301.02; 350-400 lbs (358) 282.95; 400-450 lbs (428) 264.02; 450-500 lbs (468) 250.08; 500-550 lbs (520) 240.07; 550-600 lbs (582) 232.76; 600-650 lbs (626) 221.53; 650-700 lbs (668) 204.97; 700-750 lbs (719) 197.83; 750-800 lbs (783) 189.44; 800-850 lbs (820) 185.37.

New Mexico 2900. 37 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (424) 322.11; 450-500 lbs (468) 308.17; 500-550 lbs (534) 284.98; 550-600 lbs (574) 271.92; 650-700 lbs (668) 230.09; 700-750 lbs (710) 212.71; 800-850 lbs (810) 205.59. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (344) 327.39; 400-450 lbs (424) 302.56; 450-500 lbs (480) 293.63; 500-550 lbs (543) 257.34; 550-600 lbs (584) 249.79; 600-650 lbs (622) 226.21; 750-800 lbs (770) 208.58. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (374) 311.89; 400-450 lbs (429) 298.19; 450-500 lbs (474) 279.17; 500-550 lbs (522) 255.81; 600-650 lbs (621) 222.28; 850-900 lbs (861) 179.45. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (469) 257.72; 500-550 lbs (530) 254.93; 550-600 lbs (571) 230.17.

Kansas 9900. 81 pct over 600 lbs. 32 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (437) 312.75; 450-500 lbs (476) 311.09; 500-550 lbs (517) 277.18; 550-600 lbs (562) 276.39; 600-650 lbs (625) 259.04; 650-700 lbs (667) 243.87; 700-750 lbs (718) 229.05; 750-800 lbs (790) 218.70; 800-850 lbs (820) 211.43; 850-900 lbs (861) 203.23; 900-950 lbs (919) 194.43; 950-1000 lbs (964) 187.35; 1000-1050 lbs (1015) 187.33. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (427) 296.28; 450-500 lbs (479) 287.72; 500-550 lbs (525) 269.26; 550-600 lbs (575) 263.98; 600-650 lbs (630) 246.77; 650-700 lbs (684) 233.86; 700-750 lbs (737) 216.74; 750-800 lbs (777) 212.59; 800-850 lbs (833) 203.10; 850-900 lbs (878) 196.11; 900-950 lbs (936) 188.26; 950-1000 lbs (980) 182.47. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (369) 295.69; 450-500 lbs (483) 257.81; 500-550 lbs (533) 250.29; 550-600 lbs (579) 236.57; 600-650 lbs (609) 229.23; 650-700 lbs (688) 211.04; 700-750 lbs (714) 206.39; 750-800 lbs (781) 195.43; 800-850 lbs (807) 191.22; 850-900 lbs (873) 188.03. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (388) 282.53; 400-450 lbs (426) 263.24; 450-500 lbs (478) 257.54; 500-550 lbs (520) 243.71; 550-600 lbs (559) 229.33; 600-650 lbs (635) 216.87; 650-700 lbs (673) 213.13; 700-750 lbs (734) 202.01; 750-800 lbs (788) 190.79; 800-850 lbs (844) 187.78; 850-900 lbs (870) 183.43.

Missouri 41,400. 39 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 340.50; 350-400 lbs (373) 331.17; 400-450 lbs (425) 317.71; 450-500 lbs (470) 299.33; 500-550 lbs (522) 280.05; 550-600 lbs (570) 265.02; 600-650 lbs (626) 257.05; 650-700 lbs (672) 244.79; 700-750 lbs (721) 227.38; 750-800 lbs (779) 218.87; 800-850 lbs (825) 207.04; 850-900 lbs (880) 202.56. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 318.84; 350-400 lbs (378) 307.46; 400-450 lbs (428) 290.03; 450-500 lbs (472) 280.64; 500-550 lbs (528) 268.27; 550-600 lbs (574) 257.00; 600-650 lbs (623) 237.41; 650-700 lbs (673) 234.22; 700-750 lbs (723) 222.41; 750-800 lbs (773) 211.10; 800-850 lbs (831) 202.31; 850-900 lbs (874) 192.63; load 1025 lbs 171.50. Holsteins: Large 3 550-600 lbs (590) 204.59; 800-850 lbs (805) 170.01. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (323) 306.01; 350-400 lbs (375) 282.64; 400-450 lbs (426) 270.97; 450-500 lbs (475) 255.96; 500-550 lbs (521) 247.75; 550-600 lbs (572) 237.08; 600-650 lbs (624) 228.62; 650-700 lbs (680) 216.75; 700-750 lbs (729) 209.04; 750-800 lbs (770) 201.71; 800-850 lbs (822) 189.67; 850-900 lbs (883) 184.96. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (332) 278.98; 350-400 lbs (374) 265.37; 400-450 lbs (422) 250.72; 450-500 lbs (479) 243.83; 500-550 lbs (530) 237.78; 550-600 lbs (579) 227.28; 600-650 lbs (625) 218.93; 650-700 lbs (673) 209.87; 700-750 lbs (722) 200.06; 750-800 lbs (770) 189.92.

Arkansas 7400. 22 pct over 600 lbs. 45 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 354.95; 350-400 lbs (373) 334.80; 400-450 lbs (423) 305.21; 450-500 lbs (471) 288.93; 500-550 lbs (529) 275.67; 550-600 lbs (568) 261.10; 600-650 lbs (628) 240.63. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 306.00; 350-400 lbs (374) 290.72; 400-450 lbs (421) 272.42; 450-500 lbs (468) 255.92; 500-550 lbs (516) 242.02; 550-600 lbs (572) 238.17; 600-650 lbs (623) 220.56.

 

 

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Friday, April 24, 2015 12:43 PM