Texas Property Rights Advocates Applaud Eminent Domain Legislation

Austin – The Texans for Property Rights Coalition applauds the filing of SB 740, 741 and 742 aimed at eminent domain reform. The bills expand upon progress made in landmark 2011 eminent domain legislation. The three bills, authored by Senator Lois Kolkhorst, will help level the playing field for property owners who confront corporations and government entities with deep pockets and experienced legal teams.
“Every Texan knows that our private property rights must be protected,” said Senator Kolkhorst. “To protect landowners across Texas, I am proud to be working with the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Texas Farm Bureau, Texas Wildlife Association and many others on a new property rights protection package, Senate Bills 740, 741 and 742. This legislative package gives all landowners the new tools and safeguards they need to protect their land from eminent domain abuse.”
“We are grateful to have an ally like Sen. Kolkhorst who is committed to defending the rights of private landowners,” added Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association President Richard Thorpe. “Property owners continue to be at a huge disadvantage when navigating the condemnation process and these proposed reforms are a great step toward preserving our heritage of land ownership in Texas.”
A growing state with a strong appetite for new development has put a target on Texas private property, leaving landowners searching for a fair offer and process in eminent domain cases.
“We are proposing reasonable changes that many states already have in law. Texas should be a leader in strong and fair private property rights that allow for continued growth and economic prosperity,” Texas Farm Bureau President Russell Boening said. “We aim to build fairness and integrity into the condemnation process to ensure landowners receive fair and just compensation.”
The new legislation will provide for the reimbursement of landowner expenses if they are sued by a condemner and are ultimately awarded significantly more than the final offer. It will also spell out the use and restriction details required within a condemnor’s “bona fide offer” to ensure the entity will properly use and maintain the property.
The three bills provide common sense reforms in several areas of concern for landowners. Additional details on the coalition’s initiatives can be found on TexansForPropertyRights.com.
“We recognize the need for critical infrastructure to support our population and economy, but we believe there is room for rural landowners to be treated more fairly along the way,” Texas Wildlife Association CEO David Yeates said. “These landowners provide enormous benefit to our state by stewarding the open spaces of Texas, and they deserve equitable treatment during condemnation of their private property.’
Approximately 95 percent of state land is privately owned, putting the needs of the public in direct conflict with the rights of Texas property owners. Fair compensation, the groups noted, should be the only option because private property owners find it difficult to face the financial burden of litigation when entities sue them.
Led by the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Texas Farm Bureau and the Texas Wildlife Association, the Texans for Property Rights Coalition consists of 23 organizations committed to the preservation of Texas’ private property rights. The coalition was organized to pursue eminent domain reform during the 2017 Texas legislative session, and will continue to work with legislators to secure the passage of these bills and others proposed in the senate that address the need for reform.
The coalition members include: Texas Farm Bureau, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Texas Wildlife Association, South Texas’ Property Rights Association, Texas Forestry Association, Texas Sheep and Goat Raisers Association, Texas Poultry Federation, Independent Cattlemen’s Association of Texas, Texas Grain Sorghum Association, Plains Cotton Growers Inc., Texas Land and Mineral Owners Association, Texas Association of Dairymen, Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Corn Producers Association of Texas, Riverside and Landowners Protection Coalition, Texas Grain and Feed Association, Texas Citrus Mutual, Texas Hill Country Heritage Association, Texas Coalition for Conservation, Texas Wheat Producers Association, Texas Agricultural Land Trust, Ranchers and Landowners Association of Texas and Texas Nursery and Landscape Association.

Brett Morris, Joan Ruskamp And Chuck Coffey Are New CBB Officers

Cattle producers Brett Morris of Ninnekah, Oklahoma, Joan Ruskamp of Dodge, Nebraska, and Chuck Coffey of Springer, Oklahoma are the new leadership team for the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion & Research Board (CBB), elected unanimously by fellow Beef Board members during the 2017 Cattle Industry Convention in Nashville on Feb. 3, 2017. Morris will serve as chairman, Ruskamp as vice chairman and Coffey as secretary/treasurer of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board to lead the national Beef Checkoff Program for the coming year.
The Beef Board also elected members to serve on the Executive Committee and others to fill CBB seats on the Beef Promotion Operating Committee.
NEW BEEF BOARD OFFICER TEAM
Newly elected CBB Chairman Brett Morris is a third-generation dairy farmer and runs a dairy, cow/calf and stocker operation and the Washita Fertilizer Company in partnership with his father. Theirs is a diversified farm operation, including about 1,000 acres of alfalfa, wheat and grassland, 65 registered Holstein cows, 100-125 beef cows and 200 stocker calves. Morris served as chairman of the Oklahoma Dairy Commission, vice chairman of the Oklahoma Johne’s Advisory Committee, as a district voting delegate to Dairy Farmers of America, a director of the Federation of State Beef Councils, and as chairman and vice chairman of the Oklahoma Beef Council.
2017 CBB Vice Chairman Joan Ruskamp and her husband, Steve, operate a feedlot and row-crop farm west of Dodge, Nebraska. She is a graduate of the University of Nebraska at Curtis, where she earned an associate degree in veterinary medicine in 1980. Joan has been very active in the beef industry, with service to numerous producer organizations. In addition, she has been a 4-H leader for about 20 years, an EMT for more than a decade, and a religious education teacher for nearly 30 years.
2017 CBB Secretary/Treasurer Chuck Coffey is a fifth-generation rancher who grew up on a ranch in the hill country of Harper, Texas. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in range science from Texas A&M. Chuck taught agriculture at Murray State College in Tishomingo, Oklahoma, after completing his master’s in 1985, eventually chairing the department there, until he joined the Noble Foundation as a pasture and range consultant in 1993. He is extremely passionate about ranching and feels blessed to be able to work on the ranch every day.
CBB EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
The 12-member CBB Executive Committee includes the Board’s three officers and eight members elected at-large. The CBB elected the following members to its 2017 Executive committee: Jared Brackett of Idaho, Amelia Kent of Louisiana, Bill King of New Mexico, Gary Sharp of South Dakota, Paul Moss of Tennessee, Don Smith of Texas, Richard Winter of Texas and Barbara Jacques of Oklahoma. CBB Vice Chairman Joan Ruskamp will serve as chairman of the Executive Committee, and CBB officers Brett Morris and Chuck Coffey will also be on the committee, As immediate past CBB Chairman, Anne Anderson of Texas will serve as an advisor to the committee.
The Executive Committee operates under the direction of, and within the policies established by, the full Board and is responsible for carrying out Beef Board policies and conducting business and making decisions necessary to administer the terms and provisions of the Act and Order between meetings of the full Board.
OPERATING COMMITTEE
The Beef Promotion Operating Committee was created by the Beef Promotion Research Act to help coordinate state and national beef checkoff programs. The 20-person committee includes 10 members of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, among them the Board’s three officers and seven others elected directly by Beef Board members. The other 10 members are appointed from the Federation of State Beef Councils.
CBB members elected to the 2017 Beef Promotion Operating Committee during the annual meeting in Nashville include: Chairman Brett Morris; Vice Chairman Joan Ruskamp; Secretary/Treasurer Chuck Coffey; Michael Smith of California, Robert Mitchell of Wisconsin, Hugh Sanburg of Colorado, Stacy McClintock of Kansas, Sarah Childs of Florida, Tammy Basel of South Dakota and Janna Stubbs of Texas.
For more information about your beef checkoff investment, visit MyBeefCheckoff.com.

Cattle Inventory

Estimates in this report are the result of data collected during the January Cattle Survey from a random sample of producers across the nation. Survey procedures ensured that all cattle producers, regardless of size, had a chance to be included in the survey. Data provided by Oklahoma and Texas producers are the foundation of these estimates for the Southern Plains Region. We would like to thank all who responded to the survey and made these estimates possible.
Inventory and calf crop estimates for the previous year were also reviewed using official slaughter data, import and export data, and the relationship of the current survey indications to previous surveys. Prior year inventory items and calf crop were revised at the U.S. level and in most states.
The inventory of Oklahoma cattle and calves totaled 5.00 million head on January 1, 2017, up 4 percent from last year’s inventory. Oklahoma makes up over 5 percent of the total United States inventory.
The inventory of Texas cattle and calves totaled 12.3 million head on January 1, 2017, up 4 percent from last year’s inventory. Texas continues to rank first in the nation in total number of cattle and calves with over 13 percent of the total United States inventory.
Total inventory of all cows that have calved in Oklahoma was 2.13 million head, 9 percent above last year’s total. Beef cow inventory, at 2.10 million head, was up 9 percent from 2016. Milk cow inventory, at 35.0 thousand head, was down 2 thousand head from the 2016 total of 37.0 thousand head.
Total inventory of all cows that have calved in Texas was 4.95 million head, 4 percent above last year’s total. Beef cow inventory, at 4.46 million head, was up 4 percent from 2016. Milk cow inventory, at 490 thousand head, was up 30 thousand head from the 2016 total of 460 thousand head.
Inventory of all heifers 500 pounds and over in Oklahoma totaled 920 thousand on January 1, 2017, 1 percent below 2016. Beef replacement heifers, at 445 thousand head, is 3 percent lower than 2016. Milk replacement heifers totaled 20.0 thousand head, down 20 percent from last year.
Oklahoma inventory of steers 500 pounds and over totaled 900 thousand head on January 1, 2017, down 5 percent from last year. Inventory of calves less than 500 pounds, at 890 thousand head, is 9 percent above last year’s total. The 2016 calf crop totaled 1.87 million head, 8 percent higher than the 2015 calf crop.
Inventory of all heifers 500 pounds and over in Texas totaled 2.42 million on January 1, 2017, 6 percent above 2016. Beef replacement heifers, at 810 thousand head, is 3 percent higher than 2016. Milk replacement heifers totaled 260 thousand head, up 4 percent from last year.
Texas inventory of steers 500 pounds and over totaled 2.59 million head on January 1, 2017, up 1 percent from last year. Inventory of calves less than 500 pounds, at 2.00 million head, is 6 percent above last year’s total. The 2016 calf crop totaled 4.25 million head, 5 percent higher than the 2015 calf crop.
U.S. Highlights: The United States inventory of all cattle and calves totaled 93.6 million head on January 1, 2 percent above last year’s inventory of 91.9 million head.
All cows and heifers that have calved totaled 40.6 million head, up 3 percent from the 39.5 million on January 1, 2016. Beef cows totaled 31.2 million head, up 3 percent from a year ago, while milk cows were up slightly from a year ago at 9.35 million head. Beef replacement heifers, at 6.42 million head, were up 1 percent from the previous year. Milk replacement heifer numbers were down 1 percent to 4.75 million head. The 2016 calf crop was estimated at 35.1 million head, up 3 percent from 2015.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 56,100

Texas 28,200. 72 pct over 600 lbs. 19 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725-735 lbs 129.13; 750-800 lbs 128.11; 800-835 lbs 119.47; 850 lbs 121.42; Apr 600 lbs 132.35; May 750 lbs 123.00; Del Current 700-725 lbs 127.00; 775 lbs 124.00; 800-825 lbs 124.85; 850-885 lbs 124.80; Mar 775 lbs 123.85; 825 lbs 121.00; Apr 750 lbs 127.00; May 575 lbs 130.50 Mex; 775 lbs 122.86; Aug 750 lbs 125.85; 800 lbs 121.35; Sept 800 lbs 122.25. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 695 lbs 124.50; 735-745 lbs 123.87; 770-785 lbs 121.19; 815-845 lbs 119.25; 850 lbs 119.94; Mar 750-790 lbs 122.44; Apr 825 lbs 117.65; May 800 lbs 118.10; Del Current 580 lbs 138.00; 630 lbs 138.00; 660 lbs 137.25; 700 lbs 129.00; 750 lbs 126.12; 800-825 lbs 124.88; 875-880 lbs 125.83; 650-675 lbs 131.48; 825 lbs 123.75; Apr 575 lbs 130.50; 650 lbs 123.00; May 575 lbs 130.50; June 750 lbs 126.79. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 118.04; 750 lbs 116.50; Mar 600 lbs 119.50; Apr 550 lbs 121.35; 725 lbs 117.50; May 650 lbs 118.12; 700 lbs 116.60; June 725 lbs 117.35; Del Current 665 lbs 123.00; 725 lbs 117.00; Mar 700-725 lbs 119.73; May 650 lbs 122.70; 700 lbs 117.45; June 700 lbs 118.26; July 700 lbs 120.40. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725-740 lbs 120.99; Del 620 lbs 130.00; 650 lbs 126.99; 700-705 lbs 123.34; 750-775 lbs 120.87; Mar 625 lbs 125.00; 750 lbs 117.50; Apr 700 lbs 118.50; May 700-725 lbs 118.55.

Oklahoma 4000. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 29 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 765 lbs 125.85; 800-825 lbs 123.04; 885 lbs 125.25; Apr 750 lbs 124.00; Aug 750 lbs 122.87. Medium and Large 1-2 Mar 650 lbs 135.04; 825 lbs 118.00; May 775 lbs 118.65; 800 lbs 117.24; Aug 800 lbs 118.35. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 785 lbs 120.89; 800 lbs 122.71; May 650 lbs 119.70; June 700 lbs 114.69. Medium and Large 1-2 Mar 700 lbs 117.00.

New Mexico 10,700. 34 pct over 600 lbs. 9 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 700-725 lbs 125.00; 800-825 lbs 122.94; Mar 775 lbs 121.85; May 775 lbs 120.92. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 660 lbs 136.39; 800 lbs 125.52; Mar 675 lbs 128.43; 825 lbs 122.52. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Mar 725 lbs 115.85. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 650 lbs 124.95; 725 lbs 114.00; 750-775 lbs 119.14; Mar 625 lbs 122.93; 750 lbs 118.77.

Kansas 1800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 765-785 lbs 126.60; 850-885 lbs 122.76; Del 660 lbs 137.00; Apr 825 lbs 121.50; May 800 lbs 123.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 810 lbs 119.02.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — February 10
National feeder cattle receipts: 213,700

Steer and heifer calves sold $4-10 higher. Feeder steers and heifers traded steady to $5 higher. In the southeast, steers and heifers were steady to $3 higher. Auction receipts were lighter due to the downturn in prices. Trade was active with the best demand for stocker cattle. The cattle market saw some optimism after Feb. 3 rough go-round in the sale barns. Feeder cattle futures have been up and down, with the biggest moves coming mid to late Feb. 10. Despite the roller coaster ride, cattle buyers were aggressive on the light to middle weight calves, as spring is approaching fast and buyers are thinking of green pastures ahead. Replacement type heifers are also in good demand and are bringing about the same or more than steers within the same weight categories. In Bassett, Nebraska a few loads of good quality replacement heifers weighing between 650-685 lbs sold from $152-166 and 700 lb heifers brought up to $163. That’s roughly a $20-30 premium per hundred weight, as compared to heifers of comparable weight ranges and from the same sale, going to the feed yard. Other locations have also seen a spike in prices for replacements. The temperature swings across the Plains and Midwest have been extreme this week. In Billings, MT and parts of the northern plains, some cattle auctions saw light receipts as the winter storm moved in, causing road closures due to poor road and travel conditions. Across the mid-section of the country, temperatures plummeted with highs only in the teens and 20’s. However, unseasonably warm weather is expected going into the weekend. Several areas are expecting to warm up in the 60’s and 70’s, with some locations in the southern plains reaching up to 80 degrees. Feedlot trading materialized on Feb. 8 with live sales in Nebraska selling steady to $1 higher, mostly from $119-120 and dressed sales steady at $190, with a few up to $191 on a light test. Colorado live sales were $1 higher at $120. In the southern plains trading was moderate on moderate demand. Live sales sold $1 higher at $120, with a few at $120.50. Iowa and Minnesota dressed sales were mostly steady at $190, with a few at $191. Live sales were lightly tested at $118. The Fed Cattle Exchange on Feb. 8 sold 3,615 head. Prices reported in Texas and Kansas were mostly from $119.75-120.50 and in Nebraska mostly from $115-117, with a few from $118-119. Pen conditions in the northern feedlots remain muddy as the snow melts. This is creating havoc for feed yards as outgoing cattle are carrying too much tag, which is affecting yields. Choice boxed beef closed at $187.63, down $3.77 and Select at $185.65, dn $4.28 from last Feb. 3 close.

Texas 5400. 56 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (430) 165.08; 450-500 lbs (496) 156.47; 500-550 lbs (515) 150.43; 550-600 lbs (563) 139.57; 600-650 lbs (679) 137.01; 700-750 lbs (727) 133.43; 750-800 lbs (773) 129.76; 800-850 lbs (819) 126.32; 850-900 lbs (861) 123.90; 900-950 lbs (918) 121.39. Medium and Large 1-2 pkg 452 lbs 155.00; 500-550 lbs (523) 133.12; 550-600 lbs (567) 138.20; pkg 637 lbs 133.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (336) 165.90; 350-400 lbs (385) 142.29; 400-450 lbs (414) 144.41; 450-500 lbs (472) 137.43; 500-550 lbs (524) 123.17; 550-600 lbs (584) 121.62; 600-650 lbs (626) 124.90; 650-700 lbs (668) 124.62; 700-750 lbs (706) 120.19; 750-800 lbs (768) 118.85; 800-850 lbs (814) 119.59. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (419) 134.73; 500-550 lbs (525) 123.66; 550-600 lbs (590) 117.43; 600-650 lbs (619) 123.45.

Oklahoma 25,000. 64 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (312) 182.57; 350-400 lbs (368) 177.62; 400-450 lbs (430) 176.04; 450-500 lbs (470) 167.81; 500-550 lbs (524) 161.56; 550-600 lbs (574) 152.14; 600-650 lbs (622) 144.42; 650-700 lbs (673) 137.85; 700-750 lbs (728) 132.98; 750-800 lbs (771) 129.75; 800-850 lbs (821) 124.70; 850-900 lbs (873) 123.64; 900-950 lbs (922) 121.68; 950-1000 lbs (967) 121.77; 1000-1050 lbs (1009) 117.00. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (336) 174.87; 350-400 lbs (372) 163.11; 400-450 lbs (435) 166.98; 450-500 lbs (483) 159.61; 500-550 lbs (531) 147.48; 550-600 lbs (571) 144.10; 600-650 lbs (625) 131.26; 650-700 lbs (673) 131.13; 700-750 lbs (714) 128.11; 750-800 lbs (789) 123.60; 800-850 lbs (839) 119.47; 850-900 lbs (886) 121.18; 900-950 lbs (922) 120.65. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 150.07; 350-400 lbs (378) 148.35; 400-450 lbs (425) 143.57; 450-500 lbs (468) 141.16; 500-550 lbs (522) 135.06; 550-600 lbs (577) 179.44; 600-650 lbs (623) 128.73; 650-700 lbs (673) 126.08; 700-750 lbs (724) 122.55; 750-800 lbs (764) 121.14; 800-850 lbs (817) 119.62; 850-900 lbs (870) 117.80; 900-950 lbs (924) 115.63; few loads 960 lbs 118.25. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (322) 143.47; 350-400 lbs (388) 135.12; 400-450 lbs (428) 134.94; 450-500 lbs (481) 130.31; 500-550 lbs (533) 127.81; 550-600 lbs (575) 122.85; 600-650 lbs (619) 118.27; 650-700 lbs (668) 122.81; 700-750 lbs (723) 116.69; 750-800 lbs (789) 118.32.

New Mexico 5100. 42 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (424) 178.76; 450-500 lbs (478) 158.27; 500-550 lbs (522) 149.64; 550-600 lbs (568) 141.37; 600-650 lbs (616) 139.19; 650-700 lbs (677) 131.56; 700-750 lbs (723) 125.83; 750-800 lbs (782) 123.34; 850-900 lbs (878) 118.18. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (384) 176.70; 400-450 lbs (426) 165.38; 450-500 lbs (477) 144.69; 500-550 lbs (520) 142.44; 550-600 lbs (577) 135.12; 600-650 lbs (623) 134.70; 650-700 lbs (677) 127.18. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (320) 167.07; 400-450 lbs (427) 143.42; 450-500 lbs (472) 137.90; 500-550 lbs (522) 127.38; 550-600 lbs (575) 124.52; 600-650 lbs (624) 120.80. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (326) 154.92; 350-400 lbs (371) 149.90; 400-450 lbs (425) 136.42; 450-500 lbs (467) 134.71; 500-550 lbs (529) 123.14; 550-600 lbs (578) 120.64; 600-650 lbs (625) 119.19.

Kansas 11,700. 86 pct over 600 lbs. 36 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (368) 185.84; 450-500 lbs (476) 178.73; 500-550 lbs (519) 168.24; 550-600 lbs (578) 154.83; 600-650 lbs (623) 146.61; 650-700 lbs (671) 139.69; 700-750 lbs (728) 134.92; 750-800 lbs (779) 128.66; 800-850 lbs (821) 126.48; 850-900 lbs (875) 124.46; 900-950 lbs (920) 123.05; 950-1000 lbs (972) 122.95. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (465) 160.56; 500-550 lbs (536) 159.67; 550-600 lbs (586) 150.53; 600-650 lbs (637) 142.79; 650-700 lbs (678) 131.20; 700-750 lbs (731) 127.64; 750-800 lbs (772) 122.29; 800-850 lbs (828) 122.28; 850-900 lbs (862) 122.08; 900-950 lbs (941) 117.81. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (391) 160.25; 450-500 lbs (477) 155.11; 550-600 lbs (575) 138.08; 600-650 lbs (623) 131.20; 650-700 lbs (672) 128.06; 700-750 lbs (727) 123.48; 750-800 lbs (779) 122.41; 800-850 lbs (823) 121.48; 850-900 lbs (869) 118.76; 900-950 lbs (916) 118.94. Large 1-2 pkg 747 lbs 121.75. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (485) 142.69; 500-550 lbs (537) 135.05; 550-600 lbs (595) 129.93; 600-650 lbs (685) 123.24; 700-750 lbs (724) 118.84; 750-800 lbs (774) 119.15; 800-850 lbs (812) 117.17; 850-900 lbs (893) 116.96.

Missouri 26,400. 53 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (330) 172.22; 350-400 lbs (371) 168.15; 400-450 lbs (428) 167.63; 450-500 lbs (479) 163.84; 500-550 lbs (528) 160.44; 550-600 lbs (575) 149.44; 600-650 lbs (625) 142.46; 650-700 lbs (674) 137.25; 700-750 lbs (725) 133.36; 750-800 lbs (771) 125.96; 800-900 lbs (827) 123.90; 850-900 lbs (874) 120.76; 900-950 lbs (922) 121.08. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (380) 160.38; 400-450 lbs (420) 155.65; 450-500 lbs (476) 154.93; 500-550 lbs (527) 147.90; 550-600 lbs (579) 138.71; 600-650 lbs (627) 134.39; 650-700 lbs (672) 130.67; 700-750 lbs (725) 125.36; 750-800 lbs (779) 122.86; 800-850 lbs (809) 122.00; 850-900 lbs (875) 118.16; 900-950 lbs (923) 116.91. Holsteins: Large 3 600-650 lbs (626) 66.58. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 147.09; 350-400 lbs (379) 142.14; 400-450 lbs (429) 142.72; 450-500 lbs (470) 139.87; 500-550 lbs (523) 136.51; 550-600 lbs (577) 130.19; 600-650 lbs (627) 125.73; 650-700 lbs (669) 125.38; 700-750 lbs (728) 121.45; 750-800 lbs (778) 117.86; 800-850 lbs (825) 116.52; 900-950 lbs (916) 114.50. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (372) 132.17; 400-450 lbs (427) 132.39; 450-500 lbs (479) 130.19; 500-550 lbs (526) 127.68; 550-600 lbs (576) 121.95; 600-650 lbs (629) 119.35; 650-700 lbs (672) 117.87; 700-750 lbs (725) 116.58; 750-800 lbs (779) 115.21.

Arkansas 8300. 26 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 176.98; 350-400 lbs (373) 171.68; 400-450 lbs (424) 164.44; 450-500 lbs (472) 157.51; 500-550 lbs (523) 150.20; 550-600 lbs (574) 144.19; 600-650 lbs (623) 137.16; 650-700 lbs (672) 135.19. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 146.90; 350-400 lbs (376) 143.41; 400-450 lbs (422) 137.98; 450-500 lbs (472) 133.51; 500-550 lbs (524) 128.02; 550-600 lbs (573) 124.27; 600-650 lbs (622) 122.44; 650-700 lbs (672) 120.36.

 

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Thursday, February 16, 2017 2:17 PM