Wild Horse Program Facing Future $1B Budget Crisis

By Scott Sonner
Associated Press

Reno, Nev. (AP) – The head of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management says it’s time to admit his agency has a $1 billion problem.
BLM Director Neil Kornze says the administration can’t afford to wage an increasingly uphill battle to protect the ecological health of federal rangeland across the West while at the same time properly managing tens of thousands of wild horses and caring for tens of thousands more rounded up in government corals.
Kornze told The Associated Press the agency may not have done as good of a job as it could have in recent years to underscore the environmental and budgetary crisis looming in its wild horse and burro program.
His experts estimate $1 billion will be needed to care for the 46,000 wild horses and burros currently in U.S. holding facilities over their lifetime. That doesn’t include the cost of future efforts to shrink the population of the record-67,000 now roaming public lands in 10 western states.
“We’re trying to make an effort to be real clear about the challenges because they are significant,” Korzne said.
“We need partners coming to the table, whether it’s states or counties or others,” he said.
The 67,000 horses and burros on the range is a 15 percent increase from last year, and more than double the population that was estimated when President Nixon signed the Wild and Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act into law in 1971. The landmark legislation allows for removals but also grants the animals unique federal protection and requires they be treated humanely during and after their capture.
Korzne said his agency’s horse budget has doubled since 2009 – from $40 million to more than $80 million currently – but “the trajectory of the population has just gone up and up. “Left unchecked, the population naturally doubles every four years.
“It’s a double bind,” Korzne said. “There’s a very real impact on the range when the herds are overpopulated, but it costs us $50,000 per horse if the horse lives out its whole life in holding.”
Kornze said one of the growing problems is a dramatic drop in the private adoptions of gathered mustangs over the past decade from about 8,000 a year to 2,500 or fewer.
Critics fear BLM is exaggerating the numbers to build support for past proposals by livestock interests to slaughter the oldest mustangs that have been placed in long-term holding with little chance of being adopted.
“The BLM’s numbers are inflated estimates to fear-monger elected officials into supporting a breakdown of the 1971 law,” said Anne Novak, executive director of the California-based Protect Mustangs.
Korzne insisted the agency has no intention of allowing the slaughter of federal horses. But he said it’s considering spaying, neutering or otherwise sterilizing some animals that are on the range – something just as distasteful to most horse protection groups who argue the real answer lies in dramatic cutbacks in government-subsidized livestock grazing.
“Wild horses are present on just 12 percent of federal rangelands, which they share with livestock, and their habitat has shrunk by over 40 percent the last four decades,” said Suzanne Roy, executive director of the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign. “The feds consider 67,000 wild horses and burros to be overpopulated, yet there are only 70,000 big horn sheep remaining in the West and they are highly endangered.”

DOJ Drops Appeal On Lesser Prairie Chicken

By Todd Neeley
DTN Staff Reporter

Omaha (DTN) – The U.S. Department of Justice has decided to drop an appeal of a district court decision, ending its pursuit of listing the lesser prairie chicken as endangered through the Endangered Species Act.
The decision comes after the Justice Department had filed arguments May 5 to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, asking the court to review a lower-court ruling in Texas that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s efforts were unconstitutional.
The Justice Department and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offered no explanation for dropping the appeal, saying in a statement efforts to protect the species would continue.
The decision came as a welcomed surprise to rural lawmakers and agriculture groups that fought the push to list the lesser prairie chicken as endangered. Farm organizations had called the listing a threat to farmers and ranchers.
The decision to drop the endangerment listing came in a letter to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas in San Antonio, which ruled recently the efforts to list the lesser prairie chicken were unconstitutional.
The Texas court ruled the listing was “arbitrary and capricious.” The court determined voluntary conservation efforts that have resulted in overall population increases of about 25% from 2014 to 2015, were ignored by the administration.
The Fish and Wildlife Service announced a plan to protect the species in 2014. In July 2015, the agency cited that the prairie chickens were growing in population.
Increases were observed in three of four of the bird’s ecoregions across Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. The Sand Sage Prairie Region of southeast Colorado showed the biggest gain at about 75% from a year ago. The mixed grass prairie region of the northeast Panhandle of Texas, northwest Oklahoma and south-central Kansas saw about a 30% increase, while the shortgrass prairie region of northwest Kansas population grew by about 27%.
Aerial surveys by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies led to estimates that the bird’s population increased by nearly 50% since the 2013 drought in Kansas. As rainfall has returned to historical levels since 2014, the bird’s population has increased.
Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., said in a statement the decision should open the door to continued improvement of lesser prairie chicken habitats without harming agriculture.
“The decision today to drop the appeal highlights this administration’s flawed approach to listing the lesser prairie chicken as a threatened species in the first place,” Moran said. “Stakeholders in Kansas need certainty on the listing. I hope the decision is recognition by the USFWS that increased rainfall and locally driven, voluntary conservation is the best approach to preserving this species – not more burdensome regulations from the federal government.
“My fear is USFWS made a strategic decision to restart the listing process for the bird instead of continuing to fight a losing battle in court. It is incumbent on USFWS to be open and transparent about its future intentions for the LPC listing. I have asked for answers from USFWS, and will continue to advocate for policies that prevent the service from pursuing future efforts to re-list the species.”
Sen. Pat Roberts said in a statement, “I have said all along that with a little rain, we will see the lesser prairie chicken population bounce back. As we have come to expect with the Obama administration, they never let common sense get in the way of a costly regulation.”
The USFWS said it plans to reassess the status of the species based on the court’s ruling and the best available scientific data.
Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, said he was surprised by the move.
“The Obama administration’s decision not to appeal a district court ruling, throwing out the listing of the lesser prairie chicken as a threatened species, is welcome and different news from this administration,” he said.
“The court’s decision to vacate the listing is a win for Oklahoma and the four other state’s conservation agencies and our local and industry partners who have committed funding and other resources to implement a conservation plan without the federal government’s interference. However, even with this win, I will be looking to put safeguards in place to block the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from revisiting the issue until the states’ plan has time to develop and show its success.”
Ethan Lane, executive director of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Federal Lands and Public Lands Council, said in a statement that conservation efforts have to be allowed to work.
“Voluntary conservation efforts like the range-wide plan are working to recover the species and must be given an opportunity to succeed without the unnecessary burden of a federal ESA listing,” he said.

USDA Makes $8.7 Million Available In Risk Management Education Funding

Washington – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Risk Management Agency (RMA) today announced $8.7 million in cooperative agreements for risk management education and training programs. The funding would give organizations needed resources to develop training and education tools to help farmers and ranchers, especially those traditionally underserved or with limited resources, learn how to effectively managing long-term risks and challenges.
Through these partnerships, producers will receive assistance in understanding and using crop insurance programs and other tools so they can make the best risk management decisions for their agricultural operations. Past award recipients have included universities, county cooperative extension offices and nonprofit organizations.
“These partnerships help educate producers on the many new crop insurance options available,” RMA Administrator Brandon Willis said. “Federal crop insurance can help keep farmers and ranchers in business when affected by events beyond their control, and USDA has developed new options over the past few years to assist more types of operators who make up the diverse American agricultural community.”
Available funding includes $4.4 million for the Crop Insurance in Targeted States Program. The program backs development of crop insurance education programs where there is a low level of federal crop insurance participation and availability. The targeted states are Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming.
Additionally, $4.3 million in funding is available for the Risk Management Education Partnerships Program, which provides money for the development of general nationwide crop insurance education as well as other risk management training programs for producers.
A broad range of risk management training activities are eligible for funding consideration. Training can also focus on educating producers on the federal crop insurance program and options resulting from Farm Bill provisions. The agreements will also help train farmers at all levels on risk management options that help secure local food systems and strengthen rural communities. In particular, RMA seeks to fund projects that include innovative approaches in product delivery toward the priorities – such as Whole-Farm Revenue Protection and Farm Financial Benchmarking – listed in each funding opportunity.
The request for applications is available through Grants.gov at www.grants.gov. Visitors can search by catalog of federal domestic assistance (CFDA) number 10.460, Risk Management Partnership program, or CFDA number 10.458, Crop Insurance in Targeted States.
Applications for the Crop Insurance in Targeted States Program and Risk Management Education Partnerships Program are due by 11:59 p.m. EST on July 3, 2016. All applications must be submitted electronically through the Results Verification System website at http://rvs.umn.edu and received by the deadline.
A strong farm safety net is important to sustain the success of American agriculture. USDA’s crop insurance program insured more than 298 million acres, with 1.2 million policies and $102.3 billion worth of coverage in the 2015 crop year. Visit RMA’s website at www.rma.usda.gov to learn more about the agency and its programs.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 50,100

Texas 31,400. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 23 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 675-695 lbs 152.11; 700-730 lbs 148.46; 750-775 lbs 147.32; 800-825 lbs 147.32; 850-875 lbs 140.03; 900-940 lbs 139.45; June 750-775 lbs 147.55; 825 lbs 141.75; July 650 lbs 158.32; 750-775 lbs 146.22; Aug 750-775 lbs 147.81; 800 lbs 143.50; Sept 725 lbs 151.00; 750-775 lbs 146.77; 800 lbs 142.45; Del Current 750-775 lbs 149.90; 800-825 lbs 148.53; 850-875 lbs 148.53; 850-875 lbs 142.44; 900 lbs 140.50; June 650 lbs 161.50; 775 lbs 148.35; 800 lbs 146.15; July 650 lbs 159.75; 700 lbs 154.73; 750-775 lbs 147.64; 800 lbs 145.65; July-Aug 800 lbs 146.80; Aug 700-725 lbs 153.21; 750-775 lbs 149.02; 800 lbs 146.01; Sept 725 lbs 153.00; 750 lbs 146.15; 800 lbs 143.86. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 665 lbs 146.46; 725-740 lbs 143.52; 750-795 lbs 142.63; 800-825 lbs 138.72; 850-875 lbs 136.49; 905-935 lbs 130-59; May-June 725 lbs 146.10; Del Current 650-675 lbs 158.58; 750 lbs 143.72; 800 lbs 146.00; 875 lbs 142.50; 975 lbs 127.00; June 750 lbs 148.50; July 750 lbs 148.50; 800 lbs 147.50; Aug 750-775 lbs 149.64; 800 lbs 146.29; Sept 775 lbs 148.00; 800 lbs 145.50; Oct 800 lbs 143.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 650 lbs 148.00; 725-735 lbs 139.97; 775 lbs 138.00; June 700 lbs 139.67; July 675 lbs 140.20; 700-725 lbs 140.71; Aug 700-725 lbs 139.43; 750 lbs 136.50; Sept 700 lbs 138.40; Current Del 700 lbs 140.35; June 625 lbs 151.15; 725 lbs 139.90; July 650 lbs 146.75; 700-725 lbs 144.26; Aug 700-725 lbs 142.18; Sept 700 lbs 139.75. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 715 lbs 133.50; 760 lbs 132.10; Aug 750 lbs 136.50; Del 625 lbs 147.35; June 700 lbs 140.20.
Oklahoma 6100. 99 pct over 600 lbs. 17 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 750-775 lbs 147.99; 800-825 lbs 144.88; 850-875 lbs 139.13; 900 lbs 136.00; June 800 lbs 143.15; July 700 lbs 153.48; Aug 725 lbs 152.00; 750 lbs 149.00; Sept 725 lbs 151.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 690 lbs 159.00; 750 lbs 140.00; 875-900 lbs 134.31; 925 lbs 133.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 650 lbs 149.00; 750 lbs 140.00; 800 lbs 131.50; Aug 700 lbs 140.64.
New Mexico 100. 100 pct over 600 lbs. No heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 800 lbs 145.00.
Kansas 6100. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 6 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 775 lbs 151.00; 800-825 lbs 150.20; 875 lbs 139.91; Del 935 lbs 131.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 750-795 lbs 145.86; 800-825 lbs 143.67; 850-900 lbs 139.72; May-June 905 lbs 150.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725-735 lbs 143.00; 750-760 lbs 137.38; July 725 lbs 138.30; Del 850 lbs 129.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — May 13
National feeder cattle receipts: 159,000

Steers and heifers sold $5-10 higher with some early and mid-week auctions reporting calf sales as much as $15-20 higher. Higher fed cattle trade last week along with surging boxed beef prices pumped some life back into the feeder market. CME cattle futures started the week with a bang on May 9, with most Live and Feeder Cattle contracts seeing triple digit gains. May 10-11 were pretty quiet in the cattle complex with moderate losses and light activity after corn and beans took a big jump on May 10. Volatility prevailed by the end of the week however, and the futures market took a tumble May 12-13. May 12 late sell off was especially confusing after fat trade developed earlier in the day, mostly $5-6 higher live at $132-136 and dressed sales a whopping $10 higher at $210. Early to mid-week projections had cash trade pegged to be fully steady to (hopefully) $3 higher but clearly packers were more short bought than they were thought to be, even after the huge kill of the past two weeks. That large slaughter volume has certainly helped feedlots get cleaned up on the front end and showlists this week were generally smaller. Supplies of market ready cattle are expected to remain tight through mid-summer which will force packer competition and should provide some solid bottom to the market for the time being. Carcass weights are still dropping, albeit still slower than expected, with the latest data (two weeks delayed) showing another 2 lb drop. Grading data also confirms that feedlots are becoming more current, as not as many cattle are grading Choice, a sign that they are spending fewer days on feed and aren’t quite as big as they have been. Boxed beef has rallied throughout the week, gaining over $10 since May 6, as wholesalers are booking last minute supplies ahead of big meat counter specials for the Memorial Day Holiday. Beef cuts have become more affordable in recent months as customers will hopefully discover, but the true test for the market going into the summer will be what happens to demand after the holiday sales.
Texas 6100. 70 pct over 600 lbs. 43 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 325 lbs 190.00; 400-450 lbs (416) 181.15; 500-550 lbs (534) 182.55; 550-600 lbs (569) 167.27; 650-700 lbs (659) 150.10; 700-750 lbs (725) 149.57; 750-800 lbs (755) 150.49; 800-900 lbs (821) 143.98; 850-900 lbs (868) 139.20; 900-950 lbs (907) 133.60. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (475) 183.09; 500-550 lbs (518) 168.14; 550-600 lbs (585) 164.09; 600-650 lbs (609) 149.60; 650-700 lbs (671) 145.92; 700-750 lbs (705) 146.13; 750-800 lbs (780) 146.23; 850-900 lbs (857) 139.61; 900-950 lbs (937) 127.79. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 340 lbs 180.00; 400-450 lbs (435) 162.47; 450-500 lbs (469) 162.42; 500-550 lbs (516) 154.42; 550-600 lbs (566) 142.62; 600-650 lbs (627) 139.93; 650-700 lbs (675) 141.91; 700-750 lbs (715) 136.08; 750-800 lbs (758) 137.86; 800-850 lbs (822) 133.87; 850-900 lbs (885) 126.33; load 950 lbs 121.50. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (523) 141.01; 550-600 lbs (569) 137.39; 600-650 lbs (643) 141.08; 650-700 lbs (679) 137.34; 750-800 lbs (779) 130.72.
Oklahoma 34,300. 77 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 209.14; 350-400 lbs (378) 208.23; 400-450 lbs (418) 193.74; 450-500 lbs (478) 184.10; 500-550 lbs (518) 181.28; 550-600 lbs (570) 173.11; 600-650 lbs (623) 163.85; 650-700 lbs (669) 160.18; 700-750 lbs (730) 153.59; 750-800 lbs (775) 148.63; 800-850 lbs (832) 144.09; 850-900 lbs (865) 141.89; 900-950 lbs (923) 136.60; 950-1000 lbs (973) 132.08; 1000-1050 lbs (1014) 128.87; 1050-1100 lbs (1068) 127.54. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (377) 195.54; 400-450 lbs (436) 185.04; 450-500 lbs (476) 173.67; 500-550 lbs (544) 166.17; 550-600 lbs (582) 160.41; 600-650 lbs (638) 152.28; 650-700 lbs (672) 155.41; 700-750 lbs (716) 149.78; 750-800 lbs (785) 146.05; 800-850 lbs (838) 139.79; 850-900 lbs (885) 136.02; 900-950 lbs (926) 132.78; 950-1000 lbs (964) 132.11; 1000-1050 lbs (1023) 129.61. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (331) 180.05; 350-400 lbs (375) 178.30; 400-450 lbs (425) 167.52; 450-500 lbs (462) 168.81; 500-550 lbs (528) 163.31; 550-600 lbs (577) 160.22; 600-650 lbs (622) 147.66; 650-700 lbs (677) 145.48; 700-750 lbs (728) 141.36; 750-800 lbs (778) 136.76; 800-850 lbs (830) 132.70; 850-900 lbs (870) 131.01; 900-950 lbs (916) 126.46; 950-1000 lbs (985) 109.62. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (328) 170.13; 350-400 lbs (383) 166.99; 400-450 lbs (426) 158.07; 450-500 lbs (472) 156.96; 500-550 lbs (528) 154.30; 550-600 lbs (581) 148.83; 600-650 lbs (627) 140.53; 650-700 lbs (688) 140.45; 700-750 lbs (724) 137.49; 750-800 lbs (788) 133.84; 800-850 lbs (824) 130.55.
New Mexico 4100. 57 pct over 600 lbs. 48 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (304) 219.27; 350-400 lbs (372) 203.60; 450-500 lbs (469) 181.23; 500-550 lbs (521) 171.72; 550-600 lbs (587) 166.72; 600-650 lbs (611) 160.66; 650-700 lbs (675) 149.73; 750-800 lbs (768) 147.78; 800-850 lbs (810) 145.01; pkg 860 lbs 137.75. Medium and Large 1-2 650-700 lbs (674) 143.91; 700-750 lbs (723) 141.08; 750-800 lbs (789) 140.20. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (317) 190.41; 350-400 lbs (367) 176.98; 400-450 lbs (432) 168.07; 450-500 lbs (483) 159.22; 550-600 lbs (570) 147.27; 600-650 lbs (636) 140.96; 650-700 lbs (682) 143.67; 700-750 lbs (735) 140.72; 750-800 lbs (761) 135.85; 800-850 lbs (826) 124.91. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (431) 168.39; 450-500 lbs (480) 152.53; 600-650 lbs (618) 143.22.
Kansas 12,300. 87 pct over 600 lbs. 41 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (487) 184.96; 500-550 lbs (516) 186.29; 550-600 lbs (560) 176.32; 600-650 lbs (636) 167.55; 650-700 lbs (675) 162.70; 700-750 lbs (722) 156.07; 750-800 lbs (776) 148.82; 800-850 lbs (837) 146.30; 850-900 lbs (877) 144.36; 1000-1050 lbs (1024) 132.58; 1050-1100 lbs (1067) 127.33. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (475) 175.38; 500-550 lbs (528) 175.25; 550-600 lbs (572) 163.73; 600-650 lbs (624) 159.74; 650-700 lbs (688) 149.04; 750-800 lbs (763) 140.40; 800-850 lbs (830) 144.84; 850-900 lbs (890) 139.33; 900-950 lbs (943) 134.89; 950-1000 lbs (973) 128.59; 1000-1050 lbs (1027) 127.09. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (381) 183.17; 400-450 lbs (418) 173.02; 450-500 lbs (465) 171.61; 500-550 lbs (517) 160.11; 550-600 lbs (84) 154.54; 600-650 lbs (613) 154.16; 650-700 lbs (672) 146.23; 700-750 lbs (732) 143.32; 750-800 lbs (776) 139.52; 800-850 lbs (829) 135.83; 850-900 lbs (860) 134.12; 900-950 lbs (926) 131.29; 950-1000 lbs (981) 128.82. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (417) 162.09; 450-500 lbs (479) 158.01; 500-550 lbs (528) 149.34; 550-600 lbs (579) 146.29; 600-650 lbs (619) 143.96; 700-750 lbs (713) 135.42; 750-800 lbs (793) 134.35; 850-900 lbs (872) 127.04.
Missouri 21,800. 37 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 203.37; 350-400 lbs (374) 196.00; 400-450 lbs (428) 188.26; 450-500 lbs (475) 182.33; 500-550 lbs (525) 177.97; 550-600 lbs (576) 168.62; 600-650 lbs (620) 162.39; 650-700 lbs (671) 156.38; 700-750 lbs (731) 150.98; 750-800 lbs (764) 153.59; 800-850 lbs (844) 146.11; 850-900 lbs (887) 141.43; 900-950 lbs (915) 136.16; 950-1000 lbs (959) 129.95. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (324) 192.59; 350-400 lbs (371) 185.99; 400-450 lbs (428) 177.87; 450-500 lbs (477) 168.83; 500-550 lbs (519) 163.35; 550-600 lbs (573) 160.30; 600-650 lbs (610) 156.89; 650-700 lbs (675) 150.45; 700-750 lbs (723) 144.94; 750-800 lbs (782) 143.15; 800-850 lbs (829) 140.62; 850-900 lbs (892) 133.53; pkg 1030 lbs 130.00. Holsteins: Large 3 300-350 lbs (375) 127.19; 450-500 lbs (463) 129.86; 550-600 lbs (559) 131.25; 800-850 lbs (828) 98.01. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 177.04; 350-400 lbs (376) 178.52; 400-450 lbs (428) 166.86; 450-500 lbs (474) 159.31; 500-550 lbs (527) 152.52; 550-600 lbs (575) 149.06; 600-650 lbs (618) 144.53; 650-700 lbs (667) 143.74; 700-750 lbs (728) 136.08; 750-800 lbs (768) 133.07; 800-850 lbs (818) 131.95; 850-900 lbs (862) 128.79; 900-950 lbs (907) 125.15; 950-1000 lbs (965) 119.65. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (319) 175.23; 350-400 lbs (381) 167.44; 400-450 lbs (424) 158.57; 450-500 lbs (479) 152.70; 500-550 lbs (523) 148.68; 550-600 lbs (575) 142.52; 600-650 lbs (621) 145.87; 650-700 lbs (675) 141.50; 700-750 lbs (736) 134.77; 750-800 lbs (771) 126.15; 800-850 lbs (825) 127.10; 850-900 lbs (868) 128.64.
Arkansas 4000. 27 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (322) 202.76; 350-400 lbs (375) 190.76; 400-450 lbs (426) 182.98; 450-500 lbs (474) 176.21; 500-550 lbs (521) 170.69; 550-600 lbs (567) 160.20; 600-650 lbs (619) 152.73; 650-700 lbs (674) 147.44. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (317) 181.24; 350-400 lbs (375) 172.02; 400-450 lbs (425) 163.42; 450-500 lbs (471) 159.45; 500-550 lbs (525) 148.84; 550-600 lbs (573) 145.62; 600-650 lbs (624) 137.52.

 

logo
Friday, May 20, 2016 4:05 PM