Japan, United States Face Off In Crucial trade Negotiations

Japan and the United States began a round of crucial talks aimed at concluding a trade pact seen as critical to the success of regional negotiations, although officials warned that bridging differences would be difficult.

Tokyo and Washington are seeking a two-way trade deal, regarded as a key part of the U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that is the centrepiece of Washington’s push to increase its Asian presence, before U.S. President Barack Obama travels to Japan for an April 24-25 state visit.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has touted the multilateral framework as a key part of his growth strategy but the outlook for a Japan-U.S. deal is cloudy as both sides accuse each other of inflexibility. “I think if there is good will on both sides we can make progress on bridging our differences,” U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman told reporters before talks with officials including Economy Minister Akira Amari.

Working level discussions made little substantial progress in narrowing gaps, a Japanese government source said, and Froman’s talks with Amari were likely to continue. “The president’s visit is one important juncture, but it is not a deadline,” Japanese Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Hiroshige Seko told a news conference. “What is important is to achieve our country’s national interests.”

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Abe confirmed a basic trade agreement, overcoming sticking points on beef and autos that had threatened to stymie a deal, and agreed to work towards signing it as soon as possible. “Clearly we are looking for a level of ambition in TPP that is significantly higher than that,” Froman told reporters upon arriving in Japan.

Froman told U.S. lawmakers last week that Japan’s reluctance to lower trade barriers was holding up agreement on the TPP, a 12-nation grouping that would stretch from Asia to Latin America. Japanese officials say Washington needs to be more flexible on its side.

The United States wants Japan to open its rice, beef and pork, dairy and sugar sectors - politically powerful sectors that Abe has vowed to defend. Japan wants a timetable on U.S. promises to drop tariffs of 2.5 percent on imports of passenger cars and 25 percent on light trucks.

Abe called for flexibility and said he hoped that both parties would end up feeling that they were in a mutually beneficial situation, as with the Japan-Australia agreement. “I think we can say Japan and the United States are dominant among parties participating in TPP talks in terms of economy,” he told Japanese television.

“If Japan and the United States fail to reach an agreement, TPP could collapse... The important thing is that it would be pointless if Japan and the United States remained unyielding and that happened.”

Graham Receives Texas A&M AgriLife Distinguished Texan Award

San Antonio – Dr. Charles W. Graham has received the Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award from Texas A&M AgriLife – the highest individual honor given to individuals demonstrating outstanding leadership and providing significant contributions to Texas agriculture.

Graham received the award at the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association Convention in San Antonio April 6. “Dr. Graham exemplifies what the Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award is all about,” said Dr. Mark Hussey, interim president of Texas A&M University. Hussey was the vice chancellor and dean of agriculture when Graham was selected as the honoree.

“He’s the only individual to serve as president of both the Texas Quarter Horse Association and the Texas Thoroughbred Breeders Association. He’s a legend among those in the equine industry, having established equine veterinarian facilities that are recognized among the nation’s most prominent. He also has successful cattle and feedlot operations in addition to other agricultural interests. We are proud to recognize Dr. Graham for his contributions to Texas agriculture and Texas A&M.”

“Dr. Graham is most deserving of this award,” said Dr. Bill Dugas, acting vice chancellor and dean. “He has served on several committees through the years and has assisted many of our students as they have learned more about the animal science profession through first-hand tours at his equine and beef facilities. We are deeply honored to recognize Dr. Graham for these contributions.”

Graham earned his bachelor of science degree in animal husbandry in 1953, his bachelor of science degree in animal science in 1954 and his doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1961, all from Texas A&M.

In the early 1960s, Graham and Dr. W. H. Cardwell built the Elgin Veterinary Hospital and grew the practice into one of the largest equine veterinary facilities in the nation. Graham is now owner of a number of other businesses, including the 1,300-acre Southwest Stallion Station in Elgin, which has bred some of the top stallions and broodmares in the quarter horse industry.

The numerous awards Graham has received include the 2010 Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Science Outstanding Alumni and his 2009 induction into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame. He is the only individual to be selected Horseman of the Year by both the Texas Quarter Horse Association and the Texas Thoroughbred Breeders Association. He also has been named Outstanding Alumnus of Texas A&M’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

Graham has served on the board of directors of the Elgin Independent School District and as a member of the Elgin Kiwanis Club and the Thorndale Masonic Lodge. He participates in numerous stock show events to support youth involved in 4-H, FFA and other agricultural organizations. In 2005, the Star of Texas Rodeo of Austin named their new offices for Graham.

Voting For State Beef Checkoff Program Set For June 2-6

Austin, Texas – At the request of Texas cattle industry associations, and in accordance with Texas law, the Texas Department of Agriculture will conduct a producer referendum that, if approved, would create a state beef checkoff program for beef promotion, marketing, research and consumer education. This proposed program, to be called the Texas Beef Checkoff, would be funded and managed by Texas beef producers.

Voting will take place June 2 through June 6, 2014, to approve a refundable maximum assessment of $1 per head of cattle to fund this program. If approved, the assessment will be collected at each point of ownership transfer in Texas.

Eligible producers can vote at any Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service county office during each office’s regular business hours. Eligible producers are strongly encouraged to vote in person.

If an eligible producer is unable to access an extension service office, a mail-in ballot may be requested from TDA between May 19 and June 2, 2014. Mail-in ballots must be postmarked no later than close of business Friday, June 6, 2014, in order to be counted.

The Texas Beef Checkoff would be funded solely through this assessment on cattle. It is not paid for by taxpayer dollars and is not a government program. If approved, any assessments collected would be refundable upon request.

The program would be managed by Texas cattlemen and women serving on the Beef Promotion and Research Council of Texas.

Any producer regardless of age who has owned cattle in Texas anytime between June 6, 2013, and June 6, 2014, is eligible to vote. Youth younger than 16 years of age must have a parent or guardian co-sign their ballot.

If approved, collection of the assessment will begin October 1, 2014.

For more information about the Texas Beef Checkoff and the referendum, including voting locations and hours, visit www.texasagriculture.gov.

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 57,900

Texas 30,200. 73 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1FOB Current 750-775 lbs 176.03; May 750-775 lbs 176.25; 800 lbs 175.65; June 750 lbs 179.80; July 625 lbs 189.50; Aug 600 lbs 191.50; Sept 750 lbs 180.45; Oct 750 lbs 179.00; Delivered Current 720-725 lbs 180.93; 765 lbs 179.00; 800-825 lbs 166.48; May 800 lbs 176.50; June 675 lbs 178.80; 825 lbs 176.45; July 750 lbs 180.50; Aug 600 lbs 193.65; 700 lbs 186.30; 750-775 lbs 180.13; 800-825 lbs 177.50; Sept 800-825 lbs 177.20; Oct 800 lbs 178.30. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725-745 lbs 175.58; 750-755 lbs 173.19; 835 lbs 163.00; Delivered Current 525 lbs 188.00; 625 lbs 178.00 Mexican Origin; 715-740 lbs 174.04; 765-785 lbs 175.75; 800-835 lbs 170.48; 850-855 lbs 171.29; May 725 lbs 172.00 Mexican Origin; 775-785 lbs 175.16; 800 lbs 174.21; June 725 lbs 183.00; July 725 lbs 182.50; 750 lbs 178.50. Medium and Large 2 FOB Current 740 lbs 161.15. Holsteins: Large 3 Delivered May 800 lbs 127.75; June 325 lbs 189.50; 800 lbs 127.75; July 325 lbs 188.00; Aug 325 lbs 187.47; Sept 325 lbs 187.47; 550 lbs 158.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 665 lbs 173.95; 700 lbs 170.36; 800 lbs 155.33; May 550 lbs 187.00; 675 lbs 174.50; 700-725 lbs 171.12; June 700 lbs 172.90; July 625 lbs 178.75; 650-675 lbs 176.12; 700-725 lbs 172.78; Aug 600 lbs 181.65; Nov 725 lbs 171.85; Delivered Current 700-725 lbs 171.10; May 700-725 lbs 172.03; June 700-725 lbs 174.70; 750 lbs 173.60; July 650 lbs 177.95; 700-725 lbs 175.24; Aug 700-725 lbs 174.68; 750 lbs 174.60; Sept 725 lbs 174.35. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725 lbs 163.90; Delivered Current 600 lbs 168.00 Mexican Origin; 675 lbs 170.27; 700-725 lbs 169.04; 750 lbs 164.00; June 725 lbs 173.00.

Oklahoma 8300. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 66 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 800-825 lbs 169.72; 850 lbs 165.50; Aug 700 lbs 183.30; Delivered Current 725 lbs 182.50; 750-790 lbs 174.10; 825 lbs 169.00; 950 lbs 154.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 575 lbs 192.30; 820-825 lbs 165.65; June 675 lbs 175.80; 825 lbs 174.45; July 750 lbs 178.50; Aug 775 lbs 176.60; 800-825 lbs 174.78; Sept 800-825 lbs 174.74; Delivered Current 825 lbs 165.50. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 725 lbs 164.71; May 725 lbs 170.30; July 700-725 lbs 172.69; Aug 700-725 lbs 172.93; Sept 725 lbs 171.35; Delivered Current 780 lbs 160.00. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725 lbs 162.50. Medium and Large 2 FOB Current 570 lbs 173.30.

New Mexico 600. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 59 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 800 lbs 163.00; May 800 lbs 174.80. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB July 700 lbs 173.45.

Kansas 6800. 83 pct over 600 lbs. 18 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 775 lbs 179.00; 825 lbs 171.00 (12 cent slide); 860 lbs 166.00; Contracts: July 825 lbs 174.50; Sept 900 lbs 168.50; Oct 900 lbs 168.00. Delivered Basis: Medium and Large 1-2 575 lbs 196.00; 700-750 lbs 172.75181.00; 800-830 lbs 170.00-174.00. Holsteins: Large 3 725 lbs 134.50; 800 lbs 136.00; Contracts: May 800 lbs 127.75; June 800 lbs 127.75; Aug 550 lbs 159.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 650 lbs 186.00; 750 lbs 171.00; Contracts: June 700-725 lbs 171.00-173.25; July 725 lbs 169.00. Delivered Basis: Medium and Large 1 750 lbs 172.50; Aug 750 lbs 172.50; Sept 750 lbs 172.50; Oct 750 lbs 175.50. Medium and Large 1-2 570 lbs 177.00.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — April 11
National feeder cattle receipts: 188,600

Feeder cattle and calves sold unevenly steady with the majority of sales ranging from $3 higher to $3 lower. Most pressure was seen on heavyweight feeders over 800 lbs and soft new-crop calves that are progressively making up a larger percentage of receipts. As a whole, offerings are currently less attractive than usual with receipts mostly made up of growing-lot yearlings and fall-born calves, both carrying considerable flesh. True grass-ready stocker cattle (where available) still brought top billing, but these cattle are getting harder to find with every passing day and are rarely plentiful enough to test the market. Perhaps feeder markets have reached the point of topping or even tipping as the word “lower” reared its ugly heady on market reports across the country for the first time in months. Nationwide auction receipts were 17 percent lighter than a year ago as available supplies are exhausting right in accordance with most buyer needs being met. However, it would be difficult to call demand any lighter and crowds were reportedly sizeable in the few major auction markets that had a good run this week. One of these was Torrington, WY, where a package of little 288 lb steer calves brought $3/lb and a short load of 699 lb replacement quality heifers sold for $193 or about $1350 per head. Spring weather has finally reached most corners of our nation and pastures are greening up nicely. Corn planters were rolling across southern edges of the Corn Belt with early-bird farmers gambling an early stand against the threat of rain-out and replanting. Fed cattle trade was very slow to develop this week with packers facing a short-bought position and lower cut-out values at the same time. But, many major population areas are finally looking forward to a weekend with favorable grilling conditions which should support dressed beef values. This week’s reported auction volume included 51 percent over 600 lbs and 43 percent heifers.

Texas 4600. 67 pct over 600 lbs. 27 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (377) 247.34; 400-450 lbs (416) 236.23; 450-500 lbs (467) 226.36; 500-550 lbs (521) 225.99; 550-600 lbs (569) 217.57; 600-650 lbs (622) 200.96; 650-700 lbs (670) 185.70; 700-750 lbs (726) 185.84; 750-800 lbs (772) 175.83; 800-850 lbs (824) 166.51; Couple Loads 860 lbs 160.50. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (480) 236.13; 500-550 lbs (527) 219.01; 550-600 lbs (571) 205.20; 600-650 lbs (618) 183.83; 650-700 lbs (675) 178.76; 700-750 lbs (728) 173.60; 750-800 lbs (763) 174.88; 800-850 lbs (807) 164.12. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (373) 224.78; 400-450 lbs (436) 211.17; 450-500 lbs (477) 207.75; 500-550 lbs (529) 196.00; 550-600 lbs (576) 182.55; 600-650 lbs (625) 176.66; 700-750 lbs (722) 162.74; 750-800 lbs (772) 157.60. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (385) 216.43; 550-600 lbs (582) 174.97; 600-650 lbs (609) 175.39; 800-850 lbs (807) 150.28.

Oklahoma 20,000. 70 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (276) 281.31; 300-350 lbs (323) 254.37; 350-400 lbs (373) 248.07; 400-450 lbs (426) 237.93; 450-500 lbs (470) 232.08; 500-550 lbs (525) 218.43; 550-600 lbs (572) 210.29; 600-650 lbs (620) 202.92; 650-700 lbs (668) 193.67; 700-750 lbs (727) 180.60; 750-800 lbs (767) 175.69; 800-850 lbs (830) 168.34; 850-900 lbs (876) 162.99; 900-950 lbs (930) 158.15; 950-1000 lbs (975) 151.94; 1000-1050 lbs (1010) 153.50. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (369) 223.27; 450-500 lbs (484) 218.62; 500-550 lbs (530) 208.77; 550-600 lbs (577) 193.79; 600-650 lbs (633) 192.93; 650-700 lbs (678) 182.22; 700-750 lbs (728) 175.10; 750-800 lbs (778) 169.11; 850-900 lbs (888) 157.26; 900-950 lbs (924) 154.33; 950-1000 lbs (965) 153.11. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (326) 228.90; 350-400 lbs (377) 220.25; 400-450 lbs (426) 209.10; 450-500 lbs (477) 206.03; 500-550 lbs (523) 195.74; 550-600 lbs (572) 188.88; 600-650 lbs (630) 181.80; 650-700 lbs (675) 173.37; 700-750 lbs (727) 168.02; 750-800 lbs (773) 161.25; 800-850 lbs (824) 154.84; 850-900 lbs (862) 149.80; 900-950 lbs (909) 146.40. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (421) 202.78; 450-500 lbs (479) 198.38; 500-550 lbs (525) 187.90; 550-600 lbs (581) 181.85; 600-650 lbs (615) 175.92; 650-700 lbs (683) 166.86; 700-750 lbs (722) 161.22; 750-800 lbs (778) 154.78; 800-850 lbs (823) 148.81; 850-900 lbs (859) 147.40.

New Mexico 2900. 42 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (374) 241.59; 400-450 lbs (437) 231.91; 450-500 lbs (474) 217.67; 500-550 lbs (534) 208.36; 550-600 lbs (570) 201.76; 600-650 lbs (611) 192.78; 650-700 lbs (682) 185.26; 700-750 lbs (729) 175.92; 750-800 lbs (793) 171.73. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (376) 235.82; 400-450 lbs (436) 219.81; 450-500 lbs (463) 211.25; 650-700 lbs (678) 177.73. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (378) 220.05; 400-450 lbs (433) 214.01; 450-500 lbs (475) 204.18; 500-550 lbs (530) 195.86; 550-600 lbs (578) 188.47; 650-700 lbs (673) 170.13; 700-750 lbs (713) 164.80; 750-800 lbs (764) 164.34. Medium and Large 1-2 550-600 lbs (573) 184.89; 650-700 lbs (666) 168.47.

Kansas 12,600. 80 pct over 600 lbs. 40 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 255 lbs 295.00; 300-350 lbs (325) 271.52; 400-450 lbs (415) 245.07; 450-500 lbs (471) 234.77; 500-550 lbs (523) 217.67; 550-600 lbs (572) 220.88; 600-650 lbs (608) 210.63; 650-700 lbs (659) 195.39; 700-750 lbs (721) 187.18; 750-800 lbs (776) 174.98; 800-850 lbs (825) 170.32; 850-900 lbs (866) 166.37; 900-950 lbs (927) 158.51; 950-1000 lbs (973) 152.84; 1000-1050 lbs (1022) 151.02. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (435) 233.14; 450-500 lbs (480) 223.52; 500-550 lbs (523) 216.65; 550-600 lbs (581) 206.22; 600-650 lbs (621) 200.24; 650-700 lbs (681) 188.99; 700-750 lbs (729) 181.02; 750-800 lbs (769) 168.86; 800-850 lbs (833) 167.42; 850-900 lbs (895) 157.75; load 920 lbs 152.25. Holsteins: Large 3 part load 760 lbs 133.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 pkg 255 lbs 258.00; 300-350 lbs (315) 248.88; 350-400 lbs (383) 222.61; 450-500 lbs (467) 201.20; 500-550 lbs (513) 197.80; 550-600 lbs (567) 189.80; 600-650 lbs (618) 184.32; 650-700 lbs (675) 174.66; 700-750 lbs (721) 168.63; 750-800 lbs (762) 163.49; 800-850 lbs (821) 155.02; 850-900 lbs (858) 150.07; half load 965 lbs 145.00. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (422) 206.30; 450-500 lbs (474) 200.77; 500-550 lbs (536) 190.37; 550-600 lbs (568) 180.89; 600-650 lbs (635) 175.30; 650-700 lbs (686) 170.19; 700-750 lbs (735) 162.92; 750-800 lbs (771) 160.03; 800-850 lbs (827) 152.11; 850-900 lbs (877) 149.20.

Missouri 28,000. 36 pct over 600 lbs. 39 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (280) 252.31; 300-350 lbs (328) 250.37; 350-400 lbs (375) 240.34; 400-450 lbs (426) 236.16; 450-500 lbs (473) 228.49; 500-550 lbs (525) 221.73; 550-600 lbs (576) 214.28; 600-650 lbs (622) 204.14; 650-700 lbs (671) 195.01; 700-750 lbs (734) 182.94; 750-800 lbs (773) 178.97; 800-850 lbs (812) 173.66; 850-900 lbs (875) 167.22; 900-950 lbs (918) 160.84; 950-1000 lbs (960) 162.40. Medium and Large 1-2 250-300 lbs (280) 247.98; 300-350 lbs (329) 231.80; 350-400 lbs (376) 229.49; 400-450 lbs (425) 223.76; 450-500 lbs (476) 217.43; 500-550 lbs (526) 210.26; 550-600 lbs (572) 200.18; 600-650 lbs (627) 192.00; 650-700 lbs (673) 180.52; 700-750 lbs (721) 174.67; 750-800 lbs (777) 170.87; 800-850 lbs (822) 165.61; 850-900 lbs (862) 159.01; 900-950 lbs (939) 151.64. Holsteins: Large 3 250-300 lbs (286) 168.54; 300-350 lbs (335) 162.34; 350-400 lbs (376) 154.89; 400-450 lbs (435) 152.01; 450-500 lbs (464) 150.14; 500-550 lbs (522) 147.84; 550-600 lbs (569) 144.43; 650-700 lbs (678) 129.85; 700-750 lbs (730) 133.51; 750-800 lbs (767) 134.10; pkg 810 lbs 136.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 250-300 lbs (272) 236.51; 300-350 lbs (327) 232.01; 350-400 lbs (374) 221.71; 400-450 lbs (424) 215.18; 450-500 lbs (471) 206.97; 500-550 lbs (519) 200.47; 550-600 lbs (571) 191.91; 600-650 lbs (623) 182.66; 650-700 lbs (666) 177.99; 700-750 lbs (723) 171.58; 750-800 lbs (761) 165.42; 800-850 lbs (810) 151.48; 850-900 lbs (864) 146.03; 900-950 lbs (929) 139.60. Medium and Large 1-2 250-300 lbs (281) 224.98; 300-350 lbs (323) 218.09; 350-400 lbs (373) 211.04; 400-450 lbs (424) 204.46; 450-500 lbs (478) 196.24; 500-550 lbs (523) 189.92; 550-600 lbs (574) 184.25; 600-650 lbs (622) 172.88; 650-700 lbs (671) 171.87; 700-750 lbs (721) 163.93; 750-800 lbs (773) 151.84; 800-850 lbs (832) 150.66; load 875 lbs 145.36.

Arkansas 5900. 27 pct over 600 lbs. 42 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (325) 255.38; 350-400 lbs (373) 241.93; 400-450 lbs (424) 229.08; 450-500 lbs (476) 220.75; 500-550 lbs (523) 211.64; 550-600 lbs (567) 203.01; 600-650 lbs (622) 192.57; 650-700 lbs (669) 186.03. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (328) 224..14 350-400 lbs (375) 216.93; 400-450 lbs (425) 210.37; 450-500 lbs (470) 206.33; 500-550 lbs (524) 194.89; 550-600 lbs (573) 185.34; 600-650 lbs (620) 175.93; 650-700 lbs (670) 172.92.

 

 

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Thursday, April 17, 2014 3:32 PM