Committee Recommends Americans Eat Less Red, Processed Meats

By Jerry Hagstrom
DTN Political Correspondent and
Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Omaha (DTN) – Groups representing the meat industry were ready to pounce when the long-awaited report by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee came out.

As feared by the meat industry, the committee’s report downplays the health role of lean meat in a diet while also advising Americans to reduce eating red and processed meat, refined grains, added sugars and sodium. The report also recommended replacing solid animal fats with vegetable oils and nuts.

Such a recommendation to cut consumption of red and processed meats is anathema to the meat industry, which invests millions of dollars each in year in research and promotion to get consumers to eat more beef and pork.

The North American Meat Institute pointed out that the term “lean meat” had been moved from being a recommended food to being a footnote in the committee’s recommendations. The committee noted, “As lean meats were not consistently defined or handled similarly between studies, they were not identified as a common characteristic across the reviews. However, as demonstrated in the food pattern modeling of the healthy U.S.-style and healthy Mediterranean-style patterns, lean meats can be a part of a healthy dietary pattern.”

The meat institute stated the committee “ignores the countless studies and data that the committee reviewed for the last two years that showed unequivocally that meat and poultry are among the most nutrient-dense foods available. Nutrient-dense lean meat is a headline, not a footnote.”

The committee’s report upholds the notion of a healthy Mediterranean diet. NAMI pointed out the contradiction there. “The committee’s contradictory advice to reduce processed meats is also nonsensical, especially given data the committee reviewed about the Mediterranean diet.”

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association offered similar criticism. Shalene McNeill, a registered dietitian with NCBA, said the recommendation lowering red meat consumption is not consistent with scientific evidence and would be unsound dietary advice.

“Lean meat is red meat. Today’s beef supply is leaner than ever before with more than 30 cuts of beef recognized as lean by government standards,” McNeill said. “The protein foods category, which includes meat, is the only category currently consumed within the current guidelines, and it is misleading to conclude that a healthy dietary pattern should be lower in red meat.”

The report recommended adopting a “healthy” U.S., Mediterranean-style or vegetarian diet that is higher in plant-based foods, such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds, and lower in calories and meat. The meat industry disputed that interpretation on meat consumption in a Mediterranean diet.

The report, though, also showed how dietary advice can change over time. The dietary committee chose to drop the long-standing recommendation that cholesterol intake be limited to no more than 300 mg per day. That decision is likely to please the egg and meat industries, but has also raised questions about whether Americans can trust the government’s dietary guidance since government and private medical experts have recommended reducing cholesterol for years.

But the committee said that the latest scientific research had changed their minds. “Available evidence shows no appreciable relationship between consumption of dietary cholesterol and serum cholesterol,” the committee said, concluding “cholesterol is not a nutrient of concern for overconsumption.”

The dietary committee’s report also recommended local, state and federal governments to create incentives for healthy eating lifestyles. Regarding disincentives for certain foods, the committee recommended taxing foods with higher sugar and sodium levels.

The report, written by 14 nationally recognized experts in the fields of nutrition, medicine and public health, will be used by USDA and HHS in writing the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

USDA and HHS officials have emphasized for weeks that the report is only advisory. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Syliva Burwell will make the final decisions on the dietary guidelines after receiving input from other federal agencies and comments from the public. “Now that the advisory committee has completed its recommendations, HHS and USDA will review this advisory report, along with comments from the public – including other experts – and input from other federal agencies as we begin the process of updating the guidelines,” the two secretaries stated in a joint news release.

The dietary guidelines are likely to be complete near the end of 2015. USDA is expected to use those guidelines to revise the My Plate system to communicate the recommendations in 2016.

CONTROVERSIAL RECOMMENDATIONS
The committee recommends the government encourage Americans to reduce consumption of sodium, saturated fats and added sugars and to take the sustainability of food production into consideration when making food choices.
It also recommended that the government “align food assistance programs such as SNAP and WIC with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.”
WIC – the special nutrition assistance program for women, infants and children – is already supposed to follow the dietary guidelines, but the recommendation raises the controversial question of whether food purchases under SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, should be limited to healthier foods.
The recommendations on meat, sodium, added sugars and sustainability are bound to cause controversy.
The fiscal year 2015 omnibus appropriations bill has already halted regulations under the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act that call for continued reductions in sodium in school meals. The same law contained report language indicating that Congress expects Vilsack to stop any inclusion of sustainability language in the dietary guidelines on the grounds that the subject of sustainability is not appropriate for the guidelines on what Americans should eat.

GENERAL CONCLUSIONS
The report is important because it will guide government policy, but most of the basis for the report and the conclusions the scientists reached are already well known.
The committee, which disbanded upon the release of the report, said its work was “guided by two fundamental realities.”
“First, about half of all American adults – 117 million individuals – have one or more preventable, chronic diseases, and about two-thirds of U.S. adult – nearly 155 million individuals – are overweight or obese.”
The committee added, “These conditions have been highly prevalent for more than two decades. Poor dietary patterns, overconsumption of calories, and physical inactivity directly contribute to these disorders.”
The DGAC found that Americans do not consume enough vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin C, folate, calcium, magnesium, fiber or potassium. Certain parts of the population such as infants, adolescents or the elderly also are not getting enough other nutrients in their diets either.
The DGAC also found that Americans eat too much sodium and saturated fat relative to the tolerable upper intake level set by the Institute of Medicine. The consumption of refined grains and added sugars is too high.
“The data suggest cautious optimism about dietary intake of the youngest members of the U.S. population because many young children ages 2 to 5 years consume recommended amounts of fruit and dairy,” the report added.

SUSTAINABLE DIET
In yet another area of controversy, the committee concluded that Americans should be concerned about a “sustainable diet” in order to assure a food supply in the future.
“Current evidence shows that the average U.S. diet has a larger environmental impact in terms of increased greenhouse gas emissions, land use, water use, and energy use, compared to the above dietary patterns,” the report said.
“This is because the current U.S. population intake of animal-based foods is higher and plant-based foods are lower, than proposed in these three dietary patterns. Of note is that no food groups need to be eliminated completely to improve sustainability outcomes over the current status.”
The committee also said a “moderate amount of seafood is an important component of two of three of these dietary patterns, and has demonstrated health benefits.”
It added, “The seafood industry is in the midst of expansion to meet worldwide demand” and that “both farm-raised and wild-caught seafood will be needed.” “The environmental impact of food production is considerable and if natural resources such as land, water and energy are not conserved and managed optimally, they will be strained and potentially lost,” the report said.

Climate change, shifts in population dietary patterns and demand for food products, energy costs, and population growth will continue to put additional pressures on available natural resources, the committee stated. “Meeting current and future food needs will depend on two concurrent approaches: altering individual and population dietary choices and patterns and developing agricultural and production practices that reduce environmental impacts and conserve resources, while still meeting food and nutrition needs.

The full dietary guidelines report can be read at www.DietaryGuidelines.gov.

Packer Ban Debate In Nebraska Packers Could Own Livestock

By Chris Clayton
DTN Ag Policy Editor

Lincoln, Neb. (DTN) – Nebraska is considered the nation’s top red-meat producing state, but it’s also one of the final bastions of major livestock production where meatpacking companies aren’t allowed to own livestock.

A bill in the state’s unicameral legislature would change that, at least for hogs. The bill was introduced by state Sen. Ken Schilz, a former cattle feedyard operator from western Nebraska, who also sought a similar change last year in a bill that got bottled up in committee. Schilz reintroduced a bill this year that would specifically allow farmers to raise livestock owned by a meatpacking company.

At a hearing, Schilz told fellow state senators that Nebraska lags behind neighboring states in hog finishing units. Nebraska hog farmers are generally farrowing pigs then sending a large share of those feeders out of state for other farmers to grow to market weight. “We are hauling hogs out of the state at the expense of our producers,” Schilz said at a hearing.

The hogs then, in some instances, are shipped back to Nebraska for slaughter at one of the state’s three major pork-processing facilities.

The debate about a packer ban on ownership of livestock may be somewhat unique in 2015. Most major livestock states have gotten rid of such bans. Neighboring Iowa had a similar ban for nearly three decades until it was ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge 12 years ago, prompting Iowa officials to settle with packers a decade ago.

Nebraska law specifically outlaws packers directly or indirectly owning, keeping or feeding livestock. Larry Sitzman, executive director of the Nebraska Pork Producers Association, said he could not find another state that has a law banning packer ownership of livestock. “I really don’t know the answer to that, but my sense is nobody does – an official legislative ban,” Sitzman said.

BILL LIMITED TO PORK PRODUCTION
In a state where there are three cattle for every person, Schilz’s legislation is limited to allow the corporate ownership of hogs. Schilz noted at the hearing that the bill is limited to pork production mainly because the hog industry is more vertically integrated than the cattle industry.
“Personally, it shouldn’t matter but understanding a compromise here, the cattle industry doesn’t want it and I respect that,” Schilz said.
The Nebraska Cattlemen did not testify on the bill and the group remains neutral on the bill. There apparently remain enough opponents to packer ownership in Nebraska’s cattle industry to cause cattle producers to stay out of the argument.
“There is a faction in the cattle industry that does not want that,” Sitzman said. “Our organization is more united and has come to facts that you heard in the hearing – we need it.”
The percentage of hogs fed under production contracts nationally rose from 5% in 1992 to 71% by 2009, according to a 2013 USDA Economic Research Service report. Pork production overall has grown nationally since then, but the number of actual hog farmers has fallen by 70%. The industry continues to become more vertically integrated.
Supporters of the bill told lawmakers it is much easier to finance confinement buildings if a producer has a long-term feeding contract. A 3,600-head unit can cost $725,000, while a 7,200-head facility can run $1.1 million or more. Steve Stanton, who works for Rabo AgriFinance in Iowa, told Nebraska lawmakers lenders support those contract agreements. Often the pork integrator will pay the lender directly for the farm operation.
“It’s a very competitive business in Iowa to find pig space,” Stanton said.

CONTRACT FEEDING IS ANOTHER TOOL
Scott Pilker, a vice president for the Nebraska Pork Producers Association, said contract feeding for packers would simply translate into “just another tool in the toolbox” for producers to use. “I’m all for expansion by any means,” Pilker said.
Two Iowa producers testified in Nebraska; they feed for Murphy-Brown, a subsidiary of Smithfield Foods. The producers said they provide the labor and the buildings, but Murphy-Brown provides the pigs, the feed and veterinary care for the hogs. Those producers also said they are satisfied with the arrangements and income for their work.
Nebraska hasn’t seen the same production gains in pork that other neighboring states have seen despite having three major pork-processing facilities in the state. Nebraska has 405,000 breeding sows, ranking it sixth in the nation in sow herds, according to the latest USDA quarterly hogs report. Nebraska also is sixth in market hogs at just under 2.7 million.
Nebraska’s sow herd has increased by about 45,000 head since 2000, but the state’s number of market hogs is nearly the same as 15 years ago at 3.1 million head.
Other states, notably Iowa and Minnesota, have seen their overall herds of market hogs steadily grow since 2000. Iowa saw its market hogs go from 14.2 million to nearly 19.9 million head at the end of 2014. Minnesota’s market-hog production has gone up 2.1 million head to 7.29 million. Kansas, another neighboring state with no ban on packer ownership, produces 1.4 million market hogs now, about 230,000 hogs more than it did in 2000.
Regardless of the ownership laws, other major pork-producing states saw the number of hog farmers decline from the 2007 to 2012 Ag Census. Iowa dropped from 8,330 to 6,266 hog farmers from 2007 to 2012 even though the state raises more than 1.1 million more hogs per year. Minnesota saw the number of hog farmers decline from 4,382 to 3,355 over that span.
Nebraska had 2,213 hog farmers in 2007, but that number declined by 33% to 1,476 by the 2012 Ag Census. Neighboring Kansas, which has no ban on packer ownership, also saw a decline of 30%, or a loss of 450 hog farms from 2007 to 2012.
Cattle production in Nebraska bucked the trend. From 2007 to 2012, the state actually added more than 1,850 cattle operations. The growth was mainly through farms that had 50 or fewer head. Kansas, which has a comparable number of cattle, saw the number of farms with cattle fall by about 2,400 operations over that time. Iowa also saw the number of cattle operations decline by about 2,800 producers.

SOME OPPOSITION TO THE BILL
The hearing in Lincoln had seven proponents testify to get rid of the packer ban while 15 opponents testified against it. Still, John Hansen, president of the Nebraska Farmers Union, said it will be tougher to bottle up the bill in committee this year because of changes an the Legislature’s Agriculture Committee.
“In our view it solves no known problem,” Hansen said of the legislation.
Hansen said the primary problem is a lack of a profitable market for independent producers. Hansen noted hog markets are already too heavily dominated with captive supplies of livestock. It’s not more helpful to raise more hogs in the state if that translates into fewer producers in the process, he said.
“The captive supply part of the deal will not make what’s left of the market any better,” he said. “You don’t do any damage to the one producer who gets a contract, but you can do pretty substantial damage to other producers who don’t want to be dependent on a packer contract. You make their situation worse. So how much at the end of the day do you help and how much do you make things worse?”
Hansen pointed to Nebraska’s rank overall as the top red-meat producing state in the nation. On a per-capita basis, Hansen said Nebraska has far more people involved in the livestock business than do other major red-meat producing states such as Texas or Kansas, Hansen said.

“It’s hard to look at that and say, ‘Gosh, things are really working badly in Nebraska.”’ The Nebraska Farm Bureau, Nebraska Corn Growers Association and Nebraska Soybean Association all back the bill. The pork association’s Sitzman believes the bill has enough support to lift the ban on packer ownership for hogs. “We’re fairly confident it will be successful this year,” Sitzman said.

2015 Houston Stock Show Schedule Of Events

TUESDAY, MARCH 3
8:00 a.m. – Maine Anjou Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West Side)
8:00 a.m. – Braunvieh, Braunvieh Beef Builder Shows – NRG Center – Main Arena (East Side)
8:00 a.m. – Grade All Breeds Range Bulls and Commercial Females – NRG Arena Sales Pavilion
9:00 a.m. – Weigh/Measure Lowline Angus – NRG Center – Back Dock
10:30 a.m. – Charolais Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West Side)
10:30 a.m. – Red Angus Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East Side)
1:30 p.m. – Weigh and Measure International Brahman Cattle – NRG Center – Main Arena
2:00 p.m. – Lowline Moderator Bull Battle – NRG Center – East Arena
5:00 p.m. – Lowline Cattle Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
7:00 p.m. – Simbrah/Simmental Cattle Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4
8:00 a.m. – Simbrah Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West Side)
8:00 a.m. – Angus Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East Side)
8:00 a.m. – Youth Dairy Goat Showmanship – NRG Center - East Arena (East side)
8:00 a.m. – Youth Boer Goat Showmanship – NRG Center – East Arena (West side)
9:00 a.m. – Youth Dairy Goat Show – NRG Center - East Arena (East side)
9:00 a.m. – Youth Boer Goat Show – NRG Center – East Arena (West side)
9:00 a.m. – 48th Annual All Breed Commercial Sale – NRG Arena Sales Pavilion
11:30 a.m. – Simmental Show –NRG Center – Main Arena (West Side)
11:30 a.m. – Lowline Angus Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
6:30 p.m. – International Brahman Cattle Sale – NRG Arena Sales Pavilion
THURSDAY, MARCH 5
8:00 a.m. – Brahman Show (Females) – NRG Center – Main Arena
8:00 a.m. – Open Dairy Goat Show – NRG Center – East Arena (East side)
8:00 a.m. – Open Boer Goat Show – NRG Center – East Arena (West side)
12:00 Noon – Weigh and Measure Brangus – NRG Center – Back Dock
4:00 p.m. – American Red Brangus Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
4:00 p.m. – Shorthorn – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
FRIDAY, MARCH 6
8:00 a.m. – Brahman Show (Bulls) – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
8:00 a.m. – International Brangus (Bulls) – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
8:00 a.m. – Weigh and Measure Braford – NRG Center – Back Dock
8:00 a.m. – South Texas Beefmaster Magic XV Cattle Sale – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
10:00 a.m. – Youth Meat Pen Show – NRG Arena – Hall B
1:00 p.m. – Beefmaster Cattle Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
1:00 p.m. – International Brangus Show (Females) – NRG Center – Main Arena (East Side)
1:00 p.m. – South Texas Beefmaster Cattle Futurity and Classic Sale – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
SATURDAY, MARCH 7
8:00 a.m. – Junior Breeding Gilt Show – NRG Center – East Arena
8:00 a.m. – Youth Rabbit Show – NRG Arena – Hall B
1:00 p.m. – Braford Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
1:00 p.m. – Santa Gertrudis Cattle Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
4:00 p.m. – Braford F-1 Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
5:00 p.m. – Beefmaster Promotional Group Haltered Cattle Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
7:30 p.m. – International Brangus Association Cattle Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
8:00 a.m. – Junior Breeding Sheep Show – NRG Center – East Arena
8:00 a.m. – Limousin Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
8:00 a.m. – Youth Texas Longhorn Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
8:00 a.m. – Youth Rabbit Show – NRG Arena – Hall B
10:30 a.m. – Junior Commercial Steer Weigh and Grade – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
12:30 p.m. – Open Texas Longhorn Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
3:00 p.m. – Texas Longhorn Trophy Steer Showdown – NRG Center – Main Arena
MONDAY, MARCH 9
8:00 a.m. – Hereford/Polled Hereford Show –NRG Center – Main Arena (West Side)
8:00 a.m. – ITLA Longhorn Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
8:00 a.m. – Open Breeding Sheep Show – NRG Center – East Arena
10:00 a.m. – Weigh & Measure Miniature Herefords – NRG Center – Back Dock
1:00 p.m. – Open & Youth Dexter Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
1:00 p.m. – AMZA Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
2:00 p.m. – Junior Commercial Steer Sale – NRG Arena - Sales Pavilion
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
8:00 a.m. – Miniature Zebu Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West Side)
8:00 a.m. – Miniature Hereford Pre-Junior & Junior Shows and Showmanship –
NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
8:00 a.m. – Ultrasound Wagyu – NRG Center – Back Dock
7:00 p.m. – MHBA Mini Hereford Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
8:00 a.m. – Open Miniature Hereford – NRG Center – Main Arena (West side)
8:00 a.m. – Texas Wagyu Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (East side)
THURSDAY, MARCH 12
8:30 a.m. – Junior Market Lamb Show – NRG Center – East Arena (East Side)
8:30 a.m. – Junior Market Goat Show – NRG Center – East Arena (West Side)
FRIDAY, MARCH 13
8:00 a.m. – Junior Market Lamb Show – NRG Center – East Arena (East Side)
8:00 a.m. – Junior Market Goat Show – NRG Center – East Arena (West Side)
8:00 a.m. – Calf Scramble Beef Heifer Show – NRG Center – Main Arena
(East - British/European; West - American)
10:00 a.m. – Junior Breeding Beef Heifer Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (West – Beefmaster, Red Brahman); (East – Maine-Anjou, Red Angus, Polled Hereford)
SATURDAY, MARCH 14
9:30 a.m. – Open Breeding Rabbit and Cavy Show NRG Arena – Hall B
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
8:00 a.m. – Junior Breeding Heifer Show – NRG Center – Main Arena
(West – Simbrah, Santa Gertrudis, Red Brangus; East – Charolais, Shorthorn, Angus)
8:00 a.m. – Classify and Show Junior Market Barrows – NRG Center – East Arena
(Show A: Duroc, Hampshire, Poland China)
3:30 p.m. – Supreme Champion Heifer Drive – NRG Center – Main Arena
(or upon completion of Junior Breeding Beef Heifer Show)
7:30 p.m. – Fiesta Charra – NRG Center – Main Arena
MONDAY, MARCH 16
8:00 a.m. – Classify and Show Junior Market Barrows – NRG Center – East Arena
(Show B: Berkshire, Spotted and Dark Crossbred)
TUESDAY, MARCH 17
5:00 p.m. – Calf Scramble Steer Show – NRG Center – Main Arena
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
8:00 a.m. – Junior Market Steer Show – NRG Center – Main Arena
(Simmental, Chianina, Limousin, Hereford, Polled Hereford, Shorthorn)
8:00 a.m. – Classify and Show Junior Market Barrows – NRG Center – East Arena
(Show C: Yorkshire, Chester White & OPB, Light Weight Other Crossbred)
7:00 p.m. – Houston Disc Dogs – NRG Center – Main Arena
THURSDAY, MARCH 19
8:00 a.m. – Junior Market Steer Show – NRG Center – Main Arena
(Maine Anjou, Charolais, Brangus, Santa Gertrudis, Brahman, Simbrah, ABC)
8:00 a.m. – Show Junior Market Barrows – NRG Center – East Arena (Show D: Other Crossbred)
2:00 p.m. – Llama Walking Fleece Show – NRG Arena – Hall B
7:00 p.m. – Houston Disc Dogs – NRG Center – Main Arena
7:30 p.m. – Junior Market Barrow Grand Champion Selection – NRG Center – East Arena
FRIDAY, MARCH 20
8:00 a.m. – Junior Market Steer Show – NRG Center – Main Arena (AOB, Angus, Red Angus)
8:00 a.m. – Llama and Alpaca Shorn Fleece Show – NRG Arena – Hall B
8:00 a.m. – Open Llama and Alpaca Performance Show – NRG Arena – Hall B
1:00 p.m. – Open Llama and Alpaca Showmanship – NRG Arena – Hall B
8:30 p.m. – Junior Market Steer Champion Selection – NRG Stadium
SATURDAY, MARCH 21
8:00 a.m. – Llama Halter Show – NRG Arena – Hall B
9:00 a.m. – Sheep Dog Trials – NRG Center – Main Arena
11:00 a.m. – Lloan-A-Llama – NRG Arena – Hall B
5:00 p.m. – Llama and Alpaca Group Classes – NRG Arena – Hall B
6:00 p.m. – Llama and Alpaca Llympics Exhibition – NRG Arena – Hall B
7:30 p.m. – Houston Disc Dogs – NRG Center – Main Arena
SUNDAY, MARCH 22
8:00 a.m. – Youth Llama and Alpaca Showmanship and Performance – NRG Arena – Hall B
8:00 a.m. – Open & Junior Dairy Show – NRG Center – Main Arena
5:00 p.m. – Houston Disc Dogs – NRG Center – Main Arena

2015 Houston Schedule Of Auction Sales

TUESDAY, MARCH 3
3:30 p.m. – Lowline Moderator Bull Battle & Sale (sale to begin at 5:30) – NRG Center – East Arena
7:00 p.m. – Simbrah/Simmental – NRG Center – East Arena
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4
9:00 a.m. – 48th Annual All Breeds Commercial Range Bull & Female Sale – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
6:30 p.m. – International Brahman Sale – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
THURSDAY, MARCH 5
8:00 p.m. – Moreno Ranches Houston Cattle Sale – NRG Center – Rooms 201-203
FRIDAY, MARCH 6
9:00 a.m. – South Texas Beefmaster Breeders Magic XV Cattle Sale – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
1:00 p.m. – South Texas Beefmaster Breeders Cattle Futurity and Classic Sale – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
1:00 p.m. – United Braford Breeders Assn. International Sale – Crowne Plaza Hotel
3:00 p.m. – Mid-Coast Santa Gertrudis International Super Sale – Crowne Plaza Hotel
6:30 p.m. – Ideal Video Production Customer Appreciation Sale – Crowne Plaza Hotel
SATURDAY, MARCH 7
5:00 p.m. – Beefmaster Promotional Group Haltered Cattle Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
7:00 p.m. – International Brangus Association Genetic Edge Cattle Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
MONDAY, MARCH 9
3:00 p.m. – Junior Commercial Steer Sale – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
6:00 p.m. – MHBA Mini-Hereford Cattle Sale – NRG Center – East Arena
FRIDAY, MARCH 13
12:00 Noon – Junior Market Poultry Auction – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
SATURDAY, MARCH 14
12:00 Noon – Junior Market Lamb & Goat Auction – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
FRIDAY, MARCH 20
12:00 Noon – Junior Market Barrow Auction – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion
SATURDAY, MARCH 21
12:00 Noon – Junior Market Steer Auction – NRG Arena – Sales Pavilion

Direct Receipts

Direct Receipts: 46,700

Texas 17,900. 99 pct over 600 lbs. 27 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 640 lbs 217.00; 745 lbs 202.25; 750-775 lbs 203.01; 800-830 lbs 201.04; 850 lbs 193.24; Mar 800-825 lbs 195.90; Apr 850 lbs 197.05; Del Current 710 lbs 214.70; 750-775 lbs 203.71; 800-835 lbs 199.54; 850 lbs 195.00; 900 lbs 189.00; Mar 800 lbs 200.20. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 675 lbs 213.05; 750-775 lbs 195.70; 800 lbs 196.31; 850 lbs 191.73; 900-905 lbs 185.14; Del Current 775 lbs 202.35; 840 lbs 190.00; 850-890 lbs 190.99; 900 lbs 189.00; 950 lbs 184.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 650-675 lbs 200.75; 700-725 lbs 194.06; 775 lbs 189.00; Mar 800 lbs 191.60; Apr 700 lbs 196.75; May 725 lbs 188.30; June 700 lbs 195.50; Del Current 685 lbs 200.50; 700-735 lbs 195.26; 750 lbs 192.87. Medium and Large 1-2 FOB Current 725 lbs 186.72; 750 lbs 185.00; 850 lbs 174.75; Del Current 825 lbs 191.00.

Oklahoma 7100. 96 pct over 600 lbs. 16 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 775 lbs 202.00; 800-835 lbs 197.37; 850-880 lbs 190.47; 900-925 lbs 187.89; 950 lbs 182.08. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 725 lbs 206.87; 775 lbs 194.64; 800 lbs 193.37. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 685 lbs 198.00; 700-725 lbs 194.20; 750 lbs 192.00; 825 lbs 189.39. Medium and Large 12 Current 700 lbs 190.37.

New Mexico 2600. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 3 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 Current 750-775 lbs 202.56; 800-825 lbs 198.56; 900 lbs 188.00. Medium and Large 1-2 Current 750-775 lbs 198.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 Current 725 lbs 191.00.

Kansas 7800. 100 pct over 600 lbs. 29 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 750 lbs 200.89; 800-840 lbs 198.15; 850-875 lbs 194.03. Medium and Large 1-2 Del Current 800-835 lbs 198.82; 860 lbs 192.00; 970 lbs 180.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 FOB Current 700-740 lbs 192.71; 750-775 lbs 189.19.

National Feeder Cattle Summary

St. Joseph, MO — February 20
National feeder cattle receipts: 176,600

Feeder cattle and calves followed through on support that was shown last week selling mostly steady to $5 higher, with some instances of $10 higher on calves. Recently, the feeder cattle market has been a rapidly descending affair and finding a bottom is difficult. The last couple of weeks it seems the market may have found some legs; whether this market has found long legs or short legs is difficult to say. Just when you think this market has found some legs, it can’t stand prosperity and has a selloff. Despite the frozen tundra that prevails throughout much of the major cattle producing areas, stocker demand for the most part was very good this week. Backgrounders are expecting grass cattle supplies to be tight as we go into spring; and everybody knows a few guys that will buy cattle for grass, no matter what they cost. In many areas of the country, especially in the Northern Plains and the Midwest are securing top quality females to grow through the spring and then turn in with the bulls. At the Hub City Livestock Auction in Aberdeen, S.D. on Wednesday sold over 250 head of top quality replacement heifers averaging 771 lbs for a weighted average price of $235.85 and over 120 head of “mothers to be” averaging 826 lbs for a weighted average price of $238.77. In Burwell, NE last Friday February 13th sold over 165 head of replacement quality heifers averaging 613 lbs for a weighted average price of $264.64 and near 350 head of heifers averaging 690 lbs for a weighted average price of $231.69. There are still multiple layers of overhead resistance that will continue to challenge the feeder cattle markets, but Boxed-beef demand is attempting to find a bottom and starting to find some footing after seasonal slowdown. The labor dispute on the West Coast is not helping exports and a settlement could go a long way in improving beef exports as it threatens much of the US economy. Relief from winter storms pounding the Northeastern seaboard and major population centers has slowed beef consumption and movement. A shift in the investment scene that causes fund managers to read fundamental cattle production data more literally; but the case right now is that regardless of market fundamentals and structure, fund managers just don’t want to be long at this time in the cattle complex. Any of these occurrences or a slight combination at any level could be enough to jumpstart feeder cattle prices back on track. We need to keep commodity prices in perspective, where prices have been and where prices could go. The cattle and hog spread is another thing to keep in mind. Hog supplies remain much larger than anticipated and with decreased exports have created a glut of pork for the domestic market to absorb. Even though beef is the preferred meat of consumers; a dressed hog is quite a bargain when compared to a dressed steer. For the week, feedlots in the Southern Plains traded cattle $2 lower at mostly $160, while dressed sales in Nebraska were steady to $3 lower at $253-258. Friday afternoon’s Cattle on Feed Report had February 1 inventory at 100 percent; placements at 89 percent; marketings came in at 91 percent. Inventory and placements were slightly higher than expected, with marketing’s slightly smaller than expected. Auction volume included 68 percent over 600 lbs and 39 percent heifers.

Texas 5100. 75 pct over 600 lbs. 31 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (424) 311.41; 500-550 lbs (518) 278.61; 550-600 lbs (567) 267.67; 600-650 lbs (642) 243.07; 650-700 lbs (686) 222.60; 700-750 lbs (731) 215.38; 750-800 lbs (773) 209.45; 800-850 lbs (825) 198.35; 900-950 lbs (910) 191.22; load 1035 lbs 176.50. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (482) 272.14; 500-550 lbs (506) 258.19; 550-600 lbs (577) 246.93; 650-700 lbs (674) 215.53; 700-750 lbs (720) 208.30; 750-800 lbs (785) 197.72; 800-850 lbs (822) 197.39. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (434) 275.32; 500-550 lbs (528) 233.71; 550-600 lbs (572) 222.00; 600-650 lbs (630) 202.12; 650-700 lbs (661) 208.17; 700-750 lbs (738) 188.64; 750-800 lbs (765) 187.96; 800-850 lbs (827) 180.74. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (521) 220.43; 550-600 lbs (578) 212.73; 600-650 lbs (622) 207.63; 700-750 lbs (739) 185.79; 800-850 lbs (836) 177.35.

Oklahoma 20,500. 77 pct over 600 lbs. 33 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (320) 371.50; 350-400 lbs (373) 343.68; 400-450 lbs (420) 316.23; 450-500 lbs (470) 294.03; 500-550 lbs (522) 275.64; 550-600 lbs (573) 262.58; 600-650 lbs (620) 245.83; 650-700 lbs (671) 226.94; 700-750 lbs (721) 215.61; 750-800 lbs (776) 208.31; 800-850 lbs (823) 200.25; 850-900 lbs (870) 192.10; 900-950 lbs (927) 186.22; 950-1000 lbs (968) 181.68; 1000-1050 lbs (1070) 172.21. Medium and Large 1-2 400-450 lbs (424) 293.00; 450-500 lbs (480) 284.47; 500-550 lbs (514) 265.21; 550-600 lbs (591) 238.11; 600-650 lbs (629) 232.76; 650-700 lbs (692) 232.76; 700-750 lbs (730) 212.98; 750-800 lbs (767) 199.71; 800-850 lbs (833) 191.01; 850-900 lbs (873) 186.99; 900-950 lbs (930) 181.93; 950-1000 lbs (965) 178.83; 1000-1050 lbs (1017) 172.33; load 1095 lbs 178.00. Holsteins: Large 3 half load 595 lbs 171.50; load 810 lbs 171.75; load 865 lbs 162.00. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (324) 325.27; 350-400 lbs (375) 296.15; 400-450 lbs (419) 264.32; 450-500 lbs (471) 262.66; 500-550 lbs (524) 242.37; 550-600 lbs (575) 232.59; 600-650 lbs (619) 218.31; 650-700 lbs (677) 203.48; 700-750 lbs (724) 199.86; 750-800 lbs (762) 191.07; 800-850 lbs (818) 186.64; 850-900 lbs (874) 177.35; 900-950 lbs (931) 175.30; 950-1000 lbs (979) 170.18. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (374) 260.38; 400-450 lbs (437) 252.17; 450-500 lbs (479) 239.80; 500-550 lbs (538) 231.09; 550-600 lbs (584) 210.85; 600-650 lbs (645) 202.43; 650-700 lbs (683) 195.00; 700-750 lbs (736) 188.90; 750-800 lbs (759) 186.78; 800-850 lbs (835) 177.42; load 890 lbs 177.50.

New Mexico 3400. 35 pct over 600 lbs. 38 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (374) 330.77; 400-450 lbs (422) 309.78; 450-500 lbs (469) 297.84; 500-550 lbs (524) 273.53; 550-600 lbs (570) 247.60; 600-650 lbs (621) 238.66; 650-700 lbs (666) 220.61; 700-750 lbs (717) 204.55; 750-800 lbs (781) 199.23; 800-850 lbs (822) 191.75. Medium and Large 1-2 300-350 lbs (341) 321.94; 350-400 lbs (382) 310.72; 400-450 lbs (443) 288.83; 450-500 lbs (480) 268.47; 500-550 lbs (530) 245.61; 550-600 lbs (571) 238.12; 650-700 lbs (662) 198.28; 700-750 lbs (743) 192.65. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (375) 281.15; 400-450 lbs (426) 276.75; 450-500 lbs (466) 262.65; 500-550 lbs (524) 244.35; 550-600 lbs (561) 229.23; 600-650 lbs (620) 210.11; 700-750 lbs (710) 197.32; 750-800 lbs (779) 186.90. Medium and Large 1-2 350-400 lbs (374) 269.10; 400-450 lbs (432) 249.31; 450-500 lbs (475) 241.03.

Kansas 11,500. 92 pct over 600 lbs. 37 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 450-500 lbs (457) 303.26; 500-550 lbs (513) 290.06; 550-600 lbs (557) 273.76; 600-650 lbs (624) 241.38; 650-700 lbs (677) 222.35; 700-750 lbs (725) 218.38; 750-800 lbs (770) 207.73; 800-850 lbs (829) 200.09; 850-900 lbs (870) 193.01; 900-950 lbs (922) 189.22; 950-1000 lbs (960) 184.85; 1000-1050 lbs (1024) 175.81; 1050-1100 lbs (1068) 174.89. Medium and Large 1-2 500-550 lbs (535) 273.76; 550-600 lbs (575) 259.05; 600-650 lbs (616) 228.68; 650-700 lbs (695) 217.65; 700-750 lbs (733) 211.18; 750-800 lbs (782) 203.65; 800-850 lbs (819) 196.58; 850-900 lbs (881) 186.53; 900-950 lbs (924) 185.32. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 400-450 lbs (434) 272.65; 500-550 lbs (527) 254.56; 550-600 lbs (582) 234.82; 600-650 lbs (631) 215.68; 650-700 lbs (677) 205.05; 700-750 lbs (730) 195.13; 750-800 lbs (772) 189.42; 800-850 lbs (822) 184.18; 850-900 lbs (866) 181.65; 900-950 lbs (918) 176.40; 950-1000 lbs (975) 174.10. Medium and Large 1-2 450-500 lbs (494) 236.85; 500-550 lbs (519) 246.09; 550-600 lbs (589) 233.39; 600-650 lbs (626) 206.40; 650-700 lbs (681) 199.52; 700-750 lbs (730) 191.67; 750-800 lbs (777) 185.96; 800-850 lbs (833) 180.64; 850-900 lbs (873) 176.65.

Missouri 15,700. 70 pct over 600 lbs. 35 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (363) 321.42; 400-450 lbs (423) 303.52; 450-500 lbs (479) 290.16; 500-550 lbs (526) 277.66; 550-600 lbs (573) 264.50; 600-650 lbs (619) 247.30; 650-700 lbs (677) 231.08; 700-750 lbs (722) 219.07; 750-800 lbs (769) 210.00; 800-850 lbs (826) 199.28; 850-900 lbs (878) 191.45. Medium and Large 12 350-400 lbs (382) 300.63; 450-500 lbs (476) 265.75; 500-550 lbs (525) 264.91; 550-600 lbs (573) 253.63; 600-650 lbs (614) 228.48; 650-700 lbs (671) 220.69; 750-800 lbs (765) 199.70; 800-850 lbs (833) 196.06; 850-900 lbs (872) 188.03. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs (383) 282.50; 400-450 lbs (419) 266.06; 450-500 lbs (472) 256.59; 500-550 lbs (530) 241.90; 550-600 lbs (575) 235.32; 600-650 lbs (621) 217.02; 650-700 lbs (667) 214.51; 700-750 lbs (715) 211.15; 750-800 lbs (773) 185.93; 800-850 lbs (826) 183.17. Medium and Large 12 350-400 lbs (384) 270.18; 400-450 lbs (426) 245.81; 450-500 lbs (477) 240.49; 500-550 lbs (524) 235.62; 550-600 lbs (579) 217.68; 600-650 lbs (628) 209.14; 650-700 lbs (678) 197.71; 700-750 lbs (728) 194.16; 750-800 lbs (779) 186.25; load 830 lbs 189.25.

Arkansas 1200. 15 pct over 600 lbs. 48 pct heifers. Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (329) 336.73; 350-400 lbs (377) 323.14; 400-450 lbs (425) 298.43; 450-500 lbs (471) 283.84; 500-550 lbs (521) 265.87; 550-600 lbs (568) 250.33; 600-650 lbs (622) 236.79; 650-700 lbs (673) 219.94. Heifers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs (327) 290.47; 350-400 lbs (371) 281.05; 400-450 lbs (419) 274.61; 450-500 lbs (473) 255.21; 500-550 lbs (525) 238.27; 550-600 lbs (570) 220.80; 600-650 lbs (622) 210.07; 650-700 lbs (675) 203.28.

 

 

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Thursday, February 26, 2015 3:40 PM